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December 10, 1963 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-12-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10 ,:;

TflE MICilIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10.

,.x,

Question Research Developmenta
(Cot-ue ro Pae1

Carlson Analyzes 'Hate Clan'

Carlson claimed the cause of
this revolution is man himself.
"The world is being re-made by
PTP To Perform
'Phoenix,' ,Scapin'
The Professional Theatre Pro-
gram will present the Association
of Producing Artists in Fry's "A
Phoenix Too Frequent" and Mo-
liere's "Scapin" tonight at 8:30
p.m. in Trueblood Aud.

JOHN ROY CARLSON
... why hate?
man. But he is making a mess of
things," he asserted.
Carlson said that George Lin-
coln Rockwell, leader of the Amer-
ican Nazi Party, Rev. Bill Hargis,
a southern minister, and Robert
Welsh, head of the John Birch
Society, are representative of the
hate fronts in the United States.
Sick Men
"We cannot learn from a Rock-
well or a Communist," he com-
mented. "These are sick men."
Continuing, Carlson claimed
that the John Birch Society is

not a mass movement, but it gives
ill guidance to other groups com-
prising 15-16,000 people.
This country "was not founded
by cowards but these men seek to
make cowards out of the United
States," Carlson said. "Why instill
fear or dissention?"
Hate Groups
Carlson called the National As-
sociation for the Advancement of
White People a "hate group" par-
alled by the Black Muslims, led
by Mohammed Elijah. The latter is
an example of Negro racism, Carl-
son said. "Mohammed wants to
be dictator of a Negro south," he
noted.
To solve the problem Carlson
said the government might set
aside half a billion dollars to cure
the psychotics and mentally ill. He
noted that among these 10 million
are people like Lee H. Oswald, the
late accused assassin of President
John F. Kennedy.
He said that people must learn
to recognize all political extremes
are evil. "Only the 'golden middle'
is the democratic way," he con-
cluded.
Have Faith
Carlson outlined three ways peo-
ple can change the hate situation
from around the world:
1) Study the extreme groups,
analyze them, and question them.
2) Do not let hate get away but
"bring social action against hate"
such as the Pope John resolution.
3) Have faith in democracy and
in "good rather than evil."
He emphasized faith, but not
blind faith, is the most important
one of these. Carlson commented
that this faith in democracy
should suppress the feeling of
hate.
Group To Present
Christmas Music
The Sestette Italiano Lucia Mer-
enzio will perform madrigals and
Christmas music as the fourth
performance in the University Mu-
sical Society's Chamber Arts Series
tonight at 8:30 p.m. in Hill Aud.

He commented that "a lot of
the needed extra scientists willt
have to come from graduate
schools other than the University's
since the growth of the University
graduate school in recent years
has been held constant at five per
cent per year due to limitation
of funds."
Other questions posed by the4
committee were:
1) Should the federal govern-
ment support research in the so-3
cial sciences and humanities at
a level equal to its support of
research in the physical and math--
ematical sciences?
Affect Teaching Quality ,
2) Are federal research and de-

Exam Schedule

The following examination
schedule is for all University
departments and schools with
the exception of the Law and
Medical Schools.
The examination code letter
corresponds to the time of the
first lecture for courses having
both lecture and recitation per-
iods, or the first recitation
period of the week. Certain
courses have special periods, in-
dicated below. Classes begin-
ning on the half hour will be
scheduled at the preceding
hour.
MONDAY
Time Examination Code
8 .......A Mon., Dec. 16, 8-10
9 ...... B Tues., Dec. 17, 8-10
10 ...... C Wed., Dec. 18, 8-10
11 .... .D Thurs., Dec. 19, 8-10
12 ...... Q Mon., Dec. 16, 4-6
1 ...... E Fri., Dec. 20, 8-10
2 ...... F Sat., Dec. 21, 8-10
3 .......G Tues., Dec. 17, 4-6
4 ...... R Wed., Dec. 18, 4-61
TUESDAY
8 ......H Thurs., Dec. 19, 4-61
9 .........I Fri., Dec. 20, 4-6
10 .........J Sat., Dec. 21, 4-6
11 K Mon., Dec. 16, 10:30-12:30
12 .. S Fri., Dec. 20, 10:30-12:301
1 M Thur., Dec. 19, 10:30-12:301

