100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 11, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TION REJECTED:
>fessOr Discusses Imperial Russia

n"

TA PETROSHUS

distrust of gradualism and
. on a day-to-day basis led
nges pursued from a global
of view in imperialist Rus-
Professor Marc Raeff of
College said yesterday.
Russian-born professor dis-
c the state's function from
eign of Peter the Great to
nancipation of the serfs in
seen from the viewpoint of

both the state and the people. He
spoke also of the nature of the
personnel available to the empire
in carrying out its task.
Traditions Rejected
"The traditional approach of
gradual change was rejected in
favor of the rational, and of ac-
tion directed to a specific goal,"
he said. "Peter accomplished
great changes by setting a very
clear goal: imitate the West. He

~I
IFYOU
'NEVER SEE
MER MOON PICTRE

IN
Y'OU

ER RKNISFE
UST SEE ot
TE

did not count on gradual organic
development, but on creating the
situation he wanted."
"Immediate experience with his
reign helped reinforce willingness
to accept the state's lead," he
said.
A "relatively ruthless" leader-
ship, as compared with the French
and English nobility, played a
willful and creative role of ad-
ministration and political action
in overcoming Russia's backward-
ness," Prof. Raeff said.
Nobility Created
"The Russian nobility of the
18th century was created by the
state, because only performance
in state service counted in deter-
mining one's social status, a situ-
ation which continued until the
mid-19th century. Not only the
serfs, but merchants and other
professional groups were left out
of the country's administration;
this is one reason why the 1917
explosion was so dramatic."
"If the nobility had developed
an attitude and tradition of its
own in carrying out its work it
might have been the bridge to
connect the goal-getting func-
tions of the state with everyday
problems," Professor Raeff said.
"But for various reasons this did
not come about, at least not to
the point where it could balance
an autocratic will."
"Thus Russian government
tended to take an all-Russian,
global view of things. There was
not too much concern with prob-
lems of a regional or local nature,
and it took over half a century to
finally establish local offices of
government institutions' particu-
larly important to the daily lives
of the people."

Sororities
Pledge
Rushees
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Due to space
limitations, The Daily was unable
to publish the complete sorority-
pledge list yesterday. Following is
the remainder of the list.)
SIGMA KAPPA
Charlotte Elsie Aupperle, '63;
Judith Ann Bowen, '63; Judith
Ann Burns, '62; Sherrie Lee Cory,
'63; Patricia Ann Culver, '61Ed.;
Joan Margaret Dain, '62; Barbara
Ellen Estes, '63Ed; Jeanne Mary
George, '63; Mary Ann Gerarduzzi,
'62; Lois Sue Heemstra, '61; Patri-
cia Ann Hoffman, '63; Margaret
Ann Holmes, '63; Patricia Ann
Main, '63; Virna Craig Nelly, '63;
Joyce Ann Peterson, '63; Carol
Ann Petroff, '63; Linda Ann Play-
don, '63SN; Jean Katherine Sam-
uelson, '63; Jacklyn Dawn Shaft,
'63; Gloria Jean Shaheen, '62;
Susan Jane Sheppard, '62; Linda
Lou Wells, '63SN; Elizabeth Bass
Wiley, '63.
ZETA TAU ALPHA
Mary Lou Breniser, '63Ph; Bev-
erly Ann Broughton, '62SN; Lu-
anne Cevela, '63; Suzanne De
Pree, '62; Mary Jane Freriks, '63;
Mary Ellen Good, '63SN; Ruth
Ann Greenbury, '63SN; Georgia
Mae Griffith, '63SM; Darlene Es-
ther Helmich, '63; Fredrica Marie
Hotchkiss, '62; Sally Anne Hulse,
'62; Susan Linda Jones, '63; Dor-
orthy McNichol Joss, '61DH; Janet
King, '63; Mary Jo Kitzmiller, '63;
Carolyn Ann Kohn, '63; Sharon
Frida LeVette, '63; Marcia Ann
Matheson, '62A&D; Eugenia Eliza-
beth Pieronik, '63; Joan Emily
Rasmussen, '63SN; Julie Elizabeth
Rasmussen, '63SN; Lorna Dee
Richards, '62; Susan Elizabeth
Schindler, '62; Carol Ann Shep-
herd, '63A&D; Susan Gayle Smith,
'63; Judith Lynn Williams, '63.

DOESN'T GET DIZZY
'U' Conducts Research
On Skater's Balance
By SUSAN HERSHBERG
study is trying to d
Last week researchers at the whether natural athletic
University Medical Center ran some controlling meche
tests on Ronnie Robertson, a fig- the ear'determines h
ure skater who can spin around skater's performance.
400 times and always stop facing For the future, the st
the audience, help astronauts who will
Dr. Brian F. McCabe, instructor weightlessness and the
in otolaryngology, and his co- dis-orientation expected
researcher, Dr. Merle Lawrence, flight.
said the skating star seems to Future research will-
make a "selective supression of ducted on a high-speed:
impulses rising to the brain which platform capable of spee
are generally manifested by physi- 300 rpm and equipped %
cal signs of disorientation." vision and sensitive.-
In other words, "He doesn't get mechanisms.
dizzy.'
Experiments Made
The researchers attempted to *
find whether Robertson is "spot-
ting," or subject to nystagmus-*
erratic eye movements-detectable Notces
during or after rapid spinning.
The skater was spun around campus- Elections: Polls
blindfolded, with his head tilted needed for campus elections
in different positions, and given a 16. sign up for a time andI
headquarters, SAB. Call NO
"caloric examination." This uses cme in after 3 p.m.
hot and cold water to determine
if the semi-circular canals of the Gamma Delta, Lutheran
ear are actually working. club, bowling party, March
Results'indicated that there is 1511 Washtenaw.
no physical quirk, formerly un- Lutheran Student Assoc., g
known, responsible for Robert- meeting, March 11, 7:15 p.m
son's extraordinary balance. His and S. Forest' Ave speaker: z
Deusen, Washington, D.C.
centers of balance in the inner ear
are normal except for one thing: Mich. Christian Fellowsh
he does not get dizzy. study, March 11, 7:15 p.m.,;
Examinations of high speed mo- U. of M. Skating club, end
tion pictures of Robertson at De- skating party. You may brie
troit's Olympia stadium, answered March 11, 8-10 p.m., Coliseu
some of the questions. Congregational Disciples E
dent Guild, discussion by B
Benefits Possible on "Haber-Miller Motion or
Dr. McCabe has studied figure tive Practices," March 11, 12
Thompson.
skaters over the past two years
to find information which could student Governors Conf.
potentially help people who suffer Alumni Assoc. coffee hour. 9:
frommoton ickessandcertain meeting, 10-11:30 a.m., Uv
from motion sickness and League Rumpus Bm. Speak4
ear disorders. Immediately, the Dorr. Dean of Statewide Edu

determine
ability or
anism in
he figure
tudy may
encounter
resulting.
in space
be con-
rotating
eds up to
with tele-
recording
on,
0 Workers
March 15,
place, SO
3-0553 or
student
11, - p.m.,
rad. group
n., Hill St.
Dr. R. Van
hip, Bible
2432 UES.
-of-season
tng guests,
t.
& R stu-
ret Bissell
a Restric-
t"noon, 524
of the
30-10 am.,
March 12.
er: Dr. H.
ucation.

NOW AT

UNITED NATIONS-The Campus United Nations Week is held to
recognize, support anSd make known the principles which guide
the United Nations and discuss the problems facing the member
nations. The activitits of UN Week include seminars, speeches
and a mock assembly.
To Hold Campus UN

NOW

A
cmm

DI AL
NO 5-6290

HELD OVERI
3RD BIG WEEK
"AN ARTISTIC
MILESTONE !"

Prof. Ballis Explains
Russian Studies Program

-MICHIGAN DAILY

NOMINATED FOR TWO ACADEMY
AWARDS AS "BEST ACTRESS"
ELIZABETH KATHARINE MONTGOMERY
TAYLOR - HEPBURN 'CLIFT
1 i
A COLUMIA
a[ J PICTURSU RELE
COMING
"THE MOUSE THAT ROARED"

STARTING
TODAY

DIAL
NO 8-6416

(EDIToR'S NOTE: This is the
third in a five part series on for-
eign studies at the University. Fu-
ture articles willtdeal with Near
Eastern and South Asian studies.)
By RALPH KAPLAN
"The demand for degreesrin
'Russian studies started the pro-
gram," Prof. William Ballis. chair-
man of the committee on the pro-
gram in Russian studies, said.
The government's trouble in
getting personnel with knowledge
of the Russian language and of
the Soviet Union during the wcar
was a great impetus to Russian
studies programs in American'
colleges and universities. Such a
program was begun at the Uni-
versity more thanten years ago,
Prof. Ballis explained.
In addition to language train-
To Provide
Bus Service
Student Government Council's
, spring vacation Willowpolitan
service will be "considerably ex-
panded" over past vacation peri-
ods, Willowpolitan committee'
chairman Daniel Murphy, '63E,
announced recently.
Seven buses will make the run
from Ann Arbor to Willow Run
and Metropolitan airports on
March 25, Murphy announced.
This is more than have run any
previous vacation.
Ticket, applications listing the
times of the runs may be obtained
in all housing units and at the
Student Activities Building. The
price of the trip to Willow Run is
$1.25, and that to Metropolitan,
$1.50.
The applications must be sent
to SOC at their office in the SAB
by March 21 with remittance en-
closed, Murphy said.
The committee is considering
the possibility of running a bus to
return from the airports the eve-
ning of April 3, Murphy said.
To obtain the information neces-
sary to do this, the committee is
requesting all those who order
tickets for the outgoing runs and
would be interested in using such
a return run to write the expected
time of their arrival on April 3
on the back of the application
card.

ing there was a greater need fo:
teachers in Russian studies. The
University's program responded
to this need also.
The departments of economics
geography, history, political sei-
ence aind Slavic languages and
literatures are included in the
program.
Committee Coordinates
Coordinating the Russian of-
ferings in these departments ie
the Committee on the program in
Russian Studies. This committee
has representatives from each de-
partment in the program. The
committee does not administer
the doctoral program but doe:
handle both the bachelor's and
master's degree programs in Rus-
sian studies. Doctoral degrees are
offered by the five departments ir
the program and combine disci-
plinary work in that departmen-
with Russian studies.
The committee has also pro-
moted the increase in Russiar
books in the library which nov
totals 50,000 volumes. Almost hal:
of these have been added in thi
last five years. The library also
subscribes to 300 different Rus-
sian journals and newspapers.
Enrollment, Faculty Increasing
Since the program has begur
the number of faculty in it hae
almost tripled.
Enrollment is also increasing
Twenty master's degrees ant
more than twice that many bach-
elor's degrees have been awarded
since the program began.
All these facts prove that "Rus-
sian studies is coming of age at
the University," Prof. Ballis said
Recent and future course ex-
pansion of the program is a goo
reason for greater interest, he ex-
plained. Two years ago the Uni-
versity began offering an inter-
departmental survey course about
the Soviet Union which is good
for credit in the economics, geog-
raphy, history, political science
and Slavic languages and litera-
partmental plans call for offer
tures departments. Future de
ings in the sociology department
THE
FAR- UT
FOLK
are preparing to invade the
Ann Arbor Armory on Satur-
day, March 19, at 7:30 and
10. "AN EVENING WITH
WIN WELLS" featuring
sonneteer - commenteer
Wells, Jan Winkler (folk-
singer) and themFrank Mor-
relli Quintet (modern jazz
mongers). $2.00 Gen. Adm.
-a Dell 'Arte Promotion--

