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February 23, 1960 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-23

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six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 23,1964

SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 22 1Q~fl

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v

Visconsin Defeats Michigan, 88-82, in

Overtime

(olverines Doomed to Big Ten Cellar
s Offense Falters in Extra Period

OLYMPIC GAMES:
U.S. Skater Leads, icers Win, 6-3

By DAVE LYON
Associate Sports Editor
Michigan's last hope for avoid-
ing the Big Ten basketball base-
mentvanished last night when
Wisconsin outlasted the Wolver-
ines, 88-82, in a loosely-played
overtime struggle.
The fast-breaking Badgers, in
winning their third straight Con-
ference game against eight losses,
saddled Michigan with its 11th
defeat in as many league contests.
Coach Bill Perigo's club can
manage a ninth-place tie, pro-
vided Wisconsin drops its last
three games and Michigan beats
Michigan State, Illinois and Iowa.
It seems improbable that this
combination of circumstances will
happen.
It has been a long time since
a Wisconsin cage team last won
three games in succession. And
never before had Michigan lost
as many as 11 Conference outings
in a row. The previous mark was
10, set 42 years ago.
This record-breaking defeat fol-
lowed the usual pattern of Michi-
gan losses this season. The early
lead (39-28 late in the first half)
was gradually overcome as Michi-
gan's thin forces tired from the
fast-breaking tactics of the op-
position.
When guard Marty Gharrity
canned a 25-footer with 4:10 left,
the Badgers assumed a 75-71 lead.
But somehow the home team
found enough energy to score four
points while holding their op-
ponents to none in the closing
minutes, and when Terry Miller
sank two free throws with 1:32
left, the game was sent into over-
time.
John Tidwell, who had scored
12 straight Michigan points previ-
New Record

ous to Miller's free shots, resumed
his scoring with a free throw to
open the five-minute overtime.
Then Michigan went into a 2%-
minute scoring lapse that proved
costly.
Wisconsin scoring balance paid
off well in the overtime, as five
playersshared the Badgers' 13
points in the extra session.
Two - point contributions from
Gharrity, Jack Ulwelling, and Bob
Barneson gave the Badgers an
81-76 edge. Miller then scored, but
Wisconsin's Frank Burks slipped
in for an easy layup at 1:36.
With little more than a minute
left, Jon Hall netted two free
throws. Then came the fatal blow.
Tidwell stole the ball in the
Wisconsin backcourt, but none of
the four hurried Michigan shots
that followed found the mark. Hall
missed two attempts, Tidwell and
Charlie Higgs one each.
Wisconsin finally got possession
and reserve Bob Powers put the
game out of reach with two free
tosses.
Many factors working in concert
contributed to Michigan's latest
defeat in a long series.
The loss of Lovell Farris on
MIacKay Wins
Tournament-
NEW YORK W) - Barry Mac-
Kay outblasted Dick Savitt, 6-2.
2-6, 10-12, 6-1, 6-4 yesterday and
won the National Indoor Tennis
Championship.
It was strictly a battle of big'
services and MacKay, a former.
Michigan great, held the edge,
especially in the last two sets
when Savitt, a part-time player
these days, appeared to wilt.
Thisdwas MacKay's second big
victory over Savitt in the last
eight days. A week ago Sunday,
he whipped Savitt in the final of
the Buffalo Indoor Tournament.
Each of these power hitters
smashed over ace after ace and
in the end, MacKay had 23 and
Savitt 28.
"Looking for a
Good Haircut"
* 11 1Haircutters
* No Waiting
Trf
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
near Michigan Theatre

fouls with 10:17 left in the game
seriously impaired Michigan's re-
bounding and scoring effective-
ness: In one of his finest games as
a collegian, Farris bucketed 28
points (the night's individual
high), pulled in 14 rebounds, and
authoritatively dominated play
under both boards.
With Farris gone, Michigan's at-
tack, centered around Tidwell,
was more easily defensed by the
visitors. Wisconsin came out run-
ning in the second half, and its
fast break, instituted this year by
new coach John Erickson, resulted
in easy layups and wore out the
Wolverines.
Michigan's shooting eye thus
lost its focus in the second half
while Wisconsin's improved from
a first-half .333 to a second-half
.595.
Farris and Tidwell accounted
for 31 of Michigan's first 39 points,
Farris converting a rebound with
two minutes left in the half to give
Michigan its largest lead, 39-28.
From there Wolverine fortunes
went more or less downhill.
Wisconsin seized its first lead
at 62-61, shortly after Farris fouled
out. The Cleveland senior received
a sustained ovation from the small
Yost Field House gathering of
2,000.
Tidwell's ensuing heroics pre-
vented another Michigan collapse,
and with some scoring support
f from teammates, Michigan could
have decided the issue in its favor
within regulation time.
COLLEGE SCORES
Big Ten
Northwestern 71, MSU 6
Indiana 92, Ilinois 78
Iowa 78, Purdue 68

SQUAW VALLEY, Calif. (R) -
Carol Heiss of Ozone Park, N.Y.,
virtually clinched the women's
figure skating championship and
the rugged U. S. ice hockey team.
smashed Sweden, 6-3, yesterday in
the eighth Winter Olympics.
Miss Heiss, 20-year-old New
York University student, complet-
ed the compulsory figure phase of
the figure skating competition
with a commanding lead over her
nearest rival, SioukJe Dijkstra of
Holland.
She is regarded as a cinch to
capture the crown with her free,
skating performance today.
A carpenter from Warroad,
Minn.,, Roger Christian, scored
three goals - hockey's "hat trick"
-as the American team kept pace

with the defending champion Rus-
sians. The Soviet team beat
Czechoslovakia 8-5 in its opening
game of the championship round
robin.
Meanwhile Russia and the com-
bined German team won gold
medals and France's Jean Vuarnet
scored a surprise upset in the
men's downhill yesterday in the
eighth Winter Olympic Games.
Vuarnet, a dark horse, raced
down the two-mile hill in break-
neck speed to capture the down-
hil trace in 2:06 seconds.
Georg Thoma, a stocky letter
carrier from Germany's Black For-
est, won the Nordic combined ski-
ing event by adding a brilliant 15-
kilometer cross-country race to'

U -

ENGINEERING NOTICE
The Martin Company representative will
visit the campus on March 1, 2, 3 to discuss
opportunities for graduates of the School of
Engineering.
Contact your Placement Officer for ap-
pointment and further details.
THE MARTIN COMPANY
BALTIMORE 3, MARYLAND
Missiles - Electronic Systems - Nuclear
Applications - Advanced Space Programs
Designers and Manufacturers

his excellent jumping perform-
ance Sunday. The Combined is
judged on both events.
Klara Guseva, a 22 year old
Russian school teacher, won the
women's 5,000-meter speed skat-
ing title.
Vuarnet's victory in the down-
hill came as a shock to skiing ex-
perts. Adrien Duvillard was re-
garded as France's best downhill
skier but Karl Schranz, the Aus-
I r i a n sensation, ,Roger Staub,
Swiss winner of Sunday's Giant
Slalom, were heavily favored.
Want Your Raincoat
Made Water-repellent
FREE?
During February
We will apply the famous
"crgvenette" process
to your plain raincoat
(no pile or quilted linings)
for the price of cleaning
and pressing only.
Gold Bond
Cleaners
515 E. William

I

WISCONSIN G
Hughbanks ..10
Clow ........ 4
Burks ....... 4
Barneson .... 1
Gharrity .....11
Ulwellingc ... 6
Young ...... 1
Powers ..... 0
Biggs ........ 0
TOTALS ...37
MICHIGAN G
Tidwell ......10
Farris.
Brown .. .... 3
M~iler .*,.....w
Hall ..... 2
Schoenherr .. 0
Meyer ,..,... 1
Riggs.........0
TOTALS ...32

F
3-4
0-0
1-9
2-2
4-6
1-1
0-0
2-2
1-1
14-19
F
7-10
6-4
0-0
2-2
3-4
0-0
0-0
0-1
18-25

P
5
3
3
4
2
1
0
0
0
18
P
2
5
3
3
1
0
1.
17

T
23
8
9
4
26
13
2
2
1
88
T
27
28
6
12
7
0
2-
82

Others
Georgia Tech 69. Fla. 55 (ovi.)
Vanderbilt 80, Georgia 75
Auburn 72, Tennessee 63
Western ich . 76, Loyola (11.) 64
Wake Forest 89, Villanava 70
Oklahoma 50, Nebraska 49
Kentucky 75, Alabama 55
Mlississippi St. 70, Tulane 66
Houston 63, Bradley 58
Cincinnati 85, North Texas State 54
I

--Daily-Dave Giltrow
ANOTHER REBOUND -- Michigan forward Lovell Farris (34)
grabs one of his 14 rebounds in action against Wisconsin last
night. Although Farris fouled out with 10 minutes to go in regu-
lation time he still led all scores with 28 points, 19 of them in the
first half. Wisconsin squelched Miehigan's hopes of escaping the
cellar with an 88-82 victory in overtime.

'I Eim®)

FHAOUL RAMATI
Israeli Consulate, Chicago
speaking on
"Patterns of Stress and Stability
in the Middle East"
4:15 Wed., Feb. 24
3rd floor Conference, Mich. Union

0

'1ilili AND DICK MASLOWSKI

I

F A -.- 'U k'

ENGINEERS ANl SCIENTISTh
REIPRESENTATIVES.OF
NORTH AME RICAN AVIATION,.INC.
!ILI7CONDUCT ON:CAMPTJ~ITERIAEWS FEBRUARY 25 & 26
-I Visit your placement office now,
for all the facts about a future with North American Aviation'.Inc.

C-

Nuclear
power
at the Atomics
International
Division
IConoga Park, Coiifornfa'

I

Atomics International, located in the San'
Fernando Valley of Southern California, is a
leader in the development and manufacture
of nuclear reactors for power, research, and
mobile systems. Two proven AI power reac-
tor concepts are now under construction.
Atomics International is building a Sodium

Electronics
& electro-
mechanics at the
Autonetics Divisior-
(Downey. Colfornol

Autonetics, a leader in the field of electronics,
is engaged in research, development, and
manufacture of Computers, Inertial Guid-
ance, Armament Control and Flight Control
Systems. Autonetics designed and built the
inertial navigation system for the USS Nau-
tilus and Skate; the first, completely auto-'

Graphite Reactor for the Consumers Public
'Power District of Nebraska and an Organic
Power Reactor at Piqua, Ohio. AI also is
engaged in extensive research activities to
develop improved materials for fuel ele-
gents and reactor components.'
'mattc Ianding system ±t supersonic missiles
and aircraft; the first, general purpose, all-
transistor, digital computer. It is now at work
on the inertial navigation system for the first
nuclear-powered Polaris-carrying subma-
rines and the guidance and control systems
for the Minuteman and GAM-77 missiles.-

They're transmission engineers with Michigan
Bell Telephone Company in Detroit. Burnell
graduated from Western Michigan in 1951
with a B.S. in Physics, spent four years in
the Navy, then joined the telephone company.
His present work is with carrier systems, as
they relate to Direct Distance Dialing facilities..
Dick got his B.S.E.E. degree from Michigan
in 1956 and came straight to Michigan Bell.
He is currently engineering and adrinistering
a program to utilize new, transistorized re-
peater (amplifier) equipment.
Both men are well qualified to answer a
question you might well be asking yourself:
"What's in telephone company engineering
for me?"
SAYS DICK:
"There's ,an interesting day's work for you
every day. You really have to use your engi-
neering training and you're always working
with new developments. Every time Bell Lab-
oratories designs a new and more efficient
piece of equipment, you are challenged to in-
corporate it in our system effectively and
economically. For example, I have been work-
ing on projects utilizing a newly developed
voice frequency amplifier. It's a plug-in type
-transistorized-and consumes only two
watts, so it has lots of advantages. But I have
to figure out where and how it can be used in
our sprawling network to provide new and
improved service. Technological developments
like this really put spice in the job."
SAYS BURNELL:
"Training helps, too-and you get the best.
Through an interdepartmental training pro-
gram, you learn how company-wide operations
dovetail. You also get a broad background by
rotation of assignments. I'm now working
with carrier systems, but previously worked on
repeater (amplifier) projects as Pick is doing
now. Most important, I think you always learn

$ 1

The Columbus Division, designed and built design studies now underway at the Colum-
, - the Navy's T2J Buckeye, America's most ver- bus Division include undersea, land, and air'
Naval satile jet trainer which will train today's weapons systems for all Military Services.A
aircraft jet cadets to command tomorrow's manned Current studies include ASW, missiles, ECM,
Smissiles at the weapons systems, and the Navy's supersonic, intercept aircraft, electronics systemsVTOL-
Columbus Division all-weather A3J Vigilante, today's most ver- STOL, ground support equipment, and other
Icalumbus io) s satile manned weapons system. Advanced still confidential programs.

NA a !Design &
developmert
of manned weapon
systems at the
Los Angeles Division
Ros Angeles, Colifornlol

The Los Angeles Division is the home of the
next-generation manned weapon system-
the Mach 3 B-70 Valkyrie multi-purpose
bomber-and America's first manned space
vehicle, the X-15. Engineers in this division
are engaged in research, development, any

II ~.-

'production of r'completeI manned weapon
systems. Work encompasses the fields of
Electronics, Metallurgy, Structures, Aero-
dynamics, Thermodynamics, Dynamics,
Mathematics, Physics, Human Factors and
Industrial Engineering.
missiles and space exploration vehicles of a
wide variety of range, speed and propulsion
methods. Scientists at the Aero-Space Labo-
ratories, an organization within the Missile
Division, are conducting creative research
well in advance of existing technology in the
space sciences.,

A & Missile
weapon
system management
& space research at
the Missile Division,
tDown Coifor' 1 ,

SThe Missile Division is the home of the GAM-
77 "Hound Dog," an air-to-surface missile
for the Air Force's B-52 bomber. The Mis-
sile Division has within its ranks some of the
nation's most experienced engineers and sci-
entists in the fields of missiles and weapon
,systems. They are performing research on

.,.
: , x

I

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