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March 04, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-03-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Eisenhower
Tour Calle

Return Delayed;

d1

Personal

Overseas Chinese Troubled

4'

By BERNARD GAVZER
associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
The label they put upon them-
selves--hua chiao-is a key to the
trouble overseas Chinese are hav-
ing in Southeast Asia.
the terms translates "soJourning
Chinese" and it applies even
though many of the Chinese have
been away from their homeland
for generations.
This attitude of apartness has
fed the rising resentment shown
against resident Chinese from
Burma to Manila.

Coupled with the recent trend
toward independence and violent
nationalism, the anti-Chinese ac-
tion has ranged from social un-
popularity to outright economic
and political restrictions.
Chinese Overseas
The accompanying rap profiles
the distribution of Overseas Chi-
nese. The figures for each country
show the number of overseas Chi-
nese compared with the number
of native population.
In Hong Kdng, the Chinese -
swelled by a refugee flood from

"RICHLY LACED WITH WIT
AND HUMOR.. . ATOUCHING
UNFORGETTABLE DRAMA!"
--Cue Mogazine

mINCIS RFAT n

1

the Red China mainland-out-
number all others by 9 to 1.
But in most other places, the
Philippines, South Viet Nam,
Burma, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia
and Indonesia, they are strongly
outnumbered.
Because of their formidable ca-
pacity for work and their enor-
mous success in commerce and
trade, the overseas Chinese gen-
erally are well heeled. In Malaya,
the Chinese have vast holdings in
trucking, buses, tin mining, rub-
ber.
In Thailand, they own most of
the retail shops, rice and timber
mills. In the Philippines, they have
dominant roles in domestic and
foreign commerce.
Singapore Split
Singapore provides an excellent
example of the difficulties of the
13 million overseas Chinese scat-
tered through Southeast Asia. An
island-city without a country, it
moved to semi-independence from
British rule last June.
The ruling People's Action Party
seeks an eventual merger into the
Federation of Malaya.
Malayans have been cool to the
idea. Chinese make up 40 per cent
of the present Malayan population
of six million. If Singapore with
its 1,260,000 Chinese was to come
into the federation, this popula-
tion ratio would change consider-
ably.
Nationalists Face Issue
To the Nationalist Chinese as
well as the Fed Chinese, the hua
chiao have been a problem. In its
early days the Communists gave
them strong support but then--
deciding they needed the friend-
ship of Southeast Asia nations-
Red China urged the Overseas
Chinese to be loyal to the nations
in which they live.
Recently, Peking made an about-
face and now steadfastly defends
the overseas Chinese.a
The Nationalists, also needing
friends in the Fast East, have been
hesitant about aiding the hua
chiao. But on the other hand,
they do not want to offend them
and thus lose the possible loyalty
of these people.

Plane Lands
With Engine
Shut Off
President Switched
To Duplicate Jet
RAMEY AIR FORCE BASE,
Puerto Rico (A- Engine oiling
trouble, developing over the Ama-
zon junges of Brazil, delayed
President Dwight D. Eisenhower's
flight homeward yesterday from
his South American goodwill tour.
Eisenhower's silver and orange
Boeing 707 jet landed safely at
Paramaribo, a refueling stop on
his journey from Buenos Aires to
Puerto Rico, with the No. 4 engine
cut off.
Paramaribo is In Surinam, the
area once called Dutch Guiana,
on the north coast of South
America.
Shifted t New Jet
The President's pilot, Col. Wil-
liam G. Draper, decided to shift
Eisenhower and his party to a
duplicate jet that trailed in from
Buenos Aires. The switch extend-
ed to nearly two hours a layover
originally scheduled to take only
one.
The President headed here for
three days of rest in the wake of
the tour, a tremendous personal
success whatever its hemispheric
aftermaths.
Eisenhower looked forward to a
weekend of golf in Puerto Rico
after winding up his single-hand-
ed effort to stem the tide that
has been turning against the
United States in South America.
Reception Warm
His visit - aptly named "Oper-
ation Amigo" - was marred by
a couple of anti-United States
demonstrations that brought out
the tear gas, but these were over-
shadowed by warmth of his re-
ception by the vast majorities in
Brazil, Argentina, Chile and Uru-
guay.
Eisenhower wound up his tour
in a flurry of activity in Monti-
video, the Uruguayan capital, and
at Buenos Aires' international
airport in cool, breezy weather
yesterday morning.
He took off from the latter field
in his jet for Ramey Air Force
Base in Puerto Rico and three
days of rest and relaxation in
the Caribbean commonwealth be-
fore flying on to Washington.
Declaration Issued
Just before Eisenhower left
Uruguay, he and President Ben-
ito Nardone issued a joint "Dec-
laration of Montevideo," defining
basic principles that "govern the
international relations of their
respective peoples and inspire the
ideal of freedom which binds
them."
They repudiat'ed all forms of
anti-democratic actions, pledged
adherence to the principle of non-
intervention in the affairs of oth-
er American nations and agreed
to use their efforts to increase
social, economic and cultural co-
operation.

Student Association Protest
Gaining National Sympathy

MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (JP) -
Uruguayan officials yesterday min-
imized the violent clashes that
took place Wednesday between
police and students along Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower's mo-
torcade route.
One official said the riots were'
the "work of just a handful of
hot-headed youngsters with a left-
ward leaning so common in young
people."
Police used guns, sabres, fire
hoses and tear gas to quell demon-
strators who barricaded themselves
in university buildings and shouted
and flaunted slogans against
"Yankee Imperialism" and for
Cuba's Prime Minister Fidel Cas-
tro.
Fighting Breaks Out
One student was wounded by a
shot in the foot, another got a
sabre cut and President Eisen-
hower got a sniff of the tear gas
that started him to rubbing his
eyes.
There was no indication of Com-
munist Party support behind the
demonstrators. Communist leaders
had announced before Eisenhow-
er's visit that they welcomed the
tour.
Uruguay prides itself on politi-
cal freedom and has not outlawed
the party. The Soviet embassy
keeps a big staff here-about 80
persons.

Uruguayans Call Student-Police Rioting Minim

(Continued from PageI)

U m

HELD
OVER

Officials expressed belief the were "expressions of a high anti- Nardone's plan calls for
demonstrators chiefly were stu- imperialist conscience." pinching in order to straight
dents sympathetic to Castro and Uruguay, as a country of easy the economy. It involves bala
who oppose the closer economic and cultured living, is proud of its
ties with the United States the record of not having a revolution the budget, and curbing gc
present government is seeking. in more than 50 years. As a result ment expenditures.
Benito Nardone, president of the of advanced welfare programs a The economic situation m
National Council who took over worker can retire at 50 on full pay. the work of agitators easier
leadership of the government the But the peso, worth 55 cents 12 the Communists got only
day before Eisenhower arrived, is years ago, has been hit by infla- cent of the vote in the last
reported to have requested a loan tion and is now worth 9 cents. tion, and seated only two an
of some 200 million dollars from People are feeling the pinch of the the 99-member house of z
the United States to bolster his rising cost of living. sentatives.
plans for national economic re-
covery.
Some signs waved by the dem-
onstrators protested "delivering PEACEMAKERS P N I
Uruguay to the International
Monetary Fund." (Anti-Military Ball)
Clash in University
The students who barricaded.HUSSEY ROOM
themselves in the architecturalHUSYR O
college, where the worst clash took MICH IGAN LEAGUE
place, were identified as about 50
members of a Trotskyite group--
apart from regular Communists
who look to Moscow. About 400 Fri., March 4, 9-12 informal
students were reported to have
barricaded themselves in the main
university building.
All Montevideo newspapers re- "A VOTRE PLAISIR"
ported the riots, but all omitted
editorial Comment, except the Com- a
munist El Popular, which charger
El P sad the diore THEATRE-RESTAURANT presents "THRUST AND PARRY"

M=

DIAL
NO 5-6290

is one in which the entire nation
is involved. Hopefully this country
can meet it with but a tenth part
the courage which you have dem-
onstrated. Your firm but passive
resistance in the face of the in-
dignities to which you were sub-
jected and your continued refusal
to accept many well-meaning of-
fers of bail command our respect
and that of the millions of stu-
dents we represent. You have given
us much to be proud of, in return
we pledge our further support in
any way which you may request
or which may be possible.
Expresses Shock
The Association's telegram to
Mayor West and Police Commis-
sioner Hosey expressed "shock at
the actions of Nashville police and
city officials" and said the Associ-
ation "protests Saturday's gross
miscarriage of justice in the arrest
without provocation of 100 Ameri-
can students engaged in non-vio-
lent protest of unfair discrimina-
tion in your city."
The telegram continued, "You,
as an officer of public trust, have
erred greviously not only in ful-
filling your obligations to the citi-
zens of Nashville, but also to the
people of this country and to the
ideals of our republic, which you
have blasphemed. You have of-
fered yourselves for judgment be-
fore the people of this nation and
the world, and you shall receive
it.':
Call for Release
The telegram also called for the
immediate release of the students
and "assurance that such injustice
will not be tolerated in the
future."
Among the schools sending pro-
test and support.telegrams are
Lehigh University, Muhlenberg,
Chatham and Lafayette colleges
in Pennsylvania; Wayne State
University, the University of Mich-

igan, Flint, Ferris and Marygrove
colleges in Michigan; St. Bene-
dict's College in Kansas and Cen-
tral Missouri College in Missouri.
Also Douglas, Rutgers, Newark
State College, Fairleigh Dickinson,
and Trenton State College in New
Jersey; The University of Wash-
ington and Washington State Col-
lege, the University of Texas,
Xavier University in New Orleans,
Reed College in Portland, the
University of California at Berke-
ley'
The University of Minnesota
branches at both Duluth and
Minneapolis, Bethel, St. Cather-
ine, McAlester, Hamline and Augs-
burg collgees in the Minnesota
and Dakota area; and the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin.
At the University of Wisconsin
a telegram booth was set up and
as money poured in from Wiscon-
s= t students telegrams of protest
were sent to Senators Kefauver
and Gore, and to the Governors of
six southern states.
Telegrams were also sent on be-
half of the Minnesota-Dakotas,
Utah, and Michigan regions of
USNSA.
Students involved in standing
strikes will carry signs protesting
the Nashville arrests and express-
ing sympathy for the sit-in move-
ment.
According to Miss Connie Curry,
USNSA Southern staff member
who has been in close contact with
the Nashville students, a state-
ment has been issued by Daine
Nash, student spokesman for the
group, correcting certain inaccura-
cies in coverage of the Nashville
incident.
In their statement the students
stressed' the fact that they were
released on their word in the cus-
tody of school officials and not, as
was reported, on $100 bail each.
"If there had been any money
involved we would have refused,"
Miss Nash said.

NOMINATED FOR TWO ACADEMY
AWARDS AS "BEST ACTRESS"
uABETH KATHARINE MONTGOMERY
TAYWR."H EPBURN C U FT
-
bwd an IM oiy nDmted by lPdrdrbp
TENNESSEE WIAMS * JOSEPH L MANKIEWCZ SAM SPIEGEL

Second Front Page

Friday, March 4, 1969

Page 3

I

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ilz

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