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April 09, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



AfIrica

Government

Bans

Negro
PAC Leader
Underground
Reserves Appear;
Raids Net Hundred
JOHANNESBURG W) - South
Africa's government, methodically
mopping up foes of its white su-
premacy policies, banned two big
Negro political organizations yes-
terday.
Defiantly, the imprisoned lead-
er of one declared "we are going
underground."
w Afield, fresh reserve troops were
mobilized for the battle the gov-
ernment appeared to have all but
won. Predawn police raids in five
cities netted more than 100 per-
sons, including some white men
and Indians suspected of backing
the Negro fight against segrega-
tion.
T h r e e hundred well - armed
police, backed by armored cars,
swept through the Negro settle-
ment of Pimville, 15 miles south-
east of Johannesburg, arresting
several hundred persons and seiz-
ing battleaxes and other weapons.
Police said they had learned
hoodlums were trying to take over
the settlement. Not a shot was
fired.
Outlawed for a year under the
National Emergency Act were the
militant Pan Africanist Congress
(CAP PAC), which claims 31,000
members, and the larger and more
moderate African National Cong-
ress (ANC).
Their chiefs are under arrest
for promotion of demonstrations
and riots initially aimed against
the South African law that re-
quires nonwhites to carry identi-
fication papers at all times.
The vow to carry on in secret
was voiced by PAC president Man-
galisco Sobukwe, a former univer-
sity instructor in languages, in a
Johannesburg courtroom where
he is on trial with 22 associates
for incitement of Negroes
"Are you now going under-
ground?" Sobukwe was asked by
a reporter for the Associated
Press.
"Yes, we are going under-
ground," he replied.
Troops called up yesterday were
a battalion or so of the South
African Irish regiment, a Johan-
nesburg unit.

Political

Groups

NEW WORLD FORCE:
Nationalism Rising in Africa,

The rising tide of African nat-
ionalism will project conflicts of
interest into world politics and
open great opportunities in new
nations for outsiders such as the
United States and Russia.
Prof. Henry L. Bretton of the
political science department pre-
sented his "Observations on In-
ternational Politics in Africa" at
the 65th annual Adult Education
Institute at the University.
"Until the end of World War II,
seven out of eight Africans, Negro
or white, were spoken for and rep-
resented in international politics
by the relatively unanimous voice
of the colonial powers.
Voices Speak
"During the next decade, the
African continent will rapidly
approach a state where some 30
to 40 voices will speak for the 200
million inhabitants," he predicted.
Conflicting interests, including
religious rivalry, racial, ethnic,
economic and personal problems,
"will now be projected onto the
stage of world politics," said Bret-
ton, who anticipates that outside
nations will inject themselves into
the affairs of the newly-inde-
pendent African nations.
"The momentum of anti-colon-
ialism will operate for the first
years of independence to eclipse
divisive factors such as personal
rivalries, economic and ethnic con-
flicts.
In time, however, the divisive
factors will come to the fore. That
will be the period of maximum
opportunity for positive as well
as negative, for constructive as
well as destructive, influences to
make themselves felt.'
Three Major Groups
He summed up three major
groups of contenders for African
influence and power as follows:
The European Powers -- Most
of the new African states are cul-
turally, economically, politically
and miktarily dependent upon the
European powers, and there is,
generally speaking, relatively lit-
tle bitterness between African
leaders and their former colonial
masters.
Against the Europeans are the
presence of suspicion and the in-
ability of France and Great Brit-
ain to make a clean break with'
racial discrimination or colonial-
ism, as in Algeria, Kenya the
Rhodesias and South Africa.

The Soviet Union - The Afri-
cans do not classify Russia as a
colonial power. The Soviet eco-
nomic development is sufficiently
recent and similar to the experi-
ence of most African states that
Africans look there for inspira-
tion rather than to the more
advanced and longer - established
Western industrial nations.
Communism is generally un-
known in Africa, and curiosity
alone militates in its favor. And
Russia lacks the diplomatic re-
strictions of Western powers.
Against the Soviet Union is its
failure to demonstrate a willing-

ness to avoid all racial discrimin-
ation, and suspicion in some
quarters that it wants to gain
power and influence in Africa at
the African's expense.
The United States-The United
States has a good record with
respect to colonies and colonial
'relationships. Africans can iden-
tify with the American struggle
for independence. Other favorable
factors are the glittering attrac-
tion of the American way of life,
the United States extension of aid
of various types, and restrained
leadership in the United Nations
and elsewhere.

Farm Riots
Show Anger
A.t Premier
PARIS (A) - President Charles
DeGaulle came home yesterday
from three triumphant days in
London, and found a packet of
trouble awaiting him.
French farmers, still angry at
his refusal to call Parliament to
discuss their woes, were far from
appeased by his latest offer of
long-range aid.
Agriculture M i n i s t e r Henry
Rochereau sent Parliament the
text of four bills which put the
government's farming policy in
concrete form for the coming
years. They providedhmoderni-
zation subsidies, increased train-
ing programs and sick benefit in-
surance for all who work the land.
The plan calls for Parliamentary
committees to start discussing
them now, so they can be debated
when the National Assembly re-
sumes its session April, 26.
But reaction from the farmers
was disturbing.
Within hours of his arrival from
London, De Gaulle was closeted
with his Prime Minister, Michel
Debre, to discuss the problem.
The main objection of farmers
is that the government's propos-
als, while not ungenerous in them-
selves, will have no immediate
effect on their tight budgets.
Massive demonstrations Thurs-
day all over France showed they
mean business. Farm union lead-
ers estimated the turnout at 400,-
000. Government officials set it
at 200,000-a figure most inde-
pendent sources judged far too'
low.

DETROIT (A) - Two powerful
groups within the American As-
sociation of University Professors
yesterday assailed present and
former state officials of South
Carolina for what they called in-
tolerable interference in the ad-
ministration of two private Negro
colleges.
The Committee on Academic
Freedom and Tenure and the
AAUP Council, a legislative and
policy making group, singled 'out
former Gov. George Bell Tim-
merman, Jr., Jessie T. Anderson,
state superintendent of education,
and the South Carolina State
Board of Education.
Their vote of condemnation
stems from the dismissal in 1958
of three white faculty members
at Benedict College and one Negro

NEGRO SCHOOLS:
Professors Blast Dismissals

u

and two white faculty members
at Allen University.
An investigating committee of
the AAUP has reported that the
state officials gave the two schools
this ultimatum: dismiss the six
teachers or suffer loss of accredit-
ation. Such loss of accreditation
threatened the very survival of
the institutions, the committee
said.
Accreditation actually was with-
drawn from Allen for a short per-
iod.
T h e investigating committee
said there were charges, never
substantiated, that the six teach-
ers were Communists. The truth
is, the committee added, that they
were known to favor racial inte-
gration and the Governor's actions

"were rooted in his determinatic
. to maintain racial segrega
tion at all costs."
The committee said that the si
teachers were .denied due aca
demic process. "They were no
supplied with a written list (
specific charges supposedly just
fying their dismissals, they wer
given no severance pay, they wei
not given due notice of dismissa
and in no instance were the
granted the hearings they requesi
ed and to which they were er
titled."
The motion adopted yesterda
condemned the state officials fo
"their conduct in using the state
accrediting power to force th-
dismissal of six faculty membei
at these two private colleges.

Dramatic Arts Center
presents l

Second Front Page.
Saturday, April 9, 1960 Page 3

two one-act plays
"THE PROPOSAL"
by. Anton Chekhov
"THE NEW TENANT"
by Eugene lonesco
April 8, 9, 10 LANE HALL
Friday and Saturday 8:30 P.M.
Sunday 8:00 P.M.
Tickets at the door:
Members 50c, Non-members $1.00

a program of
Spanish and Latin-American
Music for Piano
by REAH SADOWSKY
3 P.M., Sunday, April 10

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Little Theatre, Ann Arbor High School
Tickets at Marshall's Book Shop and
at the door:
Members 50c, Non-members $1.50

in

I

BASEMENT

r"CO ME

1t

ruaRcrii

BOOK SALE
TODAY
at
FOLLETT'IS
State St. at North University

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O N

'r r

\AATHl

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Ghost ChargeHaunts
auLucky Strike s D r. F rood

Dear Dr. Frood: I am writing my term
paper and would like to know how the
average professor differentiates between
research and plagiarism?
Lit. Major
Dear Lit: Plagiarism is when you copy
your paper from a book. Research is when
you copy your paper from more than
one book.
Dear Dr. Frood: I was shocked when
I read of ghostwriting firms preparing
term papers for certain college students.
But I was doubly horrified, upset and
stunned when I heard a rumor that you,
Dr. Frood, also use a ghost. Tell me it
isn't so, Doctor.
Jacob Marley
Dear Jacob: I categorically deny your
accusation. I do not use, nor have I ever
dsed, a ghost to write this column. I admit,
however, that when confronted with cer-
tain difficult student problems, I have
called upon my late departed Uncle
Purdy for advice and counsel.
CO* C102 4oo
Dear Dr. Frood: I have just been in-
formed that there are over 100 brands of
cigarettes on the market today. Why so
many?
Harvey J, Warerdam
GA SO

Dear Dr. Frood: I am a sophomore who
has finally mastered every syllable of the
Whiffenpoof Song. To my chagrin, I
have just discovered that I am not at-
tending Yale. Any suggestions?
Jivy Leaguer
Dear Jivy: Fake it, man, fake it.
C2 C 40
Dear Dr. Frood: I have just completed
my doctorate thesis on "The Socio-
Politico-Religio-Economico Aspects of
Tribal Development in Central Africa,
1805-1809." I believe my work has im-
mense popular appeal and would like to
have it published in pocket-book form.
How does one go about doing this?
Ethelbert Pingbank
Dear Ethelbert: One changes the title to
"Love-Starved in Mau Mau Land."

Dear Dr. Frood: I
am going nuts-nuts,
I tellyou!-trying to
solve this puzzle.
Please! What is the
secret?
Puzzled

u

I

Dear Puzzled:
I'
Dear Dr. Frood: I didnt make the crew
because I get seasick. I couldn't make
the baseball team because the resin
bag gives me a rash. I was kicked off the
track team because cinders kept getting
in my eye. And I had to drop tennis
because I get vertigo watching the ball
go back and forth. What can a great
athlete like myself do now?
Sig Lee
Dear Sig: Why don't you expose over-
emphasis of college athletics in a leading
national magazine?

