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April 29, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

.F

THE MICHIGAN DAILY I

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Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

Expect Big Ten Action
On Indiana Violations

The Big Ten is expected to act
separately on the alleged recruit-
ing violations which resulted in
Indiana being placed on four-year
probation by the NCAA.
The Spring Conference meeting
will be held in East Lansing, May
21-22.
In Chicago Big Ten Commis-
sioner Tug Wilson said, "The ac-
tion reported by the NCAA was
along parallel investigations con-
ducted by the NCAA and Big Ten.
"I will report my findings pnd
conclusions to the Conference at
the next regular meeting. Until

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that time I have no further com-
ment."
When Indiana was placed on
probation in 1958 it was the Big
Ten which moved before the
NCAA. At that time the Confer-
ence suspended football coach
Phil Dickens for a season, later
the NCAA placed the institution
on a one-year probation.
It has been speculated that the
Conference will complain to the
NCAA about the usurpation of its
penalty powers and ask Indiana
to have Dickens resign.
The Conference could expell In-
diana from the Big Ten if they
should desire to do so. It is un-
likely however that such a measure
would go through, but the threat
of its use can be held over In-
diana's head until they comply
with Conference requests.
The four-year probation means
that Indiana may not compete in
any of the 14 NCAA championship
events or any of the 32 affiliated
events such as the Penn and Drake
Relays or holiday basketball tour-
naments until April 27, 1964.
Commitments already made by
the Indiana athletic department
may be fulfilled.
At the samedtime Indiana may
not appear on any NCAA televised
event (principally football and
basketball) and they would not be
eligible for any future Bowl com-
mitments which the Conference
might make.
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BaI SPORTS
by HAROLD APPLEBAUM
The Hustlin' Hoosiers
INDIANA SWIMMING coach Dr. James Counsilman spoke for his
fellow coaches at the Bloomington school Wednesday afternoon
when he said he felt badly that his boys were being penalized for some-
thing "they had nothing to do with."
The NCAA poli~cy council had just meted out a four year probation
to Indiana, as a result of alleged infractions of recruiting rules in foot-
ball, and Counsilman, who's swimmers are now forbidden to swim in
the annual NCAA meet, and his colleagues were obviously upset.
In a way the Indiana staff has a right to be upset. As Counsilman
said, the members of his team were being penalized for the sins of
others.
A look at the Hoosier athletic prospects makes it easy to see why
the coaches are perturbed:
Third in this year's NCAA meet, the Indiana swimmers had the
nation's strongest freshmen squad this season and were already picked
to win next year's title.
The Hoosier basketball team, the only team to convincingly defeat
Ohio State this past year, considered themselves to be the uncrowned
champions of the Big Ten. Next year they anticipated another struggle
with the Buckeyes, with their sights set on the NCAA championship
which the Ohioans eventually won this season. Now they won't get
that chance.
Although the Big Ten has eliminated post season football games
the Indiana eleven will also suffer. Indiana will not be able to appear
on NCAA football telecasts. The school will lose the unestimatable
publicity derived from these telecasts, and recruiting will suffer.
Then too, the overall Indiana sports program will suffer for the
very reason that has caused its woes, recruiting. Under the grant-in-
aid program Big Ten schools issue tenders on May 1. High school ath-
letes currently being wooed by Indiana may now look elsewhere when
tenders arrive next week. After all, how many athletes want to attend
an institution which will be unable to compete in any post season
activities while they are in attendance?
Is such a penalty against these athletes justified? Four years is -a
long time. After all it was football violations and nothing more which
caused the ban. Should the other sports and individuals in them be
penalized?
TOO, why did Indiana receive such a severe penalty and can
be justified?
College athletics is a big business today. Money is needed to keep
the large athletic programs rolling smoothly and increasing gate re-
ceipts are the only way a school can keep this money supply growing.
The better a team is the larger the attendance, and hence the gate
receipts expand, too.
In order to get a good team to draw the big crowds a school must
recruit, heavily and zealously. To accomplish these goals the Hoosiers
have just completed a new football stadium, double the size of its
predecessor and have recruited enthusiastically.
Indiana, however, made two mistakes. First, they recruited too
zealously. Certainly every institution does something that is against
the rules, but when an investigation committee can reel off six or
seven examples at once, the situation is out of hand. Secondly, there
is an old adage which says you can do anything as long as you don't
get caught. Indiana was caught and to make matters worse they were
caught while they were serving a previous probationary sentence. Thus
part of the question is answered.
THE COACHING STAFF is undoubtedly upset about having their
individual sports and athletes barred, but it appears that they have
shown no concern with the real problem, which is, that the athletic
program as a whole is at fault.
When one organ of the body is weak the whole being suffers. Foot-
ball violated NCAA rulings and the rest of the Indiana athletic pro-
gram must bear the pain. The strong and pure must suffer along with
the weak.
The athletic director, theoretically in charge of each University
athletic program, is responsible for what happens in his department
and in each sport. Previous probations imposed on Indiana, the fact
that 13 athletes were expelled by the administration in January, and
the recently revealed violations are concrete examples of the fact that
the situation is not under proper control.
Whether the athletic department and the University administra-
tion, which is the power above the athletic department, knew of these
situations or not, does not matter. They existed, Indiana was caught,
and now they are to pay the penalty.

By The Associated Press
Right-hander Bob Friend pick-
ed up his second four-hit shutout
and third victory as the National
League leading Pittsburgh Pirates
won their seventh in a row, 3-0 at
Philadelphia last night. In the
American League, Kansas City
dealt Detroit a third consecutive
loss, 2-1, that skidded the Tigers
into a first place tie with idle New
York.
Los Angeles led San Francisco
2-1 after six innings in the only
other game scheduled in the NL.
The A's, winning their second
in a row behind the four-hit pit-
ching of Dick Hall, a National
League castoff, held third place,

a half-game back of the Yankees
and Tigers, who won their first
five. Baltimore defeated Boston
6-1 and the Chicago White Sox
clipped Cleveland 3-1, putting the
Orioles and White Sox in a fourth
place tie with Washington at .500.
Friend struck out 11--one shy
of the Pirate record set in 1909 by
Babe Adams-after whiffing seven
in the first three innings. He
walked just one. The Pirates beat
John Buzhardt (0-2) with two
runs in the second on Dick Stu-
art's triple and singles by Bob
Clemente and Friend.
The A's had seven hits, five off
loser Don Mossi (0-1). Consecutive
two-out singles by Hank Bauer,
Norm Siebern and Bob Cerv scored
a run in the first, and they then
scored the winnerin the sixth on
a double by Bill Tuttle and Jerry
Lumpe's single. Hall, 29.
Billy Pierce (1-1) pitched a
five-hitter for the White Sox,
shutting out the Injuns until the
ninth, when Woodie Held tripled
and ex-teammate Bubba Phillips
singled. Al Smith ran his consecu-
tive-hit streak to eight with three
singles before he fouled out in the
seventh inning, and scored all of
Chicago's runs. Minnie Minoso
brought him home twice, with -a
single and sacrifice fly off loser
Gary Bell (1-1). A triple by Nel-
lie Fox scored the final run.
The Orioles, who banged six
doubles among their eight hits,
won their fourth in a row in a
four-run first against Bill Mon-
bouquette (1-2). Gene Woodling's-
single brought in two and Brooks
Robinson doubled home a pair.

Friend Pitches Four-Hitter
As Bucs Blank Phils, 3-0

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BOB FRIEND
... four hit shutout

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'

Major League Standings

AMERICAN
w
Detroit....... 5'
New York ...5
Kansas City ... 5
Baltimore......5
Washington ... 5
Chicago ....... 4
Boston ....«.. 4
Cleveland...... 2

LEAGUE 3
L Pct.
3 .625
3 .625
'4 .556
5 . .500
5 .504
4 .500
6 .400
5 .286

NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
12
2

"

W L
Pittsburgh ....10 3
x-San Francisco 8 4
x-Los Angeles . 7 5
Milwaukee .... 6 5
St. Louis ...... 5 6
Philadelihia ..5 8
Cincinnati .... 4 9
Chicago ........3
x-playing night game

Pet.
.769
.667
.583
.545
A455
.385
.308
.273

2%
3
4
5
6

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State Street on the Campus

YESTERDAY'S SCORES
Kansas City 2, Detroit 1
Chicago 3, Cleveland 1
Baltimore 6, Boston 1

YESTERDAY'S SCORES
Pittsburgh 3, Philadelphia 0
.Los Angeles 2, San Francisco 1 ..."
(6 innings)

1 '

332 S. State NO 3-3371

___________________________________________ is

campus
character:

1
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3

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5
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BR L T R A N SL AT
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