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December 12, 1963 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-12-12

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1963

PAGE EJORT THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. DECEMBER 12. 1963

AtlantanusVoice Objections over Evidence

(Continued from Page 2)

stairs to the second floor. As they
made their way to the back stair-
way, the policeman saw Oswald
standing beside a soft drink ma-
chine, sipping from a Coke bottle."
(Washington Post, Dec. 1.),
Criticism
According to the New York Post
(Nov. 27) two noted criminal law-
yers have questioned this account.
Maurice Edelbaum said: "The
main incongruity I see is the re-
port of Oswald's swift descent
from the sixth floor. The moment
a policeman rushed into the build-
ing Oswald was there."
Raymond Brown stated: "How
did he get down? Were there steps
or an elevator from the sixth
floor? Did anybody see him?"
Then, according to Wade, Os-
wald left the building and walked
four blocks west to Lamar St.
where he boarded a bus. He rode
the bus an undetermined number

of blocks and then got off. He
hailed a taxicab and rode four;
miles to his room in the Oak Cliff
section of Dallas.
14-Minute Trip
He arrived, according to Mrs.
Roberts, just 14 minutes after the
assassination. Now if the taxicab
were able to average 20 miles an
hour, which we think would be
maximum, the taxi ride would
have taken 12 minutes.
This leaves Oswald with just
I two minutes to shoot the Presi-
dent and Gov. Connally, clean and
hide the gun, run down four flights
of stairs, search his pockets for
coins, get a Coke from the ma-
chine, open it, engage in some
conversation with Truly and the
policeman, make his way from the
second floor out of the building,
walk four blocks to the bus stop,
board the bus and ride several
blocks, and get off the bus and hail
a taxi.
Amount of Traffic
On Dec. 1, however, the Wash-
ington Post quoted housekeeper
Roberts as saying: "He came dash-
ing in about 1 o'clock."
This new version creates new
difficulties, for these reporters re-
fer to "the floundering of the bus
:n the choked downtown traffic,"
and to the fact that Oswald "told
the (cab) driver to drop him off
at a corner five blocks from his
rooming house."
If the traffic was "choked" we
probably need to cut in half the
estimated averager speedof the
taxi over the four miles to Os-
wald's rooming house. At an aver-
age speed of 10 miles an hour, it
would have taken the taxi 24 min-
utes to cover the distance.
This would leave Oswald five
minutes to shoot the President and
Gov. Connally, clean and hide the
gun, run down four flights of

stairs; search his pockets for coins,
get a Coke from the machine, open
it, engage in some conversation
with Truly and the policeman,
make his way from the second
floor out of the building, walk four
blocks to the bus stop, board the
bus and ride several blocks, and
get off the bus and hail a taxi.
And, of course, if we accept this
version, we must allow, within the
five minutes left to Oswald, the
time necessary to walk the five
blocks back to his roming house
from the corner to which the taxi
took him.
Conclusion .. .
We are aware that under great
pressure and in the midst of con-
fusion, mistakes are easily made.
No doubt many of the discrep-
ancies presented above are of this
nature. If so, physical evidence
can be produced which will read-
ily make this clear.
It is also true, however, that un-
der great pressure and in the midst
of confusion investigating agencies
may be tempted to declare a case
closed and to presume an innocent
man guilty, especially when that
man is dead and cannot be
brought to trial.
Magazine Accounts
Since the bulk of this analysis
was written, the nation's leading
news magazines - Time, Life,
Newsweek and U.S. News and
World Report-have made public
their versions of the assassina-
tion. They merely add to the con-
fusion.
For example, Time (Dec. 6) has
Oswald buying rifle and sight for
$19.95, while according to News-
week (Dec. 9) he paid $12.78.
All early accounts of the assas-
sination put the speed of the Pres-
ident's limousine at about 25 miles
per hour, but now it has slowed to

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15 miles per hour (Life, Nov. 29),
"no more than half the 25 miles
per hour first estimated by author-
ities" (Newsweek, Dec. 9), and 12
miles per hour (U.S. News and
World Report, Dec. 9).
The latter magazine comments:
"If President Kennedy's car had
been moving even 20 miles an
hour, the experts say, it might
have made the lead time too dif-
ficult a problem for the sniper."
Could this be why the car has
slowed down since Nov. 22?
Crucial Point Unsolved
The central problem-the fact
that the President was wounded in
the front of the throat ("the mid-
section of the front part of his
neck," according to "staff doctors"
at Parkland Hospital on Nov. 23
(New York Times, Nov. 24)-re-
mains.
Life and Newsweek place the
President's car 170 feet and 150
feet past the turn at the time of
the first shot: a shorter distance
than our estimate, but much too
distant from the window for a
shot through the front of the
neck.
Life (Dec. 6) recognizes the
problem, but solves it by saying
that the President was turning far
to the right at the moment of im-
pact.
Invalid
This explanation appears to fail
for two reasons. First, Life's own
pictures of the event in the issue
of Nov. 29 show the President
looking straight ahead.
Second, Elm St. curves left as
it passes the warehous building
(see the picture on page 32H of
Life, Nov. 29), in such a way that
when the first bullet struck, the
President's back was to the win-
dow.
In order for a bullet to have
entered "the mid-section of the
front part of his neck" the Presi-
dent would have had to turn com-
pletely around just before the shot
was fired.
Purpose of Investigation
We believe there must be an in-
vestigation of the assassination
which does not set out to prove
that Oswald did it, but which
works on the assumption that the
identity of the killer or killers is
unknown.
It is disturbing that the pur-
pose of investigating bodies set
up by the state of Texas and by
the new President has been de-
scribed as the refutation of rumors
that there was a conspiracy and
the dispelling of all doubt that
Oswald was the assassin.
If and when an objective in-
vestigation is conducted, we would
not be surprised to find that Os-
wald was actually a minor figure
in the affair, if he was involved at
all.
Five Questions
More than this. We believe that
the agencies which have thus far
conducted the investigation should
themselves be asked some ques-
tions. Among these are:
1) How was Jack Ruby per-
mitted to shoot Lee Oswald?
2) Did the FBI interview Oswald
a few days before the assassina-
tion?
3) What is the reason Dallas
police chief Curry, riding 40 feet
in front of the President's limou-
sine, was able (in his own words)
to "tell from the sound of the
three shots that they had come
from the book company's build-
ing?" (New York Times, Nov. 24).
4) Did the FBI show Oswald's
mother a picture of Ruby the
night before Ruby killed Oswald?
5) Is it true as reported in the
Washington Post, Dec. 1 (see also
the New York Herald Tribune,
Nov. 28), that "the FBI seized an
amateur photographer's movie
film showing silhouettes of two
men in the sniper window?"
Skepticism Necessary
It seems hardly too much to
suggest that the Dallas police and
the FBI need to acount for their
own activities before, during and
after the assassination.

Until such an accounting is
made, no version of the tragedy
produced by the police or the FBI.
can be accepted with confidence.

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ROW OF CHAIRS-A vast amount of equip-
ment is packed into the large open room which
serves as the dental school clinic. Hygienists in
training treat patients in these chairs.

Crowded Quarters

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CLINIC-Each dental student is assigned to a treatment cubicle for his period of
practical training. The clinic appears maze-like from above. There are presently a
total of 508 students enrolled in the dental school and no more room to expand
within the available facilities.

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ENGLISH LEATHER
cologne gives him an
air of dashing masculinity
whatever he's wearing.
It's a gift he'll
appreciate after shave,
after shower. . . and
after hours. In attractive
single bottles, or a
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$2 to 6.50

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YOUNGSTERS RECEIVE TREATMENT-Children, students and other University personnel can
obtain dental treatment at the school. These youngsters scamper across the lobby after having seen
one of the many student dentists. Practical training, however, is only one part of professional edu-
cation. Students work in the classroom and laboratory as well as in the clinic.

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OPEN WIDE-Hygienists and dentists work under special super-
vision in the clinic which provides students with the necessary
practical experience which cannot be gained in classes or labora-
tories. Equipment of every sort is available to the student.

MUSCLE POTENTIAL-In the laboratory dental students meas-
ure the action potential from muscles-or their electromyography
with complex instruments. The dental school needs more space
for research like this.

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