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March 12, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

RA LRIAIA IWj LUl~fl I* It

aAFPtm1~aw ~wn~eiw ~', ~ej

LZ Il

ort Rise

*re*e RADICAL OR REACTIONARY?
Bn EDWARD TIoNENBE isarma mn SGC Supports Controversial Group

Creal Notes

Classes

or Adults

Enrollment in the Joint Division
Adult Education of the Univer-
ty and Wayne StateUniversity
r the current sprin semester
as increased 33 per cent over a
ar ago, with a total of 3,5001
udents.
Of this number, 2,200 live out-
de the metropolitan areas sur-
unding the universities and must'
avel to classes in the Rackham'
ldg. or the Wayne State campus.
his is an increase of 39 per cent.
The divison's program at Dear-'
orn opened this semester and
as regarded as successful with
s enrollment of 115 adults.
Some 195 students registered for
ie eight courses offered during
ternoons.

"My job is to define the major
problems of disarmament," Prof.
David Singer of the political
science department said, preview-
ing his speech for the Campus
United Nations Week kickoff
meeting tomorrow.
"These problems include sur-
prise attack, production and test-
ing of nuclear weapons, and re-
duction of conventional weapons
and manpower," Prof. Singer
noted.
"I will also discuss the questions
of whether or not disarmament is
worth pursuing in a tension-rid-
den world, and whether the world
needs political settlement before
any attempt can be made at dis-
armament."
Foreshadowing his examination
of the topic, Prof. Singer com-
mented, "While it may be difficult
to negotiate any disarmament

I

Held Over
3rd Big Week

ACADEMY
AWARD
Nominees

DIAL
NO 5-6290
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
KATHARINE HEPBURN
"Best Actress"
M m umm flME
TAYWOR CUR 153DM

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Also Nominated for
BEST ART
DIRECTION
ACADEMY AWARD

61(W

agreement as long as political
issues are unresolved and inter-
national tensions are high, there
seems to be no alternative.
Retain Capabilities
"As long as the nations retain
their military capabilities there is
little likelihood of political settle-
ment and less likelihood of ten-
sion reduction. Disarmament must
be negotiated in the presence of
international tensions or not at
all."
In addition, Professors Richard
Park of the political science de-
partment and Hugh Patrick of
the economics department will
outline "Aid to Developing Na-
tions" at the meeting.
The first point of Prof. Parks'
talk will be "the nature and level
of economic assistance that is
needed to make it possible for a
developing nation to reach a 'take
off' point, which is the point at
which a nation can begin to be
self-supporting."
Effective Aid
The problem of the right time
and method for effective aid will
be his second topic. "I suspect
that many people concerned with
United Nations Week advocate
aid through the UN instead of
directly from this country to an-
other.
"I personally question whether
this is effective. Experience has
shown that direct aid wastes less
time and money, and has a more
striking impression.%
This meeting opens a week of
seminzs forums, and delegate
meetings leading up to the mock
UN session Saturday, March 19.
Delegates from over fifty nations
will make motions and vote on
"Disarmament" and , "Aid to
Emerging Nations."
Seminar topics will include "As-
sistance to Underdeveloped Coun-
tries," "International Law and
Alliances," "The World Population
Problems," and "The Development
of American Diplomacy and the
United Nations."
Sloan, Leader
Scholarships
Now Available
Applications for the Alfred P.
Sloan scholarships and Student
Leader Exchange Fellowships are
available in Rm. 2011 of the SAB.
The five Sloan scholarships,
ranging from $200 to $1,200,
are for students in engineering,
business administration,'- mathe-
matics, science and a sophomore
of "outstanding qualifications in
Dean of Men Ivan W. Parker
any field of study," Assistant Dean
of men Ivan W. Parker said.
The qualifications include an
excellent academic record and sig-
nificant participation in student
activities. Financial status is not
a factor in scholarship selection,
although the stipend varies with
need.
The application deadline for the
Sloan scholarships is March 15
and for the Fellowship March 14.

DIAL NO 2-6264

NOW!

IF YOU NEVER SEE ANOTHER MOTION
PICTURE IN YOUR LIFE YOU MUST SEE
71, I: 1 ! ! i

,.
,_

PROF. J. DAVID SINGER
to speak
'U' PROGRAM.
Emphasize
N ear' East
(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
fourth in a series of five articles+
about foreign studies at the Un-
versity. The fifth article will deal
with South Asian studies.)
By RALPH KAPLAN {
Two Persian chairs at the en-..
trance of an otherwise typically
American office are a rather
strange sight.
They are there, however, as
symbols of Near Eastern culture
and the Near Eastern Studies de-
partment.
This department was begun in
1949 when department chairman
Prof. George. C. Cameron was
recruited from a similar program
at the University of Chicago to
head the University's program.
"Extraordinary interest was cre-
ated in the Near East by recent
events," instructor James Stewart-
Robinson's said, explaining the
program's creation.
From 1949 to 1959 the major
studies in the department were
"most likely ancient history and
languages," he continued.
In 1951, the Ford Foundation
granted the department $100,000
and "it really began functioning."
With the help of the Ford grant,
the department added Arabic and
Islamic history in 1950-51, anthro-
pology, and Persian in 1951-52,
art, political 'science and Biblical
history in 1952-53, and Turkish,
in 1956-57.
Based on Collaboration
The program is based on col-
laboration between related de-
partments. These are anthropol-
ogy, classical studies, geography,
history, history of art, Near East-
ern studies, philosophy, political
science, and sociology. Specialists
in the related departments teach
courses which receive credit for
concentration in Near Eastern
studies.
"The addition of new specialists
caused an enrollment increase,"
Stewart - Robinson explained.
There are now 46 graduate stu-
dents in the program.
Inclusion of the department in
the National Defense Education
Act program has attracted more
students to the department. "Gov-
ernment scholarships attract
people to the University."
Frst Step
The first step in putting the de-
partment in the program was the
introduction of elementary mod-
ern literary Arabic on a semi-
intensive basis in the fall of 1959.
Next fall intermediate Arabic
will be offered on the same basis,
as will elementary Turkish and
Persian.
Possible new courses include a
literature course and a course on
the institutions of the area.
A definite course, to be started
In the spring of 1961, is the "His-
tory of Institutions in Islamic
Countries," to be taught by Prof.
George F. Hourani of the Near
Eastern Studies department.

By RICHARD OSTUNG
The Student Government Coun-
cl spends $1,200 a year on an or-
ganzaton whch has been spoken
of as a dangerous radcal force,
and as a tool of our reactonary
State Departmenty
The organization is the National
Student Association, a confedera-
tion of the student governments
of nearly 400 colleges. The NSA
is the only union which repre-
sents the American student com-
munity, and since it expresse opin-
ions on controversial issues at its
annual congress, it has naturally
been exposed to considerable criti-
cism from both the left and the
right.
What does NSA do fr the Michi-
gan student?
Mst f the benefits are indirect
cmpared with such SGC prJects
as the Student Book Exchange,
Patricia Backman, '62, NSA co-
ordinator for SGC, explained.
Ideas on matters of interest to
students are clarified at the con-
gresses, and act as a basis for
representing American students to
the college leaders of the world at
the International Student Confer-
ence.
Report Cited
A recent report at Columbia
University called the NSA congress
"a potent illustration of the
United States' student's maturity,
concern, and responsibility."
The Columbia report minimized
the importance of aid which NSA
gives to student governments, but
Miss Backman feels that this is
one of its chief functions at Mich-
igan. Assi-tance takes the form of
information, advice, and ideas for
committees, publication of the
"National Student News" and
other publicationes on student life
and higher education, and assist-
ance in campus programming,
such as the organization of inter-
national student relations semi-
nars. .
Expenses for regional and na-
tional meetings consume about
three-fourths of the local NSA
budget, but are essential in bring-
ing students closer together so
that government problems and
educational controversies can be
discussed.
Opinions Expressed
The opinions expressed at the
annual congress lead to an under-
standing of differing views, an
awareness of issues in general,
and a consensus of opinion which
NSA uses to represent students on
special commissions, at the United
Nations, to our national govern-
ment, and at the ISC meetings
each year.
The best example of a direct
benefit is Educational Travel, Inc.,
which offers low-cost foreign
tours, enabling American students
to meet students of other coun-

