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February 09, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY,

IF

Science Fair Set

Board Elects
Klambach
Chairman
Leland J. Klambach was elect-
ed chairman of the University of
Michigan Development Council's
Board of Directors at a meeting
on Saturday, Jan. 30.
Klambach ,who graduated from
the University in 1923 and pres-
ently is president of the Massa-
chusetts Mutual Life Insurance
Company, succeeds Raymond T.
Perring as chairman. He served as
vice chairman last year and head-
ed the Finance Committee.
The function of the Develop-
ment Council is "to assist in the
public relations of the University,
especially in those aspects which
will lead to improved financial
support through gifts, grants and
bequests." Last year the Council
raised over one million dollars
from alumni, corporations, and
foundations. The money is used
for research sponsorship, special
equipment, fellowships, scholar-
hips, and other student aid.
In addition, the Development
Council is engaged in conducting
a special capital gifts campaign
called the Phoenix Continuation
Campaign. Approximately $1 mil-
lion has been secured for this
c a m p u a wide atoms-for-peace
program.

SCIENCE FAIR-This scene from last year's First Annual Southeastern Michigan Science Fair will
be repeated April 8-10 at Yost Field House. Junior and senior high school students from Hillsdale,
Jackson, Lenawee, Monroe and Washtenaw counties will be participating in the second fair. Prizes
valued at more than $800 are to be awarded and several thousand visitors are expected to view the
scientific projects on display.
ANTIOCH PAPER:
Harvard's Returning to NSA Discussed

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Harvard Univer-
sity students recently voted to re-
turn to the National Student Asso-
ciation, from which Harvardwith-
drew in 1958. The following article,
reprinted from "The Antioch Rec-
ord," discussed Harvard's return.)
Harvard University has returned
to the fold. After withdrawing
from the National Student Asso-
ciation (NSA) last year over
strong opposition, the student body
voted almost two to one this fall
to rejoin.
Harvard originally withdrew be-
cause of the prohibition on cross
regional conferences (the Student,
Council felt that holding confer-!
ences only with schools in their
region placed a needless restriction
on them and limited the useful-
ness of the conferences), the stu-
dent apathy at Harvard itself, a
basic disagreement with the tenets
of NSA (the general opinion, as
far as there is one, seems to be
that the United States student
body is too diverse to allow any
one group to represent it all) and
certain specific objections to NSA
practices; many arising from the
annual NSA convention.
'No Student Movement'
A member of the Harvard Stu-
dent Council who favors NSA ex-
pressed his, and apparently many
Harvard students' opinions, when
he said, "There is no student
movement in this country and
there shouldn't be. We should be
politically active as individuals,
not as students.
"Students are too diversified for
one group to represent them all;
whether or not there should be a
student organization, NSA isn't it.
As far as it claims to represent
students, it's fraudulent. NSA is
'nice,' but I'm skeptical. When it
does any good, I'll support it. And
It is good for our public relations
for us to belong. Maybe we can
moderate it a little. After all, if
there is a national organization
of students, Harvard should be in
it. But what can NSA possibly do
for Harvard?"
Few Vote
Although only 40 per cent of the
Harvard student body voted in
the referendum, 223 of the 1,507
who voted "don't care." Due to the
apathy in the last referendum, the
committee this time provided space
for registration of this sentiment.
One Harvard student who work-
ed at the polls said, "Kids I knew

would come up to the polls and set up all over so no one would
ask me 'Which way do I vote?' have to go out of his way to vote-
Then they'd vote whichever way and still only 40 per cent were in-
I told them. We had voting places terested enough to show up."
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A

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