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May 03, 1960 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y, MAY 3,1960

THE MICHIGAN DAI4,V

PlA

Y, MY 3,1960THE MICHGAN A~1

X £3uJZ .

Jewish Lack
Total Group
Assimilation
By MARSHA FRANKEL
"Considering the overall situa-
tion, the character of the Jewish
people is lacking in some elements
of assimilation," Rabbi Edward
Neufeld said.
In a public lecture at Hillel,
Rabbi Neufeld of Grand Rapids,
discussed the topic, "Jewish Sur-
vival vs. Assimilation,"
"Assuming, that every group
changes with the passage of time,
the Jewish people are an ethnic
unit with a religious core. As such,
there is ample room for various
ethical, cultural and religious
ideals or standards."
Calls Fusion Natural
Assimilation, or the fusion of
groups, is an entirely natural and
normal process, for the desire
of group survival is normal and
must not be attributed solely to
the Jews.
Every national group who comes
to this country wishes to retain
some of the sentiments of their
national culture, their language,
customs and associations with
their heritage.
Rabbi Neufeld said that the his-
torical, political and economic
conditions in the United States
favor the assimilation and ab-
sorbtion of national groups into
an "American" culture.
Tracing the history of Jewish
survival, he said there are three
instances in which the assimila-
tion of the Jews on the group level
was not favorable. These were in
ancient Greece, medieval Spain
and modern Germany.
Patriotic Attitude
In each case, there was a genuine
patriotic attitude toward the coun-
try; in each case the Jews were
unusually creative; in each case
the average Jew wanted to be in-
tegrated into the non - Jewish
population. In spite of this, Greece,
Spain and Germany rejected the
Jews, and subjected them to perse-
cution. This could account for the
lack of "assimilation element" in
the character of the Jewish peo-
ple today, he said.
Since this lack of assimilation
brings about a negative attitude,
he suggested trying a positive atti-
tude of shaping and patterning the
present Jewish culture having
every Jew participate. By this,
Rabbi Neufeld implied not only
religious identification, but also
identification through the Hebrew
language; the ideals of the state
of Israel; and the Jewish past and
future.
Elaborating upon one's allegi-
ance to Israel, he said that this
is not a political allegiance-that
an American Jew is still an Amer-
ican - and that it is entirely pos-
sible today to have a plurality of
cultural attachments.
Maintaining that the survival
of a culture depends upon its
strength, Rabbi Neufeld expressed
his faith that there is enough
vitality in the present generation
to insure this survival-but that it
requires the active participation of
every Jew.

'U' Foresters Win Annual Conclave

I

11cp044 CAnspu

Il

S.

The first steering committee
meeting of Challenge will be at
4:15 today in Rm. 3529, Student
Activities Building.
This will be open to anyone
interested, and the officers will be
elected.
Prof. Emeritus Roy W. Sellars
will give a lecture on "John
Dewey's Social Philosophy" at
4:15 today in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
The lecture will be sponsored by
the education school and the
philosophy department.
The Four Freshmen will give a
concert at 8 tonight at Pease
Auditorium on the Eastern Michi-
gan Campus in Ypsilanti. The box
office at Pease will open at 6:30
p.m. or tickets may be obtained
at Marshall's Book Store.
The annual IQU bicycle race
will be held at 2:30 on Sunday,
May 15 on the asphalt walks
around the Michigan Stadium.
The race lasts two hours and
the winner is the team which
has gone the farthest distance dur-
ing the time.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

BIKES and SCOOTERS
1958 VESPA. Excellent condition, wind-
shield. Call NO 3-2005 between 5 and
6. Z33
ZUNDAPP SCOOTER-'58 Vella. Sacri-
fice for quick sale. $225. NO 2-5377.
Z30
There was a young man named Mike
Who crossed sweet Betsy on his bike
But Betsy was clever
She rode her scooter-
Now Mike is flying a kite.
MOTOR SCOOTERS, INC.

LINES
2
3
4

ONE-DAY
.82
.96
1.12

SPECIAL
TEN-DAY
RATE
.39
.47
.54

314 Detroit St.

NO 8-6927

MIDWEST FORESTERS' CONCLAVE--The University Foresters
won the annual conference Sunday at the Proud Lake recreation
area near Milford for the second straight year, scoring 45 of a
possible 90 points. In bait casting, the special event, Michigan
took first and second place. The University Foresters' Club hosted
the conclave this year, and the events it sponsored included log-
rolling, chopping, log-throwing, chain-throwing and match-
splitting.

LOGGERS
... it's sawing time

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN Xd:

(Continued on Page 5)
Women Engineers (temporary recogni-
tion), Challenge (temporary recogni-
tion). Calendaring Committee, Activi-
ties. Education Committee, Forum Pro-
gram.
Ad Hoc Committees: J-Hop Report.
Conference on Racial Discrimination in
the North (Seasonwein).
New Business: Voting Registration
Report (Adams). National-Internation-
al Committee (Shah). May 17 Demon-
stration (Seasonwein, Haber).
Members' and Constituents' Time.
Announcements.
Adjournment.
Items for next week's agenda.
Summary Action Taken by Student
Government Council at its Meeting May
1, 1960: In accordance with provisions
of the Student Government Council
operating plan, this action becomes ef-
fective on the fifth day from this pub-
lication,
Approved minutes previous meeting.
Approved communication to the Pres-
ident of the University of Illinois and
members of the Board of Trustees of
than University as follows:
"We, the Student Government Coun-
cil of the University of Michigan,
strongly object to the action which
recertly relieved Professor Leo Koch "of
his duties." This action was taken, ao-
cording to the official press release of
the University of Illinois's Information
Service, because of the letter written
by Professor Koch and printed in the
March 18 issue of the Daily Illini.
While this body does not necessarily
agree with the views expressed by Pro-
fessor Koch, we do not believe that his
statement of them was either obscene
or incitive. Thus, we strongly affirm
his right to express these views. '
Any American has not only the right
to so express his views but also the re-
sponsibility to do so. The responsibility
of the teacher to express what he be-
lieves to be truth. This responsibility
cannot be abnegated merely because
"most people" find such beliefs "repug-,
nant" or "offensive,"
A University must encourage, aid and
protect its faculty members when their
tight to free expression is challenged.
This, rather than the suppression of

such free expression, seems to be in thej
best interests of any University which
hopes to regard itself as aneducational
institution, Therefore, this body re-
quests that the University of Illinois
take the necessary steps to reinstate
Professor Leo Koch.
(This motion shall also be communi-
cated to the Faculty Senate of the
University of Michigan with a request
that the Senate take action similar to
ours. Copies shall also be sent to the
University of Illinois' student govern-
ing body and Professor Koch.)"
Considered amendments to the pro-
posed regulation relating to member-
ship in student organizations. Approv-
ed:
Restatement of the proposed regula-
tion to read: "All recognized student
organizations shall select membership
and afford opportunities to members
on the basis of personal merit and not
race, color, religion, creed, national
origin, or ancestry."
Exception may be made for national-
ity and religious groups.
Under Composition: (2) Provision thatt
students be selected through written
petition in interview.
U n d er Establishment: Substitute
"with all due speed" for "within twoI
weeks,"
Foreign Visitors
Following are the foreign visitors who
will be on the campus this week on the'
dates indicated. Program arrangements
are being made by the International
Center: Mrs. Clifford R. Miller.
Mr. John D. Turner, Senior Lecturer,
Dept. of Education, Nigerian College of+
Arts, Science and Technology, Zaria ,
Nigeria, May 2-7.
Miss Laksmi Subardjo, Pianist, Indo-
nesia, May 3-6.
Dr. Ludwik Ehrlich, Professor of In-
ternational Law, Jagiellionie University
Krakow, Poland, May 7-11,
Mr. Pieter de Wolff. Director, CentralF
Planning Bureau, Hague, Professor of
Mathematical Statistics and Economies,
Univ. of Amsterdam, Netherlands, May
6-10.
Lectures

City, will speak on "The United Arab Port Huron - Art, Ment. Ret., Sight
Republic, 1960: Progress and Problems" Saving, Gifted.
on Wed., May 4 at 4:15 p.m. in Aud. C. Saginaw - Speech Correction.
St. Charles - Home Ec.
St. Clair - Industrial Arts.
Academ ic Notices StArtses.-Home Ec.
Sheridan - Industrial Arts.

