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February 05, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-05

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n Arbor Citizens Ask

nstitution

t Petition
Meeting
t Year,

BRAZER VIEWS SITUATION:
Little Change
In Michigan T

S!

I-r-

Both Parties' Heads
Give Endorsement
By PIULIP SHERMAN
ann Arborites were the first
higan citizens to join the "con-:
"chorus line.
unior Chamber of Commerce
sident Herbert O. Werth re-
ted the first copy of the peti-
2 which would start the wheels
a 1960 constitutional conven-
iwas circulated here this week.
'he petition is being sponsored
the Jaycees and the League of
men Voters, and has been en-
sed by both Gov. G. Mennen
lams and Paul Bagwell, titular
da of the state Democratic and
ublican parties.
Verth emphasized the petition
paign is only the first step in
ing the constitutional conven-
e.
calls for a vote in the Novem-
election on changing the
ndment of the constitution
ling with conventions. If the
ded 300 thousands signatures
obtained, the amendment will
m the ballot.
Name Changes
rinciple change asked deals
h representation. Now, dele-
s to a constitutional conven-
L are chosen on the basis of
e for each senatorial district;
the new clause, one delegate
1d be chosen for each senator
representative.
erth said this represented a
rtisan compromise.
the amendment is approved
rovember, there will be a vote
he following spring election on
n gthe conclave, he continued.
rhe new amendment changes
dates of the old rules, which
ifled a vote on the convention
958, and then not necessarily
n until 1974; the 1958 ques-
s are still bogged down in the
,t. )
Need Special Election
the voters approve a consti-
mal convention, Werth said,
e must be a special election
name delegates within four
ths; the delegates would be
ed on the new basis.
here will then be a convention
in 1961; any constitutional
ages approved by the conven-
will be brought before the
rs in the spring election of
Werth concluded.
th said petitions would be cir-
ted locally on an individual
. The League of Women
rs has 250 volunteers who
circulate petitions, in addition
he Jaycee Women's Auxiliary
the Jaycees themselves.

The tax situation in Michi
will be unchanged during 1
Prof. Harvey Brazer of the E
nomics department and resea
associate at the Institute of P
lic Administration, said here W
nesday.
Speaking before the twent
annual Management Institute,
eluding 90 Michigan city mi
agers, Prof. Brazer said, "Prosp
for action on Michigan's tax s
ation in the 1960 legislature
almost nil.
"It also is a false dream to th
that the legislature will takec
of the municipalities probl
during the next session," P
Brazer continued.
"The governor's present buc
of $409 million makes no provie
for capital outlay," the econon
told the 'city managers, "The
ure is one which will not per
the state to provide the serv
which are demanded of it."
Chance for Action
The first chance for act
Prof. Brazer said, will come vi
the November elections, when+
Asks 'To En
ROT1C Plan
Wayne State University Pr
dent Clarence Hilberry hag rec
mended to the Air Force that
ROTC unit at Wayne be ab
doned.
High cost, of operation combi
with a small number of off
graduates were the reasons
his recommendation.
The recommendation went
the six-member university bo
of governors whose decision wil
final.
Hilberry also recommended t
cadets be allowed to complete,
qualifications for completionE
active duty in the Air Force.
There are 240 cadets in1
Wayne unit,. including 20 juni
See Related Story page 8, sectio
and seniors. Cost to the Air FO
was estimated at $72,000 a y
and to the university, $5,000.
The Air Force was informed
the possibility of dropping1
program at a meeting last Nove
ber.
At the November meeting, it a
pointed out that the money nee
to replace present AFROTC fac
ties was too great for the ne
This gave impetus to the sugg
tion to drop the program.
The Air Force policy of disesti
lishing non-productive corps in
cated that they would be recept

igan
1960,
eco-
arch
?ub-
red-
Jeth
in-
an-
ects
itu-
are
rink
are
lems
>rof.
dget
sion
mist
fig-
mit
ices
ion,
with
one
d'
esi-
om. 1
its
an-
ned
icer
for
to
ard
. be
hat
the
and
the
ors
n 1
rce
ear
of
the
m-
aas
ded
ili-
ed.
es-
ab-
di-
ve
re-
be-
det
70

t
p
St
W
e:

o three t
pected on
"If we v
if public
inly at th
sumption.
The act
solve the
were "don
manner,"
existing to

"In the
bore heav
business.
taxes in
added to t
zer mainta
"If wea
an irratic
tax struc
plained,"v
along now
lar to a ba
ing othert
lar fashion
"This ap
tolerable
now it is
take from
personal i
Prof. Br
tax collect
year woul
"But,"r
state's mu
increase of
share oft
to 1959, a
tributed o
much toa
problems.'

