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March 03, 1960 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-03-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1960

TIlE MICIHGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MARCH 3,1960
S S

Today 4:10

Department of Speech

MAETERLI NCK'S

"THE INTRUDER"

Arena Theatre

No admission charge

S.G.C.
TONIGHT and tomorrow
at 7:00 and 9:00
ACADEMY AWARD WINNING
1"Mutin on the Bounty"
with
CLARK GABLE CHARLES LAUGHTON
FRANCHOT TONE
The story of history's most famous mutiny provides
the occasion for Laughton's renowned performance
as the sadistic Captain Bligh.
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
at 7:00 and 9:00
Anita loos' sophisticated classic
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes"
with"
MARILYN MONROE JANE RUSSELL
in color
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

To Discuss
Soviet Visit
John Scott, special assistant to
the publisher of Time magazine.
will speak on "Russia Revisited"
today at 3 p.m. in Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
The talk is sponsored by the
journalism department and the
committee on the Russian studies
program.
Scott has recently returned from
a four-month trip to Russia and
the satellite countries.
TISK SAYS.
\
MECRIAN BLLOGEN
Don't end up like
Bellbogei !
Get your tickets now.
LOUIS
ARMSTRONG
and
HIS ALL STARS
March 5 Hill Aud.
1:15 and 9:30 P.M.
Tickets on sale
at Hill Box Office
1-5 P.M. weekdays
(Plenty of good seats
available)
$1 25-$175-$2.00

Feature One-Act Play
Today by Maeterlinck

By MAME JACKSON
"The Intruder," a one-act play
by Maurice Maeterlinck, will begin
this semester's Laboratory Playbill

6cro'44 CampoA

LABORATORY PLAYBILL:

I

Prof. Stephen S. Fox of the psy-
chology department will speak at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow in Aud. B,
Angell Hall, on "Sensory Depriva-
tion and Maintained Sensory In-
put in the Monkey"
The talk is one of a series of
psychology colloquia.
Travelogue
The picture story of "Israel,
Land of the Bible" will be the
third in the Burton Holmes travel-
ogue series presented tonight at
8:30 pm. in Hill Aud.
Israel is at the cross-roads of
three continents; it is sacred to
three of the world's great religions
and the cradle of the Western
world. It contains the relics of ten
civilizations.
The last few years has been
great industrial development and
reclamation of land from the
desert and the provision of a new
life for countless immigrants.
The movie, narrated by Robert
Mallett, will tell both stories.
* * *
Movie Today
Cinema Guild will present
the film "Mutiny on the Bounty"
at 7 and 9:15 tonight in the Archi-
tecture Auditorium. The academy
award-winning picture stars Clark
Gable, Charles Laugton and Fran-
chot Tone.
Students Laud
Exchange Plan
From "Student World"
ITALY - As a part of an ex-
change program between the Uni-
versities of Edinborough (Scot-
land), Gottingen (Germany),
Skoplje (Yugoslavia) and Turin
(Italy), three students from Edin-
burgh visited the University of
Turin in January.
Three Turin students had al-
ready visited Edinburgh, Gottin-
gen and Skoplje in November, and
had spoken in very positive terms
of their experiences and of the
possibilities for getting adquainted
with students of the host univer-
sities.
* C *
JAPAN - The employment out-
look for Japanese students of
leading universities who are ex-
pected to graduate in March is
the brightest in years.
Indications are that all gradu-
ates of such schools will find em-
ployment-unprecedented in post-
war Japan.
ODETTA
FOLK MUSIC
March 18 at 8:30
Detroit institute of Arts
Auditorium
Tickets at
THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University NO 3-6922

Series at 4:10 p.m. today in the1
Arena Theatre at the Frieze Bldg.
"Maeterlinck, the Belgian poet-
dramatist of the late nineteenth
century, deals with the intangible,
not the obvious in his plays,"
Joyce Moffat, play director said.
"His drama is static rather than
dynamic theatre. His ideal is to
create mood, not action."
"Our biggest problem was in
creating Maeterlinck's appropriate
mood in an arena situation." A
mood of apprehension is created
in this production through sound
and scenery effects.
A "lyric quality" is produced by
using cheesecloth and transparent
materials in the aisles of the
theatre. Tension builds up through
the sound effects of a scyth being
sharpened, a clock ticking and a
child screaming.
Passive Acceptance
"The Intruder" was Maeter-
linck's first play. Its thesis is that
man accepts passively the dealings
of fate." Maeterlinck expresses his
concepts of death, blindness and
immortality through the character
of a blind grandfather in this
play.
Peter Goldfarb, '63, will portray
the grandfather. Other players ae
Ann Hagemann as the daughter.
Dave Harris, '62 as the fathe,
James Knowlton, '61, as the uncle
and Cecile Weinstein, '61, playing
the maidservant.
"When the play begins the fam-
for news of the wife's condtion,
ily is sitting downstairs waiting
for six weeks previous to the open-
ing time of the play, the wife had
given birtheto a child, and she had
not yet recovered.
'Intruder' Is Death
The grandfather, apprehensive
that all is not well, is the only
one to comprehend the approach
of the Intruder, Death. In this
production the personified death
.will take the form of a shaft of
light.
"The maidservant enters to an-
nounce the death of the mother,
and at the moment of her death
her baby utters his first sounds-
piercing screams of terror."
Resigned to the mother's death,
everyone leaves except the Grand-
father who remains on stage to
struggle with his soul.
Thomas Seeks
Spending Shift
"The proportion of money spent
on Cadillacs compared with the
proportion of money spent on
decent housing or schools is not
pleasant to contemplate; and I
have no feelings against General
Motors," Norman Thomas, six-
time national presidential candi-
date on the Socialist Party ticket
said recently.
Thomas will appear today on
"Background," over WUOM at
8 p.m. The discussion will center
around the role of labor in our
society, the history of the Socialist
Party and a review of the Socialist
aims which have become incor-
porated into American life.
Disarmament and civil rights
are listed as the major issues of
the 1960 Presidential campaign by
Thomas. He said that the solving
of these problems is a matter of
dedication, mostly on the part of
today's young people.

ANTHROPOLOGY LECTURE:
Hsu Contrasts U.S.-Chinese Cultures

By HENRY LEE
"Cultural differences between
China and the United States are
important in determining human
behavior," Prof. Francis L. K. Hsu
said yesterday.
Hsu, chairman of the Anthro-
pology department at Northwest-
ern University, said that the Chi-
nese culture is based on mutual.
dependence while the American
culture is based on self reliance.
In China a son's first 30 years
of life are judged by his father's
status, and the next 30 years, the
father's status is judged by his
son's.
"If a father is unsuccessful
while young, and his son attains
great success later, the father will
be quite proud and tell everybody
about it."
Touchy About Situation
Americans who are individual-
ly-centered, would be very touchy
in this situation, he continued,
and would try to hide the fact
that their children are support-
ing them.
Hsu noted that differences In
art and literature show how cul-
ture operates in American and
Chinese societies. These differ-
ences distinguish the East from
the West.
"Chinese art minimizes the hu-
man form and does not convey
any deep emotional significance.
In America, even the pictures of
apples, bananas, and grapes pos-
sess emotion because the artist
Guy Carawan
To Perform
With guitar, banjo, and flute,
Guy Carawan carries on his fam-
ily tradition of folk-singing.
The first performer ever to be
sponsored by the University Folk-
lore Society,'he just started re-
cording and appearing on the
stage in just the last few years.
Carawan will perform at 8 p.m.
tomorrow at the Trueblood Audi-
torium in the Frieze Building. Ad-
mission is $1.25 or $1.00 for mem-
bers of the Folklore Society.
Carawan heard his first folk
singing at college parties in Los
Angeles, and he got his first guitar
while still in college.
Folk-singing, which started out
as a hobby, linked the interests of
the sociology major to the talents
of the music-lover in him.
Using his MA in sociology as a
pretext, he toured the mountains
of Tennessee and North Carolina
in the summer of 1952 with two
friends.
He sings love songs, children's
songs, ballads, and spirituals from
the traditions of country farmers,
mountaineers, and city-dwelling
singers.
I. 'A

''

has endowed these forms with his
'soul'."
The professor said that Chinese
literature does not deal with the
sex life of the individual. The
plots must always end with the
correct solution. The.. American
or Western literature deals with
sex, romance and emotion.
Culture Affects Religion
"Culture also affects other be-
liefs such as religion," Hsu stat-
ed. If religion does a Chinaman
no good ,why should he join it.
To Americans, religion always re-
mains something real.
TH E JOHN BARTON
WOLGAMOT PLAYERS
in
Jarry's savage burlesque
UBU ROI
(Gopotty Rex)
"The Surrealists invented
nothing better."
-Andri Gide
SAT. & SUN., MARCH 5 & 6
8:30 P.M. Admission 95c
Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg.
Buy tickets at Bob Marshall's

Hsu mentioned that there are
exceptions in every society to
these cultural patterns. "But we
must assume the basic ideas in
each culture are internally con-
sistent before any other assump-
tions can be made."
DIAL NO 5-6290
NOMINATED FOR TWO
"BEST ACTRESSES"
ACADEMY AWA RDS
EUZASEI KAThRNE MWUOMT
TAYLWR HEPBURN CUFT
Satioflq yb Tifte by PO&dua4
TENNESSEE JOSEPH L ,SAM
WIAMS " MAMKIEWIUC- SPIECKL
Our Next Attraction
will be
"The Mouse That Roared"

I

1

.t

ANNOUNCEMENT
You may now purchase your

Of ficial

University of Michigan Ring

at

DOUGLAS H. HARRIS
1311 South University - Ann Arbor

it

E

ENDING DIAL
TODAY NO 2-626
C. S. Forester's great human drama
and true adventure !

14

BURTONTRAELOGUE
HOLMES
ISRAEL / and 4(the &61e
Color Motion Pictures of the Holy Land
Narrated by ROBERT MALLETT
TONIGHT at 8:30
Tickets: $1.00 (Main Floor, Reserved)
50c (Balcony, Unreserved)
On Sale Today 10 A.M.-8:30 P.M.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

11 1

I

PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

HILL AUDITORIUM

J

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p~m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1960
VOL. LXX, NO. 113
General Notices
Tonight: Richard Wagner's opera,
"Das Rheingold," presented by the De-
partment of Speech and the School of
Music. Box office open 10 a.m. Perform-
ance 8:00 p.m.
Students who expect to receive Edu-
cation and Training Allowances un-
der Public Law 550 (Korean G.I. Bill) or
Public Law 634 (Orphan's Bill) must
sign MONTHLY CERTIFICATION, VA
Form VB7-6553, in the Offices of veter-
ans Affairs, 142 Administration Bldg.,
before 3:30 p.m., Fri., Mar. 4. Office
hours are: 8:30-11:15 a.m. and 1:15-3:30
p.m.
Sigma Xi Initiation Dinner. Wed.,
March 9 at 6:15 p.m. in the Ballroom,
Mich. League. Spouses invited. Checks
should be mailed in by Sat., March 5
to Sigma Xi, Rackham Bldg.
Burton Holmes Travelogue "Israel"
tonight at 8:30 in Hlil Aud. Robert
Mallett will narrate the color motion
pictures which cover the Biblical spots
of the Holy Land as well as the mod-
ern developments of the new nation
of Israel. Tickets are on sale today 10
a.m.-8:30 p.m. in the Aud. box office.
(Continued on Page 4)

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IRANCOIS IRUfFAUT'S

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An important break-through in Salem's

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