"New Noise In Ann Arbor Writing,"
a panel discussion featuring the editors
of three literary magazines of local
origin, Robert Davis of Arbor, Ann Don-
iger of Generation, and Lalit Udani of
Abishek, will be presented by the Eng-
lish Journal Club. Public invited. Rack-
hav Bldg., West Conference Room,
Tues., May 3 at 8:00 p.m.
Mathematics Colloquium: Prof. Wil-
bur E. Davis, Department of Mathe-
matics, Michigan State University, will
speak on "A condition for solvability
of finite groups," Tues., May 3, at 4:00
p.m. in room 3011 Angell Hall. Refresh-
ments: 3:30 p.m. in room 3212 Angell
Hail.
Psychology Colloquium: Prof. A. Dun-
can Luce, University of Pennsylvania.
"A Discrimination Model Analysis of
Weight Lifting Data." Wed., May 4, 4:15
p.m., Aud. B. Coffee will be served in
3417 Mason Hall from 3:45 to 4:15.
Everyone welcome,
Doctoral Examination for Earl Alex-
ander Spiller, Jr., Business Administra-
tion; thesis: "Significance and Influ-
ence of Accounting Data Adjusted for
Price-Level Changes on the Problems
and Policies of Public Utilities," Tues.,
May 3, 8th Floor Conference Room,
School of Business Administration.
Chairman, R. L. Dixon.
Doctoral Examination for Donald
Evans Hamachek, Education: thesis: "A
Study of the Relationships between
Certain Measurers of Growth and the
Self - Images of Elementary School
Children," Wed., May 4, 2532 University
Elementary School, at 10:00 a.m. Chair-
man, W. A. Ketcham.
Doctoral Examination for Tainto John
Niemi, Library Science; thesis: *"The
Finnish Lutheran Book Concern, 1900-
1950: A Historical and Developmental
Study," Wed., May 4, East Council
Room, Rackham Bldg., at 10:00 a.m.

Southgate - General Shop Mech.
Drawing.
Standish - Speech,
Sturgis - English/Journalism, Eng-
lish/Speech, Speech Correction.
Utica - Guidance.
Vassar - Speech.

1'

11

r

The Michigan Daily
Business Staff
provides valuable
experience in
Adverising
JOIN NOWT

p

4

Lecture: BernardLeacn, potterifron Chairman, R. H. Ojelsness.
St. Ives, England will be the guest
speaker at a lecture on Tues., May 3 Doctoral Examination for Manfred!
at 7:30 p.m. in the Architecture Aud. David Engelmann. Zoology; thesis: "The
Role of the Arthropods in the Soil
Lecture: "The Spread of Ideas: A Sim- Community of an Old-field with Em-
ulation Model," Dr. Prof. Torsten Har- phasis on Energetics," Wed., May 4,
erstrand, The Royal University of 1045 Natural Science Bldg., at 2:00 p.m.
Lund, Lund, Sweden, on Tues., May 3 Chairman, N. Q. Hairston.
at 4:15 p.m., Aud. C.
Lecture: Dr. Holger Hyden, Medical Placem ent Notices

q

WW6---&

.--
n..

"

piL

1

I

Faculty, University of Goteborg, Swe-
den, will speak on "The Functional Re-
lationship Between Glia and Nerve
Cells" on Tues., May 3 at 3 p.m. in
Aud. C.
Prof. Emeritus of Philosophy Roy
Wood Sellars will give a lecture of "John
Dewey's Social Philosophy" in Aud. B.
4:15 p.m., May 3.
Lecture: Dr. Lester M. Field, Prof. of
Electrical Engrg., California Institute
of Technology will speak on "Low Noise
Vacuum Tube Devices and Parametric
Amplifiers" on Wed,, May 4 at 3:30 p~m.
in Aud. B.
Richard H. Nolte, Director, Institute
of Current World Affairs, New York
NO WO
is the time to
you r
WINTER
GARMENTS
Returned fresh
and clean at the end
of the season.

