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February 26, 1960 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-26

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,TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26,1960

#\

TWO THE MffCI!IGAN DAILY FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26. ~96O

PAUL BUNYAN BALL

Intellectual Dishonesty

Square Dancing 8-9
Round Dancing 9-12
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
8-12

HILLEL CHOIR
Organization Meeting and Rehearsal
Sunday, Feb. 28, 5 P.M.
in Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel
For all interested
Fine opportunity to participate in
Sabbath Services and Group Functions
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street

ll

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The fol-
lowing statement was drafted
by the Student Committee on
Honesty, a group of 10 literary
college seniors investigating stu-
dent behavior at the request of
the College's Administrative
Board. All comments and in-
quiries should be addressed to
the committee, 1220 Angel
Hall.)
A good number of students
do not know what intellectual
dishonesty means. Besides
those who are flagrantly cheat-
ing, there are a good many fine
students who, unknowingly, ore
dishonest.
And this matters. It matters
not only to the faculty but also
to the students. Our intention
is to clarify to the second, larg-
er group what cheating is and
to make clear to both groups
the moral implications and
practical consequences of aca-
demic dishonesty.
Conscious Cheating

Conscious
spontaneous
The former

cheating is either
or pre-meditated.
occurs when the

HAL HOLBROOK

"MARK TWAIN TONIGHT!"
POSTPONED
TO APRIL 12, 8:30 P.M.
Tickets issued for February 27 will be honored April 12.

PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

HILL AUDITORIUM

student in a test situation sud-
denly finds he can't remember
an answer, becomes "clutched,"
and looks on his neighbor's
work.
On the other hand, pre-
meditated cheating includes
bringing notes into an exam
or setting up any type of crib-
bing system which obtains the
answers illegally.
"Dry labbing" or having one's
paper or exam written by
someone else are other ex-
amples. In this last case, both
the student who writes the
paper and the one for whom it
is being written are guilty of
dishonesty.
Unintentional
What bothers the faculty
and students as much as this
"conscious" kind of deception
are the group of students who
think they're being honest but
actually are developing- them-
selves.
Such a student is one who
though understanding it is
Undergraduate
Men are
needed . .
to serve in an experiment
for 1 1 hours. Pay $2.00.
Please call Mrs. Strong
rHO 341511
Ext. 2651
or send postcard with
name, address, phone and
hours available to her at
6627 Haven Hall.

wrong to carry notes into anI
exam fails to see that memor-
izing an old quiz before the
test is comparable. He falls into
dishonesty since he uses the
exam knowing that the ques-
tions on the test will be re-
peated.
Using old material for re-
view purposes or for familiar-
izing oneself with the instruc-
tor's testing method is not
wrong. Certain professors en-
courage this as it tends to put
the student more at ease before
the exam.
Plagiarism Wrong
Equally ignorant is the stu-
dent who unconsciously plag-
iarizes. A student knows that
plagiarism is turning in some
other work as his own. How-
ever, it also includes failing to
give credit to the source of any
ideas the student has used in
a paper.
Reading a critic before writ-
ing a paper is fine. This is good
scholarship. If the student,
though, wants to incorporate
verbatim something another
author has written, quotation
marks must be used and the
source cited.
Being Light-Fingered'
If the student prefers to
paraphrase, using his own
words to describe an author's
idea, it is still essential that he
mention that this is the critic's
thinking and not his own.
By not doing so, the student
is being, as one member of the
faculty put it, "lightfingered
with ideas." And being "light-
fingered with ideas" could lead
one student to ask another for
a paper which can be copied.
This is also dishonest.
A final example of this naive
cheating is submitting the
same paper to more than one
instructor without their con-
sent.
It must be remembered that
a list like this cannot possibly
be complete. Were it complete,
our intentions might be con-
strued as instructive rather
than constructive by some mis-
guidetd students. Rather it is
our intent to illustrate what is
generally considered as cheat-
ing, i.e., the student's present-
ing someone else's work or
thinking as his own or his at-
tempt in any manner to de-
ceive.
Consequences Serious
What are the practical con-
sequences of cheating? A lit
school student found cheating
will be brought before the
College Administration Board
which consists of both faculty
and students. There, the stu-
dent may get an E on the
paper or exam. Or, he may get
an E in the course with the
notation on his transcript that
it was "by action of the Ad-
ministrative Board." Lastly, he
could be suspended from
school.
There is a growing tendency

among members of the faculty
to view the student-course re-
lationship on a contractual
basis. That is, when registering
for a course the student under-
takes the obligation to com-
plete the work with full integ-
rity. In so doing, he fulflls not
only his intellectual contract
with the professor but also one
of mutual trust with the other
students.
And if any student fails to
uphold his obligations, no mat-
ter how excellent his past rec-
ord, that person has broken
this "contract" and will receive
at least an "E" in the exam
and, more than likely, an E in
the course.
Furthermore, you can't wipe
out the fact that a person who,
whether now or later, is viewed
as being weak in character will
not be held in full esteem by
his friends and associates.
There is, then, nothing ex-
pedient about cheating. In the
short run, the student may be
caught. In the long run, his
actions are going to catch up
with him.
Ethics Paramount
The ethical implications of
cheating are of the highest im-
portance. Without any qualifi-
cation, dishonesty in any form
whatsoever is, reprehensible.
And the consequences of in-
tellectual dishonesty are felt by
the university, by one's fellow
students, and most important,
by the individual who is doing
the cheating.
For whengcheating becomes
a student pastime, the aca-
demic standing and atmos-
phere of the university is con-
siderably lowered, and conse-
quently, the value of its degree.
The other students are affected
in that their own efforts may
not be properly rewarded.
When so many course grades
are determined on a relative
basis, the effect of cheating is
to assign to honest work a
lower value by comparison.
For the individual, cheating
may begin an insidious pattern
which will develop beyond col-
lege days. Getting away with
something today encourages
trying the same kind of action
tomorrow.
What has, unfortunately, led
to a great deal of cheating
both here and at other schools
has been the willingness on the
part of some students to com-
promise that which cannot be
compromised, the individual's
moral integrity.
--Student Committee
on Honesty
John Eisberg, Chm.
Gretchen Burgie
Ann Doniger
Jo Hardee
Carol Holland
Martin Newman
William Ransom
Michael Sklar
Thomas Turner
Maurice Zilber

Council Sets
Dinner Date
'ith Group
Seeks Concurrment
With Relations Board
By THOMAS HAYDEN
City Council and the Ann Arbor
Human Relations Commission have
scheduled an informal dinner-dis-
cussion for March 15, aimed at
establisning a smoother working
relationship between the two
groups.
But most of the apparent diffi-
culties between the bodies have
been largely cleared up, Vaughn
Whited, Commission chairman,
said yesterday.
. At their Feb. 16 meeting, several
Commission members had sug-
gested the Council has been too
conservative in its attitude toward
human relations. The Council had
deliberately delayed action on two
of the Commission's discrimina-
tion reports, they indicated.
But after a meeting with several
city officials last Friday, Whited
said most of the troubles were due
to misunderstandings.
Recommended Action
The first of the Commission's
discrimination reports, made to
the Council in March, 1959,
studied housing conditions in the
city. It reported evidence for dis-
crimination, and recommended
Ann Arbor take some legislative
action.
"We were unaware of any Coun-
cil action on the report," Whited
said. "But a group headed by
Councilman (A. Nelson) Dingle
has had several meetings on the
matter." The Commission simply
hadn't been informed of the Din-
gle Committee's meetings, Whited
said.
The second report involves a
local store which the Commission
feels is guilty of discriminatory
practice. Neither the store's name
nor details of the case can be
published until the report is made
public, through the Council.
The report was sent to the
Council for addition to the Feb. 8
agenda, but was removed from the
agenda days before the meeting.
Report Incomplete
The Council explained that the
report was incomplete and that
analysis by the city attorney was
also necessary before official adop-
tion by the Council.
City Attorney Jacob Fahrner
said yesterday the Commission's
report seems to evidence no legal
difficulties.
The Council has now tentatively
planned to take up the report at
its regular meeting Monday night.

ODETTA'
FOLK MUSIC:
March 13 at 8:30
Detroit Institute of Arts
Auditorium
Tickets: $3.50, $2.75, $1.75
Available at
THE DISC SHOP

DANCE
f eaturing
The DIXIE-CATS
DICK CORRELL ARTIE EDWARDS
PHIL STANLEY JERRY LIBBY
KAY MIESEN TOM HYATT
BOB ALEXANDER HUGH SCOTT
FOR THE BEST BILL HENLINE BOB JAMES
MAC DANFORTH FREDDIE BENTZ
DANCE MUSIC, The CONTINENTALS
COOL OR HOT plus more fine talent
CALL HUGH SCOTT
NO0 5-5700
hugh scott agency
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March 5
Hill
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DIAL NO 8-6416

2ND OF THE CULTURAL
EXCHANGE FILMS WITH
RUSSIA

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The University's annual Mili-
tary Ball will be held 8-12 p.m.
March 4, in the Union Ballroom.
The theme of the formal dance
will be "This is My Country."
Decorations will honor the new
states, Alaska and Hawaii.
The ball is open to members of
the three branches of ROTC and
all members of the United States
and foreign armed forces.
Music will be provided by the
Fred Netting orchestra.
Bowling...
Alpha Kappa Lambda will have
a bowling party from 8 to 12 p.m.
tomorrow at the Ann Arbor Rec-
reation Hall. Dancing and refresh-
ments will follow the bowling par-
ty.- Music will be provided by
Marty Cantala and his Thirty-
three and a Third All Stars.
Platform . .
Hal Holbrook, who had been
scheduled to perform with the
Platform Attractions tomorrow,
will appear on April 12 instead.
Tickets already purchased for
tomorrow's show may be used at
the postponed performance.

TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
"THE GOLEM"
with
AIMOS
HARRY BAUR GERALD I NE AUSSEY
SHORT: "A TIME OUT OF WAR"
(Academy Award)
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
at 7:00 and 9.10
""GUNGA DINA"
with
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS Jr.
CARY GRANT VICTOR McLAGLEN
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

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