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April 29, 1960 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-29

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FRIDAY, APRIL 29,1960

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, APRIL 29,1960 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

L £1'.E,, mv .iI

Three Michigan
Track Team Engages Best
In Penn Relays Competition
By BILL PHELPS

Teams Away

Baseball Team Faces Iowa,
Minnesota on Road Trip

B Lester Bird, Steve Williams, and
Ben McRae - thse will be the
names opposite "Michigan" on the
list of entries for individual events
in the Penn Relays which start
today.
Although the meet consists
mainly of track relay races, there
are a few individual events to add
to the excitement.
Bird is the Penn Relays defend-
'M' Club
Elects Four.
The Michigan "M" Club yester-
day announced the election of
their new officers for the coming
year.
The officers represent three
sports with swimming having two
+ear~snear~nt tr .. .3 fa -i r

ing champion in the broad jump
and is back to defend his title
. .. IF. The "if" is the question of
whether his often-injured leg can
stand the competition. As of Wed-
nesday afternoon, Bird wasn't too
optimistic, but had decided with
Coach Don Canham to make the
trip to Philadelphia and see how
the leg felt after warm-up.
Tough Competition
The action around the high
Jump pit will see Steve Williams,
who has done in the vicinity of
6'?" this winter, trying to im-
prove upon his mark of 6'4" in
last week's Ohio/Relays. He cer-
tainly will have a lot of compe-
tition as Boston University's John
Thomas and San Jose State's
Errol Williams, currently the best
in the country, are entered.
The 120 high hurdles will see
McRae in action against Francis
Washington of Winston-Salem
College anod several other top
fence iumnerts Canham insistc

By BRIAN MacCLOWRY
Don Lund's baseball team opens
a crucial three game road trip to-
day when they meet the Iowa
Hawkeyes at Iowa City.
Tomorrow the Wolverines travel
to Minneapolis for a tell tale
doubleheader with the defending
champion Gophers.
Little left hander Bob Marcereau
will be on the hill today for the
Wolverines as they bid to stay on
top of the Big Ten standings.
Michigan possesses a 2-1 con-
ference record, good enough for a
tie with Illinois for the lead. Iowa
will be making their conference
debut today.
It will be Marcereau's first Big
Ten start of the season. Until now
he has only pitched in 15 innings,
and has no record. Last year, as
a sophomore, Marcereau led the
team in innings pitched in Big
Ten play with 40. He had a 2-3
record and a 5.68 E.R.A.
Iowa has been none too impres-
sive this year, having played six
games with Arizona U. on their
spring trip and dropped them all.
Michigan split a pair of games
with the same club, losing 12-9
and winning 11-9. Last year Iowa
finished ninth in the conference
with a 5-9 record.
Iowa will probably call on their
ace right hander Roger Rudeen to
face the Wolverines. Last year Ru-
deen accounted for three of Iowa's
five conference wins and owned a
respectable 4.03 E.R.A.
When Michigan meets Minne-
sota Coach Don Lund will send his

two big right handers Dennis Mc-
Ginn and Al Koch to the mound
in an attempt to halt the rampag-
ing Gophers. Minnesota has won
their last twelve games and possess
an overall 14-4 record.
Last year Minnesota won the
conference crown with a 10-2
record but didn't have a chance
to test the Wolverines as a sched-
uled doubleheader was rained out.
Michigan will probably face
Minnesota's Fred Bruckbauer in
one of the games. Last year Bruck-
bauer owned a 5-1 conference
record and a 1.70 E.R.A.