SUMMER PLACEMENT
Interviews:
May 2. Heath Survey Consultants,
Inc., Weilesley, Mass.. will interview
Forestry students, Botany majors, or
Plant Pathologists who have finished
their sophomore yr. Pay is good.
May 3. Paul Hansicker of Camp Ar-
butus, a Mich. camp, will interview
women for the following counselor jobs:
Sailing, music and dramatics.
May 5 and 6. Camp Wabi-Kai of Tor-
onto, Canada, Mr. Bert Danson will in-
terview men and women counselors
Thursday afternoon and Friday morn-
ing. Looking for sailing, riding and
riflery people - must be 19 or over.
There are still job requests coming
into the Summer Placement Service,
Today's mail, Mfonday, May 2nd, a re-
quest for jobs at the Star Lake Inn,
Ithaca, New York and Park Side Dining
Room in Charlevoix, Mich. So people
still want summer help.
The Summer Placement is open every
afternoon and Friday mornings, in
Room D528 of the S.A.B.
The following Michigan schools have
listed teaching vacancies for the 1960
school year.
Holt - Art.
Holton - Home Ec., 7th & 8th Grade
Room.
Howell - Art.
Hudson - Guidance, Home Ec.
Ionia - Guidance, Art, Speech Cor-
rection.
Ithaca - Speech/Social Studies,
Lansing - Art.
Leroy - Home Ec.
Lincoln Park - Industrial Arts,
Speech Corr., Visiting Tchr, Art, Ment.
Ret.
Madison Heights - Home Ec.
Madison Heights (Lamphere Schs.) -
Mentally Retarded Type C.
Manchester - Speech Correction,
Manistee - Mech. Drawing.
Mount Clemens - All Fields of Spec-
ial Education.
Mount Clemens (L'Anse Creuse) -
Eng / Drama / Speech, Visiting Tchr.,
Ment. Ret.
Muskegon - Mentally Retarded.
Ortonville - Speech Correction.

I

Warren - Home Ec., Art, Industrial
Arts, Mentally Retarded.
For any additional information con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Administration Building, NOrmandy 3-
1511, Ext. 489.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS
Westchester County, White Plains,
N.Y., makes an appointment, each year,
of one of more Public Administration
Interns, Applicants must have com-
pleted the course requirements for a
Master's degree in Public Admin-of-
fers excellentropportunity to gain sup-
ervised experience.
Executive Manpower Corp., New York
consultants, are seeking a Vice Presi-
dent-Manufacturing for a client firm.
Must have college degree, excellent
health and stamina, ability to lead and
develop a mtg. team, ability to delegate
responsibility effectively, and be cost
and quality conscious.
Navy Dept. has their April listing of
Civilian Job opportunities on file with
the Bureau. Openings in many fields,
all over the U.S.
U.S. Civil service Commission, St.
Louis, Mo., announces opportunities
for Scientists - Chemists, Physicists,
and Mathematicians, from GS-5 to GS-
12. Pamphlet of information is on file
at the Bureau.
Forest Products Lab., Madison, Wis.,
announces a grad. study program for
people with BS or MS in Chem. Engrg.
or Chemistry.
Grieve-Hendry Co., Chicago, has need
of a young Mechanical Engineer to
work with Chief Engr. in the design of
Industrial Ovens and Furnaces. Must
have BS degree.
For further information concerning
any of the above positions, contact the
Bureau ofrAppointments, 4001 Admin.,
Ext. 3371 or 509.
Student Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available to students. Applications for
these jobs can be made in the Non-
Academic Personnel Office, Room 1020
Administration Building, during the
following hours: Monday through Fri-
day, 8:00 a.m to 12:30 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time work should contact
Bill Wenrich, Student Interviewer at
NOrmandy 3-1511, extension 2939.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 1020, daily.
MALE
2 Meal jobs in sorority house. (NO 3-
2052).
8 Meal jobs,
10 Odd jobs.
2 Salesmen (Commission for 3 weeks
in June - good money).
2 Soda jerks (9:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. 3
nights per week).
2 Desk clerk (12:30 noon to 6:45 p.m.
6 days per week).
1 Shoe salesman (Monday 3 p.m. tol
8:30 p.m., and Saturdays).
3 Telephone solicitors.
1 Waiter.
FEMALE
I Counter server.
3 Typists (16-20 hrs. per week).
1 Typist (full-time for the month of
May, then 20 hrs, per week).
2 Saleswomen (Commission for 3 weeks
in June - good money).
1 Sales clerk (20 hrs. per week, through
September).
1 Waitress.
2 Car hops.
1 Dietetics Technician (weekends).
3 Standby saleswomen.
3 Baby sitters.
1 Histologist (morning only, Monday-
Friday),
Organization
Notices
International Folk Dancers, Dancing
& Instruction, May 4, 8 p.m., Lane Hall,
* * .
World University Service, Meeting for
students who want to man buckets,
May 4, 8:30 p.m., League.

zil
FOR RENT
FOR SUMMER-3 man apartment near
campus. Call NO 2-8886. C35
SUMMER, 2 man ultra modern apt. on
South U., only one block from cam-
pus. Newly furnished. Contact Al
Greenberg at NO 3-0120. C34
APARTMENT FOR SUMMER sublet, 2-
bedroom, Pine panelled sub-basement.
Sure to be cool. 3-3429. 2 blocks from
campus C31
FURNISHED APT., 4 rooms, including
bedroom and private bath, 1 block to
U of M, 2 blocks to hospital. ,Nurses,
secretaries or married couples. Phone
3-1790 C32
MODERN APARTMENTS for summer at
reduced rent, completely furnished
including TV. Close to campus and
the hospitals. NO 3-1318. C33
SUMMER: Modern penthouse for four
or five, Completely furnished, air-
conditioning, sun deck, kitchen fa-
cilities including dishes, cooking uten-
sils and dish washer. 1336 Geddes
Avenue on campus. Open evenings
from 6:30 to 6:45. Best offer takes. NO
3-5135. C30
FOR SUMMER: Spacious, modern, 6
room apt. for 3 or 4, washer and dry-
er, wall to wall carpeting, back yard.
NO 3-7001. C29
FOR SUMMER-Two-man apartment. 3
rooms and adjoining study room.
Completely furnished. Kitchen facili-
ties inc. l11" blocks from campus-
545 S, Division.Call after 7:30. NO 3-
1724. C28
SUMMER SUBLET: triple, furnished, 1
block from S. Quad. NO 2-7635. C22'
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Apartment
available for summer session. Good
location. GE 7-7523 and NO 3-612.
C23
3 ROOM FURNISHED APARTMENT.
Near campus. Available June 15 for
year lease or for summer. Only $115
per month, NO 5-5728 after 5:30 p.m.
C24
SUMMER, furnished, 4 bedroom house
1 block from campus. Call NO 3-4145,
Ext. F22. C25
SUMMER: Another modern penthouse
(see ad C-5). Call NO 3-8628. C21
FOR SUMMER, air conditioned, fur-
nished, 2 year old 4 room apt. 1
block from campus. Complete kitch-
en facilities. Call NO 2-3541. C92
THREE APARTMENTS in South Cam-
pus area. Available June 15 for one
year lease, or for summer months
only. Furnishedr$110.00-$130.00 per
month. Call Mike Reynolds after 6
p.m. NO 3-7761. C20
FOR SUMMER: 5 room furnished apt.
close to campus. NO 3-3626. C15
FOR SUMMER: Furnished apt. for 2
to 4 men. Call NO 3-7541 ext. 805.
C17
410 OBSERVATORY near Stockwell,,
new 2 bedroom apartments. Immedi-
ate possession. Call NO 2-7787 or eve-
nings NO 5-6714. C85
839 TAPPAN near Bus. Ed. School. 2
bedroom furnished deluxe couple or
4 people. Call days NO 2-7787 or eve-
nings NO 5-6714. C84
ACTUALLY on campus, clean 5 roomsI
furnished. NO 3-5947. C20
CAMPUS ROOMS for men, reasonable.
Linens furnished. NO 3-4747. C17
LARGE ROOM, single $8 per week. HU
2-4959, 5643 Geddes Road. C35
GIRL WANTED to share spacious apart-
ment close to campus next semester.
Call NO 5-7616 after 5 p.m. C67_
DO YOU HAVE boarders moving out-
Rooms for rent? Apartments for rent?
Do you want a cheap, convenient,
widely read source to publish this in-
formation??????????? then - try the
MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIED
NO 2-4786
C42
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Girl's H.S. Class Ring with "W"
on mounting. On night of April 30.
Please call Richard Avhill, 409 Lloyd-
House, W.Q. A51

