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April 15, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-15

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U.S., Britain

Sidestep

Attempt

To

Push

Economic

Pro gram

HUNGER MAY REACH THEM FIRST:
Castro Commands Troops in Search of Rebels
0.

LAS MERCEDES, Cuba (>) -,
Villagers here in the Oriente
Province foothills see little chance
that an Army captain rebelling
against Fidel Castro can hold out
Prime Minister.
for long against the bearded
All sources agree they have seen
large movements of regular army
troops in the foothills of the tow-
ering Sierra Maestra during the

past few days. Castro himself is
in personal command of the
search through his old rebel
mountain hideouts for Capt.
Manuel Beaton.
The green and brown slopes of
the Sierra above this village were
obscured today by low-hanging
clouds. The spring rainy season
is only beginning. Wild fruits and
other edibles that could help

Beaton and his band of about
50 men live off the land do not
begin to ripen until the end of
the month.
Nothing To Eat
"If the compesinors (peasants)
don't get him," said one store-
keeper, "hunger will. There's
nothing to eat up there for an-
other month."
There was no indication whether
Castro-now back in his old role
as Field General-has called on
his peasant militiament for help
in his anti-rebel operation.
A news blackout continued in
official quarters on the progress of
the eight-day hunt, which appears
U

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John Carradine
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with
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Elsa Lancaster
Short: Wanda Landowska
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concentrated on Beaton despite
the reported presence of two other
small rebel groups. Cuban news-
menreported they located Castro
in the hills but he told them to
get out.
Still At Large
Military sources would only con-
firm that Beaton is still at large
somewhere in the vast mountain
range, covering .2,000 square miles
of eastern Cuba. They refused to
comment on either the size of the
pursuing forces or' the pursued,
or whether any contact had been
made.
They also were mum on a re-
port from Santiago by a Castro
commander that Beaton's second-
in-command and two other insur-
gents have been captured. The
official said Wednesday the three
would be brought to Bayamo mili-
tary headquarters 60 miles west
of Santiago.
But their presence was not ad-
vertised at Bayamo and there was
no sign of them anywhere else in
the area.
Little Activity
Bayamo itself was hardly a
beehive of military activity. One
helicopter was at the airport.
There was no sign of any aerial
activity in connection with the:
hunt.
A reporter traveling from Ha-
vana to La Mercedes, found little
interest in the search. This con-
trasted with stories circulating in
Havana that the local popula-
tion was going all out.
However, Fidel Castro and his
brother Raul, Cuba's Minister of
the Armed Forces, were reported
pressing an inch-by-inch search
on the northern fringes of the
Sierra Maestra. This is not far
from the place where Castro him-
self established his original moun-
tain hideout against Fulgencio
Batista in 1956.
Army Invents
Anti-Collision
Flight Device
WASHINGTON (M - The Army
said yesterday it has designed a
low - cost radio apparatus that
promises to eliminate 99 per cent
fof all mid-air collisions.
Three ordnance corps scientists
studied the feasibility of various
collision-avoidance ideas and came
up with one which they said could
pave the way for complete auto-
mation of flight control.
One of the scientists, M. D. Reed
of the Diamond Ordnance Fuse
Laboratories here, said the con-
cept still exists only on paper. He
said his group had no funds to
build a working model but is con-
vinced the idea is entirely prac-
tical.
The proposed system, according
to the Army report, would have
avoided the Grand Canyon colli-
sion of two airliners which claimed
128 lives in June 1956.
THE
PROMETH IAN
OPEN DAILY
at 2 P.M.
Entertainment Nightly

Allies Close
Pre-Summit
Conference
Dispute on Proposal
Dulls Group Success
WASHINGTON (P)-The United
States and Britain yesterday side-
tracked French pleas they join
Russia in stepping up economic
aid and cutting back weapons
shipments totunderdeveloped
countries.
Foreign ministers of the Big
Three Western allies disagreed on
the issues as they wound up a pre-
summit harmony conference.
The dispute somewhat dulled
their success in forging an other-
wise solid front on the Berlin-Ger-
man and disarmament problems
their chiefs will discuss with So-
viet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev
at next month's summit confer-
ence in Paris.
Ministers Satisfied
The allied foreign ministers, in-
cluding West Germany's Heinrich
von Brentano, pronounced them-
selves well satisfied with the result
of their three days of strategy
talks.
"Preparations are well advanced
for the effective presentation of
the Western position at the sum-
mit," a final statement said.
Secretary of State Christian A.
Herter teamed with British For-
eign Secretary Selwyn Lloyd to
block approval of the French pro-
posal advanced at the last session
by French Foreign Minister Mau-
rice Couve de Murville.
Goes to Committee
After some discussion, all three
agreed to hand over the contro-
versial proposition, favored by
French President Charles de
Gaulle, to a committee of allied
diplomats for further study.
Allied spokesmen said disagree-
ment on what they called fringe
issues was unimportant compared
to their success in bridging differ-
ences on key issues the West will
discuss with Khrushchev.
In previous sessions the Foreign
Ministers had unanimously agreed
to recommend that their chiefs:
Press for Vote
1) Press Russia to negotiate a
single German peace treaty based
on a free vote by the 70 million
Germans in the Western and the
Communist sectors of the divided
land.
2) Search for a stopgap settle-
ment of their Berlin dispute with
Russia if, as seems likely, the So-
viets reject a solution within the
framework of German unity.
3) Offer Russia "quickie" par-
tial disarmament measures as a
means of reducing world tension,
if Russia continues to spurn their
sweeping plan for controlling nu-
clear weapons, missiles and con-
ventional forces.
4) Meet in Paris May 14 with
West Germany's Chancellor Kon-
rad Adenauer for a final strategy
huddle before the Summit Con-
ference begins.
Spokesmen for all Allied dele-
gations re-emphasized that the
West has -no intention of buying
off Russian pressure against Ber-
lin with concessions bigger than
those the Soviets rejected at
Geneva last June.
They stressed also that they did
not believe Khrushchev intended
to push the Belin issue to a crisis
at the summit.

POLARIS :
May Send
missiles
To NATO
WASHINGTON (/P)-The United
States is giving thought to arming
the North Atlantic alliance with
its promising submarine-launched
Polaris missile.
A state department spokesman
said yesterday discussions of this
possibility began at the Atlantic
Pact defense meeting in Paris two
weeks ago. He stressed the talks
are in a very early stage.
Word of this came a day after
Britain junked a major part of its
military rocket program and de-
cided to rely on the United States
for missiles which would be fired
from mobile rather than more
vulnerable fixed bases.
New Development
The new development fills out a
little more the picture of the
United Stateshas the missile ar-
senal of the anti-Communist alli-
ance.
State Department Press Officer
Lincoln White said Britain -
which already has been furnished
60 United States land-based in-
termediate range ballistic missiles
-has indicated it would like to
get Polarises on its own.
But White said British needs
"would necessarily have to be
considered in the light of" over-all
NATO needs.
High Command
If it was decided to go ahead,
the Polaris rockets would be as-
signed to the high command of
the alliance. This command would
deploy them where it thought
they would be most effective.
The nuclear warheads would be
kept under United States control,
but White said he understands
Britain-an atomic power in its
own rights-wants to build its
own warheads.
The sketchy announcement left
open the question of who would
build the specially-designed sub-
marines to fire any Polarises
handed over to NATO.
Cost Too Much
Most of the alliance nations are
maritime powers, but nuclear-
powered Polaris subs cost more
than 100 million dollars each and
there is doubt many could afford
a sizable fleet of them.
The United States Navy has
high hopes for the Polaris, which
is approaching the combat ready
stage. First models of the rocket
are planned for a range of 1,200
miles. Later types will have a
longer reach.
The United States already has
equipped Britain with four squal-
rons of Thor IRBM's, capable of
hitting targets 1,500 miles from
their launching pads. Italy is next
in line to get about 30 Jupiter
IRBM's in two squadrons.

l e irl igttn a

0 !LAST WEEK!
MILT KEMNITZ -paintings
J J. T. ABERNATHY-ceramics
0_
o Forsythe Gallery
O 201 Nickels Arcade over Post Office
o t
rF0R EASTERi
I ImPorted jewelry from many countries
Handcarved Sandalwood boxes
o DOLLS from India, Pakistan, }ordan and Japan.
RAW SILK ROBES for men and women.
O HAPPI COATS and BLOUSES.
42 INl DI A ART 371-10?
330 Maynard --across from Arcade
c<S<>m<=0Cmm<=oo

Second Front Page
Friday, April 15, 1960

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2000 WEST STADIUM

Iray Walston MP'rw . ".hs ' ~f

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
wishes to announce that PETITIONS
ARE NOW AVAILABLE for next year's offices.

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry ....
Tickets still available for the Friday evening and
Saturday afternoon performances of the
MUSICAL COMEDY HIT

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These may be picked up

between 8:30-4:30 daily in

the Hillel office,

11

WONDERFUL

TOWN

and are due no later than Thurs., April 21 at 5:00 P.M.

If

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
BOX OFFICE OPEN All seats reserved Friday evening, $1.75
10:30-8 Phone NO 8-6300 Saturday afternoon, $1.50
Curtain times: evenings-8 P.M., matinee-2 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

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