2 'N Sat., Dec. 21, 10 :30-12:30
3 P Tues., Dec. 17, 10:30-12:30
4 T Wed., Dec. 18, 10:30-12:30
SPECIAL PERIODS
Business Admin. School:
Course Code
Accounting 271. 500 . ... W, Y
Bus. Ad. 305, 505Q......Q, S
Bus. Ad. 450...........RU
Ind. Rel. 300, 500........R, T
Mktg. 300, 301, 500X......V X
Engineering College:
Eng. Graphics 101 ...... U, V
Eng. Graphics 102, 104 . . Q, W
Literary College:
Chem. 103, 104, 195, 222,
468, 469 .............. R, Y
Econ. 101, 102, 103, 104, 401 S, X
Econ. 271 .............. W, Y
Eng. 123, 124 ......... .. L
French 101, 102, 111, 112,
221, 222, 231, 232, 361,
362 .................. P, U
German 101, 102, 111, 231,
232, 236 .............. T, V
Italian 101.............. T, V
Latin 103, 221, 222 ...... P, U
Math. 115, 215 .......... K, W
Physics 153. ...........0, S
Russian 101, 102, 111, 201,
301, 351, 401 .......... P, U
Spanish 101, 102, 1-03, 221,
222, 231, 232 .......... T, V

He concluded that long-rangej
planning and general allocation of
resources were becoming "an ab-
solute necessity."
Not Merely Massive
He cautioned against regarding
mere massiveness in research as
equivalent to scientific creativity

velopment policies and program 'and progress.
management adversely affecting The major advances, Haskins
the teaching quality and avail- said, "must inevitably rest . . in
ability of teachers at all levels the hands of a comparatively few
from grades to the universities? highly original and gifted men and
Haskins, in his annual report, women-a miniscule proportion of
asked questions not unlike those the entire scientific population."
raised by the congressmen. He al-
so had no specific answers but
told his fellow scientists that "cre- H onorary
ative genius cannot be confined,
else creation can be extinguish- ni a e*2
ed . "Initiatles

The local chapter of Beta Gam-
ma Sigma, national business ad-
ministration honorary, recently
initiated 28 new members.
Chosen were:
Leon Angelo, Clifton A. Cobb, Rich-
ard J. Cowles, Alan J. Dybvig, Royce
G. Engel, Peter W. Froyd, Charles H.
Gessner, Alien S. Gray. David O. Har-
bert, Frederick A. Herbert, Michael P.
Messner, Duncan Neuhauser, John G.
Rodwan, Donald C. Ruschman, Tadd
C. Seitz, Ronald A. Sistrunk, Richard
Staelin. Thomas W. Sumner, Horst
Sylvester, Douglas E. VanScoy, Thomas
M. West, Morley A. Winograd and
William H. Yag.
SFaculty members selected were Dean
Floyd A. Bond and Professors Charles
N. Davisson, Carl H. Fischer, Paul W.
McCracken and J. Philip Wernette.
Steering Group
Elects Mehier
Edward A. Mehler, '65, was
elected chairman of the literary
college steering committee yester-
day, succeeding David Passman,
'64.
Petitioning for membership next
year on the steering committee
will open Jan. 16. Petitions, avail-
able in University housing units,
must be returned by Jan. 27. Mem-
bership is open to all literary col-
lege students.
Quadrants Tap
Fall Initiates

Colege
Roundup
By STEVEN ZARIT
COLUMBUS-The Ohio Senate
passed a bill last week which
would give Ohio State University
$8 million more than the appro-
priation requested by university
officials for the next fiscal year.
The Ohio House is expected to
approve a similar bill. Most of
the additional funds will be used
for the further development of
university branches in Dayton,
Lima and Mansfield,
* * *
NEW HAVEN-Yale University's
34 fallout shelters are now being
stocked with a two week supply
of food and water to accommo-
date 22,000 people. Yale faculty
members and students are being
trained for the task of managing
the shelters in the event that
they must be used.
ALBUQUERQUE-The adminis-
tration of the University of New
Mexico agreed to review the deci-
sion of the Interfraternlty Coun-
cil to deny the creditation of an
integrated fraternity to the cam-
pus.
* * *
MADISON-The University of
Wisconsin announced last week
that it will initiate an exchange
of students and faculty with Ne-
gro schools in the South, possibly
beginning next September. A sec-
ond part of the university's equal
opportunity program, encouraging
deprived high school students to
carry on their education on the
university level, will be set into
operation immediately.
I ' 1

DIAL2-6264
ENDING TODAY
Shows ot 1.:00-3:30-6:05 & 8:45
OEEAUEEY
WEDNESDAY 7

loopqmmmrmwmm

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I

Ticket refunds for
t TEMKALG t
By mail to: IN PERSON AT:
Gilbert & Sullivan Soc. Lobby Box Office
Student Activities Bldg. Student Activities Bldg. -
Ann Arbor 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
SEnclose tickets, stamped
self-addressed envelope Thursday, Dec. 12 ONLY
ALL REQUESTS FOR REFUNDS
MUST BE RECEIVED BY DEC. 13
Cancelled performances will NOT be rescheduled
co<2tSc <:2"> <"">a<""""":>c.""><"""""o<c""oo<"""""

Gilbert & Sullivan Society
Invites applications
for the position of
Dramatics Director.
If interested call:
Mary Ellen Mason, 662-5718

M-64MpfE5Q6 *
A PERLBERGSEAI'ON PROOOiGlT1 04~r
RICHAD
CHAMBERLAN
co-starrng
NICK( ADAMS' C[ALOE RAINS
JOAN BLAKMAN
JAMES ORGW A BUTIRAM
I,.JOEY HEAIIIERION

The South Quadrangle Quad-
rants Honorary this fall tapped
the following students:
Darryl J. Anderson, '66; Charles P.
Case, '66E; Richard L. Dombos, '66;
John W. English, '66; Stephen C.
Hershey, '65; John J. Lynch, '64, and
Leonard M. Schwartz, '66. William Hopp
was selected for recognition as an hon-
orary member.

m

WHAT IS THE PERFECT XMAS GIFT?
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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.,.;:"::.":.}.}",}::R":v:. v . 1....:-.... ....... ..

It-

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE, 8 P.M.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10
Day Calendar
Short Course for Assessing Officers-
Rackham Bldg., 9 a.m.
School of Music Recital-DMA Piano
Series, "Liszt: Transcendental Etudes,"
Doctoral Students in Piano Perform-
ance: Aud. A, Angell Hall, 4:15 p.m.
Professional Theater Program-Associ-
ation of Producing Artists in Fry's "A
Phoenix Too Frequent" and Moliere's
"Scapin": Trueblood Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Univ. Musical Society Chamber Arts
Series-Sestetto Italiano Luca Marenzio,
Madrigals and Christmas Music: Rack-
ham Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Botany Seminar-Dr. William Lacey,
Univ. College of North Wales, Bangor,
will speak on "Lower Carboniferous
Planets from North Wales." In 1139
Natural Science Bldg. at 4:15 p.m.
General Notices
The student automobile regulations
will be lifted on the last day of classes
this sem., Thurs., Dec. 12. The regula-
tions will be resumed again the first
day of classes of the second sem., 8
a.m. Jan. 16, 1964.
There will be no official meetings of
Nursing 100 this sem.
All teacher's certificate candidates-
Everyone receiving a teacher's certifi-
cate must secure a health statement
in the junior and senior years. This
service will be free during the Jan.
orientation and registration period only.
There will be a charge at all other
times. Plan to attend the Health Ser-
vice between Jan. 13-18. Further in-
formation can be obtained in Room
1203 Univ. High School.
Newcomer's Reception for faculty and
staff, originally scheduled for Sun., Nov.
24, will be held Sun., Dec. 15, from 4
Sto 6 p.m. at the President's House, 815
S. University,
A Valid Identification Card will be
required for the spring registration, Jan.
13-15 and 18. Those students who have
lost their cards may secure a replace-
ment by making application at Win-
dow A of the Office of Registration &
Records prior to Jan. 3. Students who
require a new card because of marriage,
may have their cards changed at the
Diploma Office, Room 555, prior to Jan.
3.
Freshman Hopwood Contest: All man-
uscripts must be in the Hopwood Room,
1006 Angell Hall, by 4 p.m. Wed., Dec.
11.
Recommendation for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wishing
to recommend tentative Dec. