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February 05, 1960 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

LUSTRALIA:
National, Private Development Push Industry

' ' , .

By The Associated Press
SYDNEY, Australia-Bounding
ional and private development
switched Australia from a ba-
ally primary producer to a high-
industrialized nation in less
n two decades.
Vew industrial plants, new mm-
1l discoveries, and new develop-
nt of naturalnresources have
inged the face of the country
ce the outbreak of World War
kustralia, a country which only
years ago made its first mass-
duced automobile, is now pro-
ing jet aircraft, guided mis-
s, diesel-electric locomotives
I is becoming an increasingly
portant exporter of manufac-
ed goods. Its factory output,
idrupled since the end of World

War II, is now worth around 10
billion dollars annually.
Nearly a third of its four mil-
lion workers are employed in in-
dustry-toe same proportion as
in the United States.
Recent major mineral discover-
ies, especially in the tropical north,
have transformed Australia's eco-
nomic outlook. Some economists
foresee the possibility of minerals
ousting the traditional wool as
Australia's main export earner.
At Weipa, on the western shores
of Cape York Peninsula, two huge
bauxite deposits - among the
world's largest-were discovered
three years ago. They are esti-
mated to contain 400 million tons
of bauxite, the raw material from
which aluminum is made.
Australia is already expanding
the first aluminum plant in the

Southern Hemisphere (at Bell
Bay, Tasmania) and plans a new
plant to develop the Weipa depos-
its. The Rum Jungle (Northern
Territory) and Mary Kathleen
(Queensland) uranium fields are
producing about 1,000 tons of ura-
nium oxide a year.
Oil is the only mineral of con-
sequence not being produced in
commercial quantities. So far, 158
million dollars has been spent on
the search for oil, much of it by
American and British companies.
Most spectacular of Australian
development projects is the bil-
lion - dollar Snowy Mountain
Scheme. This diverts the waters
of the Snowy River, which runs
into the sea at Australia's south-
east extremity, westward through
a series of tunnels through the

water-short but fertile Australian
inland.
The 20-year scheme, now aboutl
half completed, will make avail-i
able an extra two million acre-
feet of water annually for irriga-a
tion. This will increase the area
under irrigation by 1,000 square
miles and raise value of food pro-
duction by 67 million dollars.
In addition, it will provide three1
million kilowatts, almost doublingt
Australia's present power-generat-
ing capacity.
In Victoria, where 22-billion ton
brown coal (lignite) deposits havei
earned the Latrobe Valley the tag1
of "Australia's Ruhr," a 270-mil-I
lion-dollar project is doubling gen-
erating capacity in the valley to
2,400,000 kilowatts.
Steel Rising
The Australian steel industry,
which is among the world's lowest-I
cost producers, has more than
doubled ingot production over the.
past decade to nearly 31 million
tons annually.
In the non-ferrous metals in-
dustries, heavy , expansion is
planned to make Mt. Isa (Queens-
land) the biggest copper mine in
the world, and to double the capa-
city of a 30,000-ton electrolytic
copper refinery now nearing com-
pletion at Mt. Isa's seaport of
Townsville.
New capital investment in man-
ufacturing industry has risen
steadily from 333 million in 1953-
54 to 450 million dollars in 1958-
59. Official forecasts say that 1959-
60 should be another record and
that this trend should continue.
Investment Up
Heaviest expansion is in the en-
gineering and vehicle industries,
where 186 million dollars in plants
and equipment were added last
year.
Balance of new capital invest-
ment was in textiles and clothing
31 million, food, drink and to-
bacco 74 million, paper and print-
ing 36 million, chemicals and oil
reflning 58 million, and other
manufacturing 65 million.
The motor vehicle industry,
which produced the first Austral-
ian-made car in 1948, plans fur-
ther expansion, although capacity
is expected to exceed demand for
some years. The British Motor
Corp. has just finished a 29 mil- I
lion dollar e pansion program.
Chrysler, Ford, General Motors-
Holden, Volkswagen and other
companies are increasing their
capacity and total value of works
in hand is almost 112 million dol-
lars.
To cope with her expanded in-
dustries, Australia is refurbishing
her transport system. Railroads,
built in the pre-1900 days when
Australia consisted of rival col-
onies, are hampered by breaks of
gauge at state borders.
Add Track
But work is proceeding on a 22-
million-dollar scheme to lay a
standard (4' 8',") track fromI

Since the end of World War II,
Australia has attracted 1% mil-
lion migrants, about half of them
under assisted passage schemes.
British migrants, who comprise
nearly half total new arrivals, pay
only $22.40 for the month-long
voyage to Australia.
Next in numbers to British mi-
grants are Italians (188,000),
Dutch (107,000), Poles (74,000),
Germans (65,000) and -Greeks
(61,000).
Some migrants have gone home
-and some Australians have gone
abroad--but since the war there
has been a net migration gain of
more than a million.
This with the natural increase
has lifted the population from 7.4
million at the end of the war to
10 million today.
To Register
Reading Class
Registration for the next series
of reading improvement classes
will be held from 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. today and from 8:30 a.m. till
noon tomorrow, in Rm. 524 of the
University Elementary School.
One-half hour will be required
for the registration process. Fur-
ther information can be obtained
from the University Reading Serv-
ice.

Regents Give
Six Officials
'U' Positionas
The Regents approved six ap-
pointments at their last meeting.
William R. Murchie was ap-
pointed to the Flint College exec-
utive committee for the second
semester of 1959-60 to replace
Frederick H. Test, who will be on
leave.
On the Institute for Human
Adjustment executive committee,
Robert S. Fox was appointed for
a term ending February 28, 1962,
to succeed Glenn Ludlow, who re-
signed.
There were two appointments
to the executive board of the
graduate school. Nathan Sinai
was named for the term of Feb-
ruary 8, to September 1, 1960 to
succeed Dr. Franklin D. Johnston,
now on leave. Paul J. Alexander
was named for the same term to
replace George Kish, who also will
be on leave.
The appointment of Herschel
Weil as an associate professor of
electrical engineering was ap-
proved. His appointment is for a
period of two and one-half years.
William W. Morgan, 4 member
of the Yerkes Observatory staff
since 1927, has been appointed a
senior research scientist in the
University Institute of Science
and Technology for two months,
beginning May 15, 1960.

# }. ..,... .................. }.f .f" .. ..f" . ..f"fMi}}.. } . t* "* SS S* .".._., *
ie
DIAMOND CHAIN COMPANY, INC.
a Subsidiary of American Steel foundries
402 Kentucky Avenue
indianapolis 7, IndIana
Diamond,for67years, has manufactured finished
steel ;roller chains, sprockets, and flexible shaft
couplings.
These are sold to over 3000 customers repre-
sented in 125 different industries.
Planned expansion of technical and sales staff
make more opportunities available for graduates
in these areas:
*0MECHANICAL
* ELECTRICAL
* METALLURGY
Openings in sales, plant layout and processes,
design of special machines, production and qual-
ity control, special product design, application
research, heat treating equipment and processes.

f

INTERVIEWS ON FEBRUARY 10, 1960
CAMPUS, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Please register with your Placement Director
for time and literature.

DIAMOND~i4
ROLLER CHAINS
er.i' i'i'Mr y - * . .. .. .. ............ ...... . . . . . . . e

FEINER GLASS & PAINT CO.

216 W. William Street

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Telephone NO 8-8014

We Have All Kinds of Glass-Mirrors and Furniture Tops
We Have the Nationally Advertised Paints
Also, we have complete glass service for foreign cars.
Free Parking in Front of Our Store
WE HAVE BEEN SERVING THE COMMUNITY FOR 74 YEARS

Melbourne to the N.S.W. border.
This will give one unbroken gauge
over the busiest sector of Aus-
tralian railroads, from Melbourne
to Brisbane.
Conscious of fast-increasing pop-
ulation pressures from Asian coun-
tries to her near north, and to
meet manpower demands of ex-
panding industries, Australia has
undertaken one of the world's
most ambitious migration pro-
grams.

iwi

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