FIRSI METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Minister to students
10:30 A.M. Christian Dating, Courtship and
Marriage Class, Rev. Gene Ransom, Pine
Room.
5:3$ P.M. Fellowship Supper, Pine Room,
40Oc.
7:00 P.M. Worship and Program, "Prayer"
Duane Lanchester, Danforth Seminary In-
tern.
Service Broadcast over WHRV 11:30-12:15
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH AND
THE EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon for
students, followed by breakfast in Canter-
bury House. (Morning prayer on first Sun-
day)
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and sermon.
(Holy Communion on first Sunday!
5:00 P.M. Dinner.
5:30 P.M. Rev. C. Kilmer Myers, St. Augus-
tine's Mission Trinity Parish, New York
City, New York.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YMCA Building, 110 N. 4th Ave.
Rev. Raymond Weiss, pastor. NO 3-0348
10:00 A.M. "Wounded for our transgressions"
Guest Minister, Rev. Harold Englund, Pas-
tor of the Midland Reformed Church, Mid-
land, Michigan.
11:20 A.M. Student Bible Class
THURSDAY
7:30 Maundy Thursday Communion Service
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformea
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
The Reverend Leonard Verduin, pastor
10:00 A.M. Morning Worship Service.
11:15 A.M. Coffee Hour.
7:00 P.M. Vesper Worship Service.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Avenue
Ernest R. Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister.
10:45 Worship Service
7:00 Student Group
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCI ENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty. Reading room hours are 10:00
A.M. to 5:00 P.M. daily, 7 to 9 Monday
evening.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL & CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
David E. Schramm, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "Confirmation
Revisited."
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper.
Sunday at 7:00: Special Holy Week Service,
featuring the Chapel Choir's Presentation
of "The Seven Words of Christ on the
Cross," by Heinrich Schuetz (1582-1672),
for five-part choir, five soloists, strings, and
organ. The public is cordially invited.
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.: Holy Week Com-
munion Vespers.
Thursday at 7:30 P.M.: Maundy Thursday
Communion Service.
Friday at 7:25 A.M.: Special 30-minute Good
Friday Matins, with Communion.
Friday at 1:00 P.M.: Good Friday 50-minute
service.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow NO 2-3580
Wm. S. Baker, Campus Pastor.
Patricia Pickett, Raja Nasr, counselors
Sunday morning worship at 9:00, 10:30 &
1 1:50
TRUTH HAS ITS DAY-Dr. Kuizenga,
preaching.
Seminar at 10:30-Lewis Room-I Corinthians
Student Coffee Hours at 11:30 - Library
Lounge & Lewis Room
PSF Program-"Secular Challenge"-7:00 in
the Lewis Room.
THIS WEEK IN THE CAMPUS CENTER
Tuesday 9-11 P.M. Coffee and discussion, 217
S. Observatory.
Friday, 6:30 P.M. Grad Group supper, Vance
Room. Group will attend Merrill Lecture.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron St.
William C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M. Church School
8:45 & 11:00 A.M. Morning Services
5:30 P.M. Student Guild
5:45 P.M. Jr. and Sr. High Youth Groups
7:00 P.M. Evening Services
7:30 P.M. Wednesday Prayer Meeting
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
(American Baptist Student Fellowship)
512 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, and the Rev. Hugh
D. Pickett, Ministers
SUNDAY--
9:45 A.M. Student lead Bible Study
11:00 A.M. Worship "Are You Saved?", Dr.
Loucks.
6:45 P.M. Student Fellowship, a film will be
shown. "Miracle of Love"
THURSDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,.12:00
noon and 12:30 P.M.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.
12:00 noon and 5:10 ?P.M.
Weekday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 and
12 noon.
Lenten Devotions: Wednesday evening 7:30.
Every Friday during Lent 5:00 P.M. Mass.
Friday 7:30 Stations of the Cross.
Rosary and Litany Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes in Catholic Doctrine, Philosophy,'Church
History, Scripture, Medical Ethics and Nurs-
ing Ethics taught at the Center on Weekday
evenings.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Palm Sunday:
9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services
7:00 P.M. Speaker: The Rev. Rudolf Dinkel,
Germany "Present Situation in Germany"
Wednesday:
7:15 P.M. Vesper Service with Holy Com-
munion.
Maundy Thursday:
7:15 P.M. Maundy Thursday Service with
Holy Communion
Good Friday
12:45-1:45 P.M. Service
7:15 P.M. Service
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain Street
Rev. William Nicholas, Pastor
and Student Advisor. NO 3-0698
9:45 A.M. Sunday School.
11.00 A.M. Morning Service.
6:30 P.M. Training Union.
7:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
Cooperating with Southern Baptist Convention.
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Mid-week prayer serv-
ice.
Thursday and Friday, 5:15 P.M. Vesper, Lane
Hall.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister,
SUNDAY-
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
of Ann Arbor
Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister,
Donald H. Meyer, Ministerial Interne
10:00 A:M.: Unitarian Church School
Unitarian Adult Group
"Egypt"-with Abdel Razek Ibrahim and
Moustafa Shams Eldin
11 :00 A.M. Services. Rev. Karel F. Botermans,
Flint, Michigan, on "God or Caesar"
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Students-Mrs. Gerald
Meldelsohn on: "The Religious Implications

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- 5
COLLEGE STUDENTS SMOKE ~*
MORE LUCKIES THAN
ANV flTFR R FIIII ARI.

FREE METHODIST CHURCH
420 W. Huron St.
B. Gerald Hartman, Pastor
Sunday School 10:00 A.M. "Victory Sunday"
Worship Service 11:00 A.M. The Rev. Glen
Williamson, Guest Speaker
Evening Service 7:30 P.M. The Rev. Glen
Williamson, Guest Speaker

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MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)

CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH

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