tries, and to see more than is
often covered on similar tours.
At the national congress, held
during the summer vacation, the
University is entitled to seven,
delegates, who are usually SGC
members, with the priority often
given to elected members. Occa-
sionally committee members will
be either delegates or alternates.
The delegation is nominated by
the SGC Executive Committee and
approved by the Council.
In voting on issues, University
delegates follow their own ideas
when they are not sure how the
campus feels. It is usually hard
to tell what campus opinion is so
the vote is representative rather
than being an exact expression of
local ideas, Miss Backman said.
The recent report proposing that
Harvard University rejoin NSA
had the following opinion of rep-
resentation: "Resolutions probably
do fairly well reflect informed
student opinion. Representation
can never be a mirror-image of
constituencies; the hope is that
the constituencies will be well-'
informed, and that representatives
will vote according to their in-
formed opinion in the best inter-
ests of their constituents."
Membership Crucial
Membership in NSA is crucial
for expressing student opinion.
Last summer, a delegate from the
University of South Carolina
pointed out that many Southern
schools have withdrawn from NSA
because of its civil rights legisla-
tion. By staying in the organiza-
tion, their arguments and votes
against these actions would have
more effectively expressed their
opinions to the country.
In NSA, no resolutions are bind-
ing on member schools, and oppo-
sition of a school can be recorded
in the official minutes.
Miss Backman feels that NSA
disapproval of the disclaimer affi-
davit and loyalty oath provisions
of the National Defense Education
Act was one of the most important
stands take at last summer's Con-
gress. It shows the power of or-
ganized student opinion, though
President Dwight D. Eisenhowers'
support of oath repeal cannot be
traced to NSA activities.
Position Known
The NSA, as a member of the
White House Conference on High-
er Education, made its position
known, but pressure from indi-
vidual colleges was more effective.
The actions on various campuses
and this year's controversy on the
topic stem largely from the air-
ing of ideas at NSA congresses.
Another significant resolution
concerned the banning of nuclear
tests. It was decided that such a
topic was proper for discussion at
the ISC, and this has greatly
broadened the conception of both
groups. "It gets students govern-

S.G.C.
Tonight and Sunday Night
at 7:00 and 9:00
ELIA KAZAN'S
""ON THE
WATERFRONT"
with Marion Brabdo,
Lee J. Cobb, Eva Marie Saint,
Rod Steiger, Karl Malden
ACADEMY AWARD
ARCHITECTURE AUDITOR IUM
50 cents
II

ment away from Just considering
parking problems," Miss Backman
explained.
No school or group of schools
has tended to dominate these
yearly meetings, she continued.
The strength of the particular in-
dividuals who attend each year
determines the effectiveness of the
college in making its opinions
count.
Even in the politicking which
is involved in electing national
officers, there are no alliances
within states or groups of schools
such as the Big Ten or the Ivy
League.
Students Unconcerned
Does NSA matter to the indi-
vidual student? Miss Backman,
acknowledged that it doesn't in
most cases, although she would
like to be of much more influence,
since it deals basically with ideolo-
gies.
"What it is and what it should
be are two different things," she
commented. At present, NSA is a
confederation of student leaders,
but with more student interest it
could be a true confederation of
1,300,000 American students.
The problem of NSA awareness
and interest is complex and is
increased by its distance from the
campus. Even SGC, with its close-
ness to the individual student, has
a great problem of apathy and
lack of information, Miss Back-
man said.

ossible Site
Of New Hall.
Mayor Cecil 0. Creal yesterday
named the S. Fifth Ave. parking
lot as a likely site for the proposed
new city hall.
He said he felt that a "very
small millage increase" would
suffice to finance the structure,
which could be built for substan-
tially less than the $2.5 million
quoted in the Capital Improve-
ment Program report submitted
to the council Monday.
Creal said if the cost of the
structure proved too great or the
people voted down an increase he
would then support the construc-
tion of a new building to house
the police department.
"We definitely in the near future
must face up to the fact that we
must have a new city hall. The
working conditions for many city
department including the detec-
tive, youth and traffic bureaus are
not compatible to efficient opera-
tion."
Creal also mentioned the need
for a new fire station. He said, that
money in the capital improvement
fund and surplus from the general
fund at the end of the fiscal year
should be sufficient for a new fire
station and a fair amount on the
purchase of land for the new city
hall.

.,."DONNA ANDERSON

a man and a woman
gamble their love to fight
organized -Wc,0
the secret
police protect

H ILLEL PRESENTS
RABBI IRWIN GRONER
Asst. Rabbi, Congregation Shaorey Zedek, Detroit
Formerly of Little Rock, Arkansas
In his concluding lecture on
"ARE THE JEWS GOD'S CHOSEN PEOPLE?"
Tuesday, March 15 at 8
Subject: "REINTERPRETATION BY MODERN
JEWISH THINKERS; a Suggested Synthesis"
OPEN TO ALL

!

YOUR
ATTENTION
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DIAL NO 8-6416 in the Annals of Modern Criminology

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COOPER-BESSEMER is one of the
most respected names in the heavy
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are used in the oil, natural gas, chemni-

"You cawn't, cawnt, cawnt mlmiss
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Thursday, March 17... $1.25

leading Mezzo-Soprano of the Metropolitan, La Scala,
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Sun., Mar. 13 at 2:30
PROGRAM: "Una voce poco fa" from "Barber of Seville" (Ros-

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