representatives. Eiected were: pt1U ti~e5 .WIai uas
Andy Morrow, '61E, Pres. (Swim- that McRae has the potential to
ming); Donald Chalfant, '61, Vice- be one of the very best hurdlers
Pres. (Track); William Darnton, around, and the speed merchant
'61E, Secretary, (Swimming) ; from Newport News, Va. is out to
Todd Grant, '62, Treasurer, (Foot- justify his faith. The first heats
ball). are this afternoon.
T QSPORTS BEAT
by TOM WITECKI
The "Champions of the West" flew eastward today in quest of
several of collegiate track's most coveted trophies-championship gold
watches from the Penn Relays.
Coach Don Canham has his Big Ten indoor champions entered
in six of the eight "relay championship of America" events at the
66th renewal of the Penn Carnival. And hopes are high that the Wol-
verines will duplicate or surpass their fine '52 and '53 performances
when they ran off with two of the eight highly coveted titles.
But to do this Michigan will have to put on some really great
performances, for the competition at Penn is rough, as always.
In today's only relay final-the distance medley-Michigan's
toughest competition will be Duke, whose fine collection of runners
are favored to give the Blue Devils their first Penn Relay crown in
18 years. Michigan will throw its best possible quartet at the favored
southerners.
Bryan Gibson will run the opening quarter mile, Tony Seth the
half mile and Dave Martin the three-quarter mile leg. If the Wolver-
ines are near the front of the pack at this stage, they should be in
good shape for Ergas Leps, who will run the final leg, is not only a
top miler, but a fine anchor man.
It is for that reason Coach Canham will have Leps running on
two more relay teams Saturday. Leps will finish off the four mile
team in back of Jim Wyman, Fred Montour and Dave Martion. Duke
and New York University are favored in this event.
Running ahead of Leps in the two mile relay will be Frank Geist,
Seth and Captain Earl Deardorff. This is the one relay title Michigan
won last year and they will be pressed to defend it against Michigan
State and Yale. The Spartans have the fastest clocking of the season
-a 7:32.2 mark. However, the Wolverines beat the Spartan foursome
at Ohio Relays last weekend with a 7:36.5 time.
San Jose State is the favorite in both the 440 and 880-yard sprint
relays; however, Canham thinks Morgan State will give his quartet
the toughest fight. Dick Cephas, Bennie McRae and Tom Robinson
will make up three-fourths of both sprint quartets with Jeff Engels
joining them in the 440 and Len Cercone in the 880.
In the day's final relay, the one mile, Villanova, seeking its sixth
straight title, is again favored. Michigan's quartet will be Marsh Dick-
--rson, Seth, Cephas and either Gibson or Cercone.
Even with the high quality of some of its entries, Michigan will
have to be outstanding to duplicate the fine performances of its '52
and '53 runners.
In this two year period, Michigan had the finest collection of
distance runners in its long and successful track history. In addition
to winning the distance medley and four mile Penn Relay titles for
two years running, the fast-moving Wolverines also set several im-
pressive records.
The quartet of John Moule, Bill Hickman, John Ross and Don
McEwen set the American record for the four mile relay in the
spring of 1952 with a 17:08.6 time. Later in the Ross and McEwen
teamed with Aaron Gordon and Jack Carroll to set the world record
of 9:56.3 in the distance medley relay.
These Michigan records show what often Is thought to be true
.-to win a Penn Relay title you have to be among the nation's best#
Six different Michigan quartets will be trying to show that today
and tomorrow.

s
5
5'

BENNIE McCRAE GENE STRUCZEWSKI
... high hurdle entry . , . Michigan shortstop
Tennis Squad Meets Three
Rivals in Columbus Meet