r
eI
d
d
e
n
e
e
ri
N
f

By CAROLINE DOW
The third annual Campus United
Nations Week will begin with a
kick-off session at 1:30 p.m. Sun-
day in the Union Ballroom.
Speakers at the opening meet-
ing will consider the problems fac-
ing the United Nations.
Prof. J. David Singer of the
political science department will
discuss disarmament.
The implications of UN aid to
emerging nations will be examined
by Prof. Hugh Patrick of the eco-
,nomics department and Prof.
Richard Park, also of the political
science department.
Four SGC-sponsored seminars
will be held in the Undergraduate
Library Honors Lounge at 7:30
p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday and 4:30 p.m. on Friday.
Prof. Samuel Hayes of the eco-
nomics department will seminar
on "The Economic and Social
Development to Underdeveloped'
Countries" on Tuesday. On Wed-
nesday Prof. Edwin Hoyt will dis-
cuss "International Law and Alli-
ances."
"The World Population Prob-
lem" will be examined on Thurs-
day by Prof. Ronald Freedman of
the sociologydepartment.
Prof. Alexander DeConde of the
history department will conclude
the series of seminars on Friday
with a discussion of the "Develop-
ment of American Diplomacy and
the United Nations."
Throughout the week, campus
delegates from over 50 nations
will be researching and preparing
motions for the mock UN Assem-
bly session with the aid of indi-
vidual housing units on campus.
The motions will relate to the
topics of disarmament and UN
aid discussed at the opening
meeting.
The campus UN Assembly will
meet at 10 a.m. Saturday in Rack-

ham Aud. Delegates will leave for
lunch at noon and the session will
resume at 1 p.m.
William Jordan, director of the
political affairs department of the
UN will speak to delegates and
onlookers on "The Changing Role
of the UN" after the session.
Climaxing the week of activities,
Ben C. Limb, Korean minister of
foreign affairs and delegate to the
United Nations, will speak at 8:30
p.m. Saturday in Hill Aud.
JGP ,Opens
Wednesday
The 1960 edition of the Junior
Girls Play, "What Can You Lose?"
will open next Wednesday before
a preview audience of senior wom-
en.
Performances on Thursday
through Saturday nights are open
to the public. Tickets will go on
sale Moonday at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre, play chairmen
Doris Joy and Ann Cromwell an-
nounced yesterday.
"What Can You Lose?" is an
original musical comedy, written
by Susan Huggard. Music, mostly
in contemporary Jazz style was
composed by Brenda Fink and
Anne Wells. Margaret Hayes did
the choreography.
The play revolves around a
wealthy dowager whose home is
invaded by a myriad of orphans,
leading to a "battle of wills" be-
tween the invaders and the de-
fender.
Cast in the play are junior wom-
en Louise Rose, Judy Weinberger,
Freyda Schultz, Shirley Treiber,
Sandra Goetz, Evelyn Cohler, Ce-
cilia Galvin, Kathleen Poswalk and
Gail Saperstein.

DIAMOND NEEDLES
$5.95
One-year guarantee
The DISC Shop
South University Phone NO 3-6922
open evenings
WESTMI NSTER
RECORDS
complete catalogue
monaural $2.98

B'NAI B'RITH H1 LLEL FOUNDATION
1429 H ill Street
SABBATH SERVICES,
Commemorating PURIM
Tonight, Fri., Mar. 11, 7:15 P.M.
in
ZWERDLI NG-COH N CHAPEL
Sponsored by Sigma Alpha Mu Fraternity

open evenings

a

NAaA RittaV F
UN O N--WG0 . r

<< ND ,ba . J

pOM 1GrOaph'l
1.' 311iat

pYNA'MtiY C

"CU Ap AtE G

s
.G
dTONIGHT at 7 and 9
THOR HEYERDAHL'S
plus
''THE TITAN''
(life of ,Michelangelo)
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
at 7:00 and 9:00
ELIA KAZAN'S
""ON THE
WATERFRONT"
with
Ma~rlon Rrrnnrfr .Lee JICob.hhEva Mrie Srint_

stereo

$3.98

I

The DISC Shop
1210 South University Phone NO 3-6922
all
RCA VICTOR
LIVING STEREO
1each
(PLEASE READ FINE PRINT)
When you buy another
RCA Victor Stereo
record in the same
orice coateorv

me

............

I

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street

PRESENTS AN EVENING OF JEWISH MUSIC
SUNDAY, MAR. 13 at8 in ZWEkDLING-COHN CHAPEL

Participan ts
WARREN JAWORSKI -Baritone
(Soloist, Glee Club)
HENRY SHEVITZ - Pianist

I

11

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan