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December 11, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-12-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1963

)swaid
DITOR'S NOTE: The fol-
ng are excerpts from an
ysis of the published evi-
e against Lee Harvey Os-
lthe accused slayer of
ident John F. Kennedy.
'rof. Staughton Lynd of
man College and Jack Man-
of Atlanta compiled this
ment, showing some of the
nsistencies in the evidence
far presented, from dis-
hes appearing in major
spapers and from interviews
reporters covering the as-
nation.

Case:

Holes

"
in

the

Evidence

UNIVERSITY CHOIR &r ORCHESTRA
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CONCERT
PROF. MAYNARD KLEIN conducting

GABRIELI:

"Anbgels Ad Pastores"

(Prof. Lynd obtained his doc-
torate in history at Columbia
University. Mannis is a former
graduate of Tulane University
where he studied political
science.
(Prof. Lynd explains that he
wished to raise some questions
that the defense attorney might
have if Oswald had ever been
tried. He says that if the evi-
dence has inconsistencies, they
ought to be confronted. Prof.
Lynd indicated that he had no
alternative theory to explain
what happened in case the Os-
wald theory is, in fact, wrong.
(This report has been sent to
Chief Justice Earl Warren and
the four Congressional mem-
bers of his investigatory mission.
It also has been given to the
Justice Department.)
On Dec. 3, newspapers reported
that the Federal Bureau of In-
vestigation would confirm in all
essentials the version of the Pres-
ident's assassination previously
presented by the Dallas police and
by Gordon Shanklin, FBI agent
in charge in Dallas.
According to these accounts the
FBI will state that: 1) Lee Oswald
without accomplices, fired three
shots at President Kennedy from a
sixth floor window of the Texas
Schoolbook Depository Building;
2) About five and one half seconds
elapsed between the first shot and
the last; 3) All three shuts came
from behind and slightly to the
right of the President's car; 4)
The same weapon fired all three
shots.
These reports astonished us.
Like many citizens we have at-
Spratt To Discuss
Embryo Studies
Prof. Nelson T. Spratt of the
University of Minnesota will speak
on "Principles of Development Il-
lustrated by Studies of the..Early
Chick Embryo" in Rm. 1400
Chemistry Bldg.

the emergency room of the Park-
land Memorial Hospital in Dallas
immediately after the shooting,
described the President's wounds
thus:
"Mr. Kennedy was hit by a bul-
let in the throat, just below the
Adam's apple ... This wound had
the appearance of a bullet's en-
try. Mr. Kennedy also had a mas-
sive, gaping wound in the back
and on the right side of the head."
Dr. Perry was the first physi-
cian to treat the President. Dr.
Clark was summoned and arrived
in a minute or two.
Dilemma
The early news accounts re-
flected some confusion about the
nature of the President's wounds.
We saw nowhere in the newspa-
pers nor heard in any of the radio
or TV accounts any attempt to
reconcile a wound in the front of
the President's throat with the
theory that the shots came from
the Texas Schoolbook Depository,
75-100 yards to the rear of tre
President at the time the first shot
was fired
Nor did we see or hear any sug-
gestion that the original accounts
of where the President's car was
at the time of the shooting might
be inaccurate.
This could, perhaps, be attrib-
uted to the fact that identifica-
tion of the throat wound as one
of entry was tentative, and that it
would be reasonable to suppose a
bullet entering the back of the
President's head, fired from an
angle of about 45 degrees above
him, might exit at the Adam's ap-
ple.
The examining doctors, as they
were quoted in the early press ac-
counts, seemed to be unsure as to
whether one bullet or two had in-
flicted the head and throat wounds
of the President.

However, John Herbers, in a fol-
low-up story in the Times of Nov.
27, cleared all this up.
Herbers quotes Dr. Kemp Clark,
the Dallas surgeon who pronounc-
ed the President dead, as saying
that two bullets hit the President.
One entered through the throat
just below the Adam's apple and
ranged downward, without exiting.
The other struck the right side of
the back of the President's head
tangentially.
Reconciliations
From this description of the
President's wounds, it seems clear
that one bullet must have been
fired from in front of the Presi-
dent.
Herbers tries to reconcile the
frontal wound with the supposed
position of the assassin in the
Schoolbook Depository Building by
suggesting that the gunman could
have fired as the President's car
was approaching the building,
then swung the gun through an
arc of almost 180 degrees and fir-
ed twice more.
This reconcilation ignores the
uncontroverted accounts of many
eye-witnesses as to where the
President's car was at the time the
first shot was heard.
Well-Established
We think it well-established that
the first shot was fired only after
the President's car was more than
75 yards past the building. Indeed,
Herbers' own interpretation of the
15-second movie sequence estab-
lishes this almost beyond question.
In order for the assassin to have
wounded the President frontally
from his supposed position in the
building, he would have had to
fire while the presidential car was
entering the turn at Houston and
Elm, or before the car had halfway
completed the turn.
See CONFLICTING, Page 3

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-Daily-Kenneth Winter
FATEFUL ROUTE-Above is a chart showing the route of the late President's motorcade. It pro-
ceeded north on Houston St., then swung sharply to the left onto an approach to an underpass
leading to a Dallas expressway. It is 220 yards between the turn at Elm and Houston Streets to the
underpass; Prof. Lynd and Mannis estimate that the first shot was fired when Kennedy's limousine
was heading southwest about 100 yards past the turn.

tempted to follow the details of
the tragic events of Nov. 22 as
they have , been released to the
public. We have made what seems
to us a careful analysis of the
evidence.
We have shown this analysis to
a number of research specialists,
college professors and newsmen,
including one reporter who cover-
ed the story for a leading Ameri-
can newspaper.
Without exception, these read-
ers felt that our analysis merited
serious consideration, and that it
called into question several as-
pects of the FBI-Dallas police ac-
count of the assassination.
Four Questions. .
We believe there are important
contradictions between the receiv-
ed version of the crime and the
available evidence, which other
citizens may want to consider.
We think the American people
have a right to know:
1) How Lee Oswald, from a posi-
tion behind and slightly to the
right of President Kennedy, fired
a shot which entered the Presi-
dent's neck just below the Adam's
apple;
2) How Oswald, using a bolt-
action rifle, fired three shots withI

Ticket refunds for 13
O .
By mail to: IN PERSON AT:
Gilbert & Sullivan Soc. Lobby Box Office
Student Activities Bldg. Student Activities Bldg.
Ann Arbor 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
self-addressed envelope Thursday, 12 ONLY
ALL REQUESTS FOR REFUNDS
MUST BE RECEIVED BY DEC. 13.
Cancelled performances will NOT be rescheduled
S -:-

deadly accuracy in five and one(
half seconds at a target 75-100t
yards away moving about 25 milesi
an hour;1
3) How the three shots could
have produced four bullets;
4) How Lee Oswald did all the
things he is supposed to have done
in the 15 or 30 minutes (there are
two different accounts) between,
the time the President was assas-
sinated and the time Oswald al-
legedly ran into his apartment
four miles away.
Location of Car...
At about 1230 p.m. Nov. 22,:the
President's limousine made the
turn at Elm and Houston Streets
into the approach to the under-
pass leading to Stemmons Free-
way. The car was traveling about
25 miles an hour, or about 12
yards per second.
The distance between the turn
at Elm Street and the underpass
is about 22 yards. Thus at the
speed at which all witnesses agree
the motorcade was traveling, the
maximum time it could have con-
sumed traversing this distance
would have been 20 seconds.
It is difficult to determine, with
precision, the exact point in the
traversal of the 220 yards at which
the shooting occurred. However,
some definite limits can be set
from the available evidence.
Estimates
Experienced newsmen, reporting
in the New York Times, the New
York Herald Tribune, the Wash-
ington Post, the Atlanta Constitu-
tion and for both Associated Press
and United Press International,
estimate that the President's car
was 75-100 yards past the turn
at Elm and Houston when the first
shot was fired.
Others, persons on the spot at
the time, say the President's car
was midway between the turn and
the underpass; Mrs. Connally says
the car was almost ready to go
underneath the underpass; Gov.
Connally says the car had just
made the turn at Elm and Hous-
ton.
John Herbers, writing in the
New York Times of Nov. 27, com-
ments on the 15-second movie se-
quence of the assassination taken
by an amateur photographer (from
which the pictures in Life maga-
zine were selected).
Five-Second Interval
He says five seconds elapsed
from the first shot until the Presi-
dent's car disappeared into the
underpass. If the President's car
continued at 25 miles an hour
after the first shot then it trav-
eled about 60 yards during this
five seconds and, therefore, must
have been about 160 yards from
the turn at Elm and Houston when
firing commenced.
If, as most witnesses believe, it
accelerated rapidly after the first
shot, then it traversed consider-
ably more than 60 yards during
those five seconds.
On the evidence of the movie,
we would estimate the distance
between the turn at Elm and
Houston and the site of the first
shot at something less than 160
yards, not appreciably out of line
with the estimates of witnesses
and newsmen, ad the anticipated
conclusion of the FBI report.
I Having established, with some

certainty we think, the fact that
the presidential car was approxi-
mately 100 yards past the turn at
Elm and Houston when the first
shot was fired, we can move to a
consideration of the wounds.
Wound Contradiction. .
Tom Wicker, in the New York
Times of Nov. 23, wrote that Doc-
tors Malcolm Perry and Kemp
Clark, who attended Kennedy in

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wu w~aaj'..r m r aw srw w -. .m. .m

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THEME OF SHOCKING REALISM

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
":~.::"1~"' :"r':1" .: "M" fM4 " .r.. tr.' ~.1"t " Jf"11.'A:::Vlr:rM' . :'. :T,,Y :V":V r.:e. 6V "M1.V::.SV"T

MEIRO-6OLBWYN-MAYER
A PERIABER6SEATON PRODUCTION,
RICHARD ClAMBIEIN

gee

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial t
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11 1
Day Calendar
Short Course for Assessing Officers--
Rackham Bldg., 9 a.m.
Dept. of Anatomy Seminar-Edith A.
Maynard, Assistant Prof., Dept. of
Anatomy, "Multiple Cholinesterases in
the Crustacean Nervous System": 2501
E. Medical Bldg., 1:10 p.m.
Dept. of Zoology Seminar-Nelson T.
Spratt, Chairman, Dept. of Zoology,
Univ. of Minn., "Principles of Develop-
ment Illustrated by Studies of theEarly
Chick Embryo": 1400 Chemistry Bldg.,
4 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program-Assoc.
of Producing Artists in Gorky's "The
Lower Depths": Trueblood Aud., 8:30
p.m. (Replacing cancellation of Nov.
22.)
Faculty-Doctoral Student Seminar:
In 229 W. Engrg. at 3:30 p.m. Speaker:
Dr. Alan S. Galbraith, Dir. of Mathe-
matical Division of the Army Research7
Office. Topic: "Program of Army Re-
search Office."
Recital by Piano Majors: Piano ma-
jors in the School of Music, Dennis
Sweigert, Christine Paraschos, and Bar-
bara Nissman, will present a recital this
afternoon, 4:15 p.m., in Lane Hall Aud.
No admission.
Botanical Seminar-Donald T. Kowal-
ski, U-M, will speak on "Development'
and Cytology of Didymocrea Sadasa-
vanii and Preussia Typharum" at 4:15
p.m. in 1139 Natural Science Bldg.
General Notices
Attention December Grads: College of
Lit., Science, and the Arts, School of
Education, School of Music, School of
Public Health, and School of Business
Admin.:
Students are advised not to request
grades of I or X in Dec. When such
grades are absolutely imperative, the
work must be made up in time to allow
your instructor to report the make-up
grade not later than 8:30 a.m., Mon.,
Dec. 30, 1963. Grades received after
that time may defer the student's
graduation until a later date.
Newcomer's Reception for faculty and
staff, originally scheduled for Sun., Nov.
24, will be held Sun., Dec. 15, from 4
to 6 p.m. at the President's House, 815
S. University.
A Valid Identification Card will be
required for the spring registration, Jan.
13-15. Those students who have
lost their cards may secure a replace-
ment by making application at Win-
dow A of the Office of Registration &
Records prior to Jan. 3. Students who
require a new card because of marriage,
may have their cards changed at the
Diploma Office, Room 555, prior to Jan.
3.
Freshman Hopwood Contest: All man-
uscripts must be in the Hopwood Room,
1006 Angell Hall, by 4 p.m. Wed., Dec.
11.
The Student Automobile Regulations
will be lifted on the last day of classes
this semester, Thurs., Dec. 12. The reg-
ulations will be resumed again the first
day of classes of the second semester, 8
a.m., Jan. 16, 1964.

Navy College Aptitude Test: Candi-
dates taking the Navy College Aptitude
Test on Dec. 14 are requested to report
to Room 130 Business Admin. Bldg. at
8:15 Sat. morning.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
U.S. Coast Guard-If you graduate in
Dec., you may apply for a commission
as a Reserve Officer. The next Officer
Candidate Sch. class starts Feb. 9, 1964.
17-wk. trng. prog. at Yorktown, Va. Cur-
riculum covers courses in leadership,
navigation, seamanship, communica-
tions, ordnance & gunnery, damage
control, etc. As an Officer Candidate
you will be able to specify the kind of
duty & location you desire upon grad-
uation.
Announcing 1964 Summer Session in
Japan at Sophia Univ. in Tokyo. The
following courses avail.: Contemporary
Japan, Art Hist. of Japan, Comparative
Religion, Modern Hist. of Far East,
Comparative Govt., Japanese Language,
Japanese Literature in Translation. For
further information come to Bureau
of Appointments, General Div., 3200
SAB.
POSITION OPENINGS:
U.S. Civil Service-1) Engrg. Aide-2
yrs, college with mapor study in draft-
ing, math, tech., phys. sci., or engrg.
2) Soil Conservation Aide-2 yrs. col-
lege in agriculture or civil engrg. 3)
Soil Conservationist-BS Soil Conserva-
tion or related agri. science (including
forestry) or civil engrg. 3) Soil Scientist
-BS in Soil Science or closely related
field.
Conn. Civil Service-Clerk III - BA
degree or combination of college &
office work totaling 4 yrs. Has responsi-
ble charge of the clerical or record
keeping functions of a State dept. of
a large unit within a dept. Apply by
Dec. 18 for the exam on Jan. 18.
Scott Paper Co., Philadelphia, Pa.-
Opening for Editorial Assistant-Oppor.
for "entry" level position on the edi-
torial staff in the Publications Dept.
of an integrated Public Rels. Div. Re-
sponsibilities include assisting in the
organization & publication of a com-
pany newspaper & a corporate maga-
zine. Recent grad or immediate de-
gree seeker with 0-3 yrs. exper. Must
have proven record of writing skills
including both news feature stories &
knowledge of layout procedures.
Library of Congress-Various openings
including: Supv., Editorial Unit of Aero-
space Info. Div.,; Music Reference Li-
brarian & Cataloger for Div. for the
Blind; Head, Fiscal Control Sect. for
Copyright Office; Processing Librarian
for Descriptive Cataloging Div.; Ass't.
Head, Hispanic Exchange Sect. of Ex-
change & Gift Div.; Reference Librar-

SHOWS START of 1:00
2:50-4:55-7:00 & 9:05
FEATURE STARTS 10
Minutes Later

ian-Records & Briefs for Law Library;
Scientific Analyst (Phys. Set.); Head,
Trng. Sect, of Personnel Office; Bib-
liographer & Set. Librarian for Set. &
Tech. Div.; Subj. Cataloger for Subj.
Cataloging Div.
«* m
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
TEACHER PLACEMENT EXAMS:
The National Teacher Exams will be
held on Sat., Feb. 15, 1964, in Ann Ar-
bor. Bulletins of Information contain-
ing registration forms and detailed in-
formation about the Feb. 15 exams may
be obtained from: National Teacher
Exams, Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, N.J. Registration for the tests
must be filed before Jan. 17, 1964. Chi-
cago (Elementary) and San Francisco
are twoof the many places requiring
this exam,
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
663-1511, Ext. 3547.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
University Lutheran Chapel, Midweek
Vespers with Holy Communion, "The
Kingdom Which Has Come," Vicar John
Koenig, Dec. 11, 10 p.m., 1511 Washte-
naw.

NICK ADAMS CLAUDE RAINS' JOAN BL.ACKMAN
and iiua
JAMES GREGORY A into Ting
wihPA nMJOYHAHRO

Good seats still available for tonight's opening of
OKLAHOMA?
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8:00 p.m.

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