By FRED STEINHARDT
Michigan's tennis team will get
its season off to a delayed start
as they journey to Columbus,
Ohio, to engage Ohio Wesleyanl
and Big Ten rivals Ohio State
and Indiana in a quadrangular
meet starting today and running
through tomorrow.
Coach Bill Murphy will present
three new faces as his squad opens
its defense of the Big Ten cham-
pionship. Sophomore Jim Tenney,
from Toledo, will play at number
four singles.
Sophomore Ken Mike, from De-
troit, will fill the number five
singles slot and junior Bruce Mac-
Donald, a reserve last season, will
play at number six singles. First
reserve is another sophomore, Tom
Beach of Kalamazoo.
The first three singles positions
will be filled by returning veterans
Gerry Dubie, Frank Fulten, and
John Wiley. Dubie is a junior,
Wiley and Fulton seniors.
Dubie will combine with Mike
at first doubles. Fulton and Wiley,
who won the Conference number
three duobles title in 1959, will
play at number two doubles. Ten-
ney and MacDonald are at the
number three doubles spot.
Although both Ohio State and
Indiana are relatively unknown
quantities, the results of the meet
should shed some light on the
Wolverines chances of success-
fully defending their title at
Northwestern May 19-21.
Thus the performance of new-
comers Mike, Tenney and Mac-
Donald are of particular interest.
'M' Sailors
In Detroit
The University Sailing Team
willl meet four other schools in De-
troit this weekend in the quarter-
finals of the Collegiate Nationals.
Hosting University of Detroit,
Michigan State, Wayne State and
Oberlin teams will compete against
skippers Otto Schere and Timme
Schneider for the four berths in
the Midwest Championships the
following weekend.
John Goldsmith and Otto Schere
will represent Michigan in the
Olympic quarterfinals in Wiscon-
sin May 13 and 14. All competition
for the Olympias will be monotype
as the Olympic boat is a Fin.

These are the sophomores who
will have to come through if the
Wolverines are to retain their con-
ference title.
The duel and quadrangular
meets will have no bearing on the
conference title which will be de-
cided in May.

SPORT SHORTS:

New York OK's Park;
Palmer Leads Classic

17

r

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - The New York
City board of estimate yesterday,
in a 22-2 vote, formally approved
construction of a 15-million-dol-
lar stadium in Queens, giving a
boost to the projected Continental
Baseball League.
A negative vote probably would
have killed hopes of the third ma-
jor league, which plans to begin
operation April 18, 1961.
The proposal, approved by the
board of estimate, calls for a city
appropriation of $442,000 to begin
construction of a giant-all-weath-
er park at Flushing Meadow.
The stadium is expected to be
completed by opening of the 1962
season. The New York entry in
the Continental League would play
Its games in the Polo Grounds in
1961.
Plans call for a stadium seating
55,000 for baseball and, with mov-
able sections, 60,000 for football.
A parking lot will handle 5,500
automobiles. Later a roof could be
added for protection against rain
and cold.
The city will build the stadium
and lease it to the baseball fran-
chise owners for $900,000 a year.
The venture is to be self-liquidat-
ing on the basis of a floating 30-
year bond issue.
Other members of the league
are Toronto, Minneapolis-St. Paul,
Buffalo, Atlanta, Houston, Dallas-
Fort Worth and Denver.
* * *
HOUSTON, TEX.-Arnold Pal-
mer lived up to his role as favorite
yesterday, but surprising Bill Col-
lins slipped in to match the mast-
ers champion's six-under-par 66
and share the first round lead in
the $35,000 Houston Classic golf
tournament.
Playing his first round of tourn-

ament golf since April 10, Palmer
was brilliant with a front nine 30
but came home with an even par
36.
The 6-foot-3 Collins, a former
football player at City College in
Baltimore, Md., had trouble at
times with his putter but found
his power drives well suited to the
7,122-yard, par 72 Memorial Park
course. He had a five-under 31
front nine, a one-under 35 back
nine.
Both Palmer and Collins saw
12-foot putts on the final green
stop short.

1-m

SCORES

SOCIAL FRATERNITIES
~B~'
Phi Delta Theta 40, Psi Epsilon 3
Theta Delta CiI9, Sigma Alpha
Epsilon 7
Chii Si 8, Delta Sigma Phi 7
Theta Xi 17, Theta Chi 3
PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES
Phi Alpha Delta 14, Alpha Kappa
Psi 9
Phi Rho Sigma 10, Law Club 8
Phi Chii 22. Nu Sigma Nu 0
Phi Alpha Kappa 4, Psi Omega 0
Alpha Chi sigma 7, Delta Theta
Phi 4
Phi Delta Chi 17, Delta Sigma Pi 4
Phi Epsilon Kappa 14, Phi Delta
Epsilon 6
INDEPENDENT
Buckeyes 8, Evans Scholars 3

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