,onvention
Parties. Split
F oreseen By Proposal
ax Scene Of Revision
ax proposals can be ex- The constitutional convention
the ballot. petition campaign has created
want to enjoy a high level some division within the major
services we can do so parties.
e expense of private con- The state AFL-CIO, led by Aug-
"t ust "Gus" Scholle, has opposed the
ion of the legislature to move; and it has been said Wil-
tax situation last term liams' approval of the plan has cut
ne in a rather hesitant the ground from under the Demo-
merely adding to already cratic proposal for a vote on a
axes, he said. unicameral legislature for the
Bore Heavily state.
Williams explained he support-
past, Michigan taxes ed the present plan, after having
vily on consumers and opposed past actions because:
The legislature increased "We have consistently favored
a manner which only a constitutional convention, but
that burden," Prof. Bra- we have stood firmly against a
wined. convention based on the present
are satisfied to live with gerrymandered and unrepresenta-
onal, highly inequitable tive State Senate."
ture, Prof. Brazer ex- The convention plan was ap-
we probably can struggle proved by a stormy session of the
and then adding a dol- Republican State Central Com-
arrel-of beer and increas- mittee meeting late last month
existing taxes in r simi- and then endorsed by 1958 GOP
}n. gubernatorial candidate.
pproach might have been However, Republican senators
a few years ago, but went on record opposing the move.
not when state taxes The comments of Sen. Lewis C.
five to seven per cent of Christman (R-Ann Arbor) were
ncome," he said, fairly typical.
azer estimated that sales Sen Christman said he had no
tions for the 1961 fiscal objection to a constitutional con-
d be about $345 million. vention, but emphasized present
he concluded, "for the "ground rules" should be accepted
Lnicipalities this is an until changed by regular proce-
f only $7 million in their dure.
the sales tax compared Changes in procedure - mainly
nd $7 million when dis- the question of delegate selec-
ver the state won't help tion - should be handled indi-
solve the municipalities' vidually, rather than lumped to-
gether, Sen. Christman amplified.

Asks More
For 'State's
Universities
By The Assocated Press
More money for education was
the big feature of Gov. G. Mennen
Williams' "stop-gap" budget, an-
nounced Jan. 27.
The budget, balanced at $409
million, called for no new or in-
creased taxes.
A quarter of this figure, $112
million, is allotted to education
the University will receive $36
million, if the budget is approved,
a gain of $2,400,000; Michigan
State University is to geta $2,-
600,000 increase to $30 million;
increases for the other state col-
leges and universities are com-
mensurate.
The only other increase in the
budget is for mental health. Wil-
liams asked a total of $75 million,
a boost of $,400,000.
No Reduction Planned
Williams said the budget "does
not in any way represent my es-
timate of the needs of the state."
The proposed totals mean that
there will be no reduction of the
state's planned $72 million debt.
Republican leaders, while prais-
ing the "hold-the-line" budget as
"realistic," "logical" andd"reason-
able," still maintained it could be
cut.
"I think we can cut a few mil-
lion dollars without hurting any-
body, or knocking out any agen-
cies," Sen. Lynn O. Francis (Mid-
land), GOP floorleader, comment-
ed. "It's time to start thinking
about cutting the costs of govern-
ment."
Use Tuition
Rep. Allison Green (Kingston),
GOP House floorleader, argued
Williams' revenue estimates were
too liberal.
Williams bad forecast a $20
million boost in sales tax receipts
over this year and a six per cent
"growth factor" which would
make the budget balance at the
$409 million figure.
Still to come is the governor's
proposed $150 million building
program, to be financed by a bond
issue.

JACOBSON'S BRINGS
A NEW BUDGET FASHION SHOP
TO THE CO-EDS of MICHIGAN
conveniently located inour
beautiful and completely remodeled
lower level
COME IN AND VISIT this smart new shop that has been
planned for budget-wise co-eds of fashion, and features
trend-setting moderately priced apparel that meets the
standards of good taste and fashion!
SPORTSWEAR - DRESSES - COATS - SUITS - SHOES
%
A
..r
t-
' A large selection of novelty and classic crdigans and pull
avers in a variety of fashion colors! Of top quality wool/fr
blend, that would usually sell for much more, now idelly .
priced to supplement your casual war wardrobe. izes 34-40.
FOR THE BUDGE T-WISE
YOUNG WOMAN OF F*AS41ON.

I1 ii

Iera ldsr

the arrival of spring

L IV \

and the new semester with a new casual line
of Cottons, India madras, aizd beautiful Batik
Prints.
, + ,

e will be no door-to-door
ign he added.
'or the city, Werth reported,
)0 signatures with an addi-
15,000 to come from the
Washtenaw County.
present, the convention
be apportioned on the basis
atorial districts..

to the University's probabler
quest.
Efforts to keep the program b
gan in November when the ca
commander pointed out that'
per cent of Air Force officers com
from ROTC programs such
Wayne State's.

1212 South University

Campus Theatre Building

Ir

Fe 51c419atn Dtli

Second Front Page

Page 3

ay, Feb. 5

"SWEEP THE DECK"
HOE SALE
FALL & WINTER STOCK
DRESS SHOES

me
as

on mmmmmmae wr~wmm m mm m m mm mn mm im imimmininwrirwwwww~r w miniininmninmnininnirwrwwh
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATIONi
1429 Hill Street
Telephone: NO 3-4129 '
announces the fol wn
Friday, Feb. 5, 7:15 P.M. Sabbath Orientation Service in
Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel, followed
by Oneg Sabbat
Sat, Feb. 6, 9:15 A.M. Community Sabbath Services
Sunday, Feb. 7, 7:30 P.M. MIXER, Admission free to members
75c to others
* Tuesday, Feb. 9,7:00 P.M. Elementary Hebrew Class*
' 7:30 P.M. Intermediate Hebrew Class
3 w
* U
Sunday, Feb. 14,6:00 P.M. Supper Club
Weekly Kosher Delicatessen
Pay at door: 75c-Members
$1.25-Non-Mem6ers
8:00 P.M. Faculty-Grad. Student Series
Prof. Louise E. Cuyler, Musicologist
"Ernest Bloch: The Man and His Work" ;
Wed., Feb. 17, 8:00 P.M. Start of Series: Jewish-Gentile Relations:
Germany, Soviet Union, U.S.:

BUDGET SHOP

SPECIAL!

MOus
ANDS
VER.
4.00
AI R

$

Value
to
$14.99

SPORT, FLATS, CASUAL
AOST VaIu
)LORS 1 1.,Ato
~~to

je

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I

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