HELP WANTED
I AM INTERESTED in someone who
really wants to make money during
summer vacation. NO 8-8661 or NO
3-1056. H49
JUNIORS, SENIORS & GRADS wanted
for psychology experiment concerned
with different techniques for meas-
uring personality. Total time ap-
proximately 10 hours. Rate $1.25 per
hour. Call Univ. ext 2493 and ask
for Mrs. Collins H48
BUDGET TECHNICIAN (I) $89.20 to
$110.80. To 1.11 future vacancies. Grad-
uation from an accredited college,
preferably in business or public ad-
ministration. Obtain application for
examination by writing Michigan Civ-
il Service, Lansing 13. H47
REGISTERED medical technologist in-
cluding position chief technician for
chemical laboratory and blood bank.
Apply personnel office. Beyer Memorial
Hospital, Ypsilanti, Mich. Phone HU
2-6500, Ext. 228. H46
TEACHERS WANTED: $5000 and up.
Vacancies in all Western States. In-
quire Columbine Teachers Agency,
1320 Pearl, Boulder, Colorado. H41
CAMP COUNSELLOR - male. 8 week
boys' summer camp located near Che-
boygan, Michigan. Assistant water-
front director, must have instruc-
tor's certificate and be able to teach
sailing. Archery instructor - general
counselor. If interested call NO 2-
9454 evenings. H43
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results
WANTED TO RENT
NORTH CAMPUS, 2-bedroom ground
floor apartment, including dishes,
linens, etc. From June 6 to Aug. 6.
Call NO 3-8908. L17
HOUSE WANTED. Faculty member de-
sires to rent reasonable 3-bedroom
house. Sept. 1, 1960-June 30, 1961, un-
furnished or furnished. Box 12, Daily.
L16
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
RADIO-PHONO SERVICE
(Pick up and delivery)
Bargain on diamond needles-all types
Hi-FI kits and service
Pre-recorded tapes, 2 and 4 track
Open 10-6 Monday through Saturday
HI-FI STUDIO

1319 South University

X43

MAYNARD & SEEGER
WELDERS and
BLACKSMITHING
109 S..Ashley
NO 8-7403

BUSINESS SERVICES
REWEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes,
Weave-Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade,
NO 2-4647.
Having trouble digesting your food?
Then run down to Ralph's
to soothe your digestinal tract.
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 2-3175
F80
TYPING in my home. Geraldine Koel-
ler, 111 Worden. NO 3-9585. J61
THESIS illustrations a specialty. Call
NO 3-5718. J4

PIANOS-ORGANS NEW & USED
Ann Arbor Piano & Organ Co.
213 E. Washington NO 3-3109
Xl
Service on All
Radios, T.V.'s and Hi-Fl's
All Work Guaranteed
STOFFLET'S RADIO AND TV SERVICE
207 E. Ann NO8-8116
X22
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X14
ORGANS and PIANOS by WURLIT-
ZER, EVERETT, & THOMAS. Mak-
ers, restorers, and dealers of rare
violins and bows. Also GUITARS and
BRASS INSTRUMENTS.
Sales -- Service - Rentals - Lessons

Figure 5 average words to o line.
Call Classified between 1:00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
and 9:00 and 11:30 Saturday - Phone NO 2-4786

J'S

BUSINESS SERVICES: A-1 MOVING,
baggage transfer agents. Pick-up, and
deliver. Yellow Cab Co. NO 3-2424, NO
8-9382. 39
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: Daily ride to and from De-
troit during summer session, Call
Sue White, 3520 Stockwell. 048
USED CARS
57 MERCURY MONTCLAIRE hard top.
Best offer accepted.'NO 3-6210. N28
1960 MORGAN 4/4 roadster, 2,000 miles.
Phone NO 3-3162 after 5 P.M. N27
USED CAR: 1958 Flat, excellent shape,
$845 or best offer. NO 8-9703. N26
1957 RED HILLMAN convertible for
sale. Call 5-3512. N24
59 CORVETTE, forest blue, four speed
transmission. 245 horsepower. Poal-
traction and 411 rear end. Unques-
tionable condition. NO 2-1147 between
6 and 7. N21
1958 EDSEL PACER. 4 door, V-8 stand-
ard transmission, heater, 2 tone in-
lsh, 5 new white wall tires. Clean.
$1150. NO 2-9832 N22
1957 MERCEDES BENZ, excellent con-
dition. Call NO 5-8126 after 5 P.M.
N23
BARGAIN CORNER
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$7.95 socks
39c. shorts 69c military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. WI
PERSONAL
2 2
S C equals Soph Show Central Com-
mittee Soph Show mass meeting far
class of '63 tonight at 7:30. Vanden-
berg room-League. F18
ROOMMATE Sue and Steve and Stan
and Stu Roommate Meredith and Irv
and Stan and Stu Fraternity Bros.
Stan and Stu & Steve Coherts Steve
and Orv. Too many cooks spoil the
broth . . . F19
DISPOSING of my large library at pri-
vate sale. Many books on many sub-
jects of interest to students. My
books are catalogued, ask to see cata-
logue of books not on display, Call at
617 Packard 11 A.M.-4 P.M. daily ex-
cept Sunday. P48
82 C2 Express Mass Meeting Tuesday,
Vandenberg Room, League, 7:30.
F84
BUSINESS PERSONAL
HONEYMOONERS: Spend your honey-
moon at Kay-Ray Log Cottages on
East Grand Traverse Bay, 10 miles
north of Traverse City. These log
cottages with natural fireplaces are
in a beautiful pine woods right on
the water. They are secluded, modern
and equipped for cooking. Linens ftur-
nished.
10% discount to the first 10 reserva-
tions received. Write: Kay-Ray, R.R.
No. 2, Box 133, Williamsburg, Mich.
FYI
BEFORE you buy a class ring, look at
the official Michigan ring. Burr Pat-
terson and Auld Co., 1209 South Uni..
versity, NO 8-8887. F99
FOR THE BEST IN MUSIC it's Johnny
Harberd - Bob Elliot - Boll Weevils -
Andy Anderson - Dick Tilkin - Al
Blaser - Kingsmen - Ray Louis -
Larry Kass plus many others. Phone
THE BUD-MOR AGENCY, NO 2-8362.
FF100
EUROPEAN TOURS, '60. 45 days, 9
countries including Oberammergau
Passion Play & Olympics, if desired.
All for $705. For details write West-
ropa, Box 2053, Ann Arbor. FFI
FOR SALE
EVERGREENS at wholesale for Univer.
sity personnel by University employee.
Yews, junipers, arborvitae. Spreading,
globe, upright forms. Call Michael Lee
at NO 8-8574. B54

MADDY
209 E. Liberty.

MUSIC
NO 3-3395
X40

LOST: Zippo lighter
Initials D.H.L. Call
Quad. Reward.

by West Engin.
301 Prescott, E.
A49

CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
NEW ATLAS TIRES
"Gripsafe" in sets of 4; 4-670x15,
$58.75; 750x14, $74.95; (plus recap-
able tires and tax). Other sizes
comparably low. Tune-ups. Brake
service.
HICKEY'S SERVICE STATION
Cor. Main & Catherine NO 8-7717
84
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.

Lubrication $1.50

For RESULTS
ci

Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858 87
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires. batteries and accessor-
ies. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it I"

I

" Will Do the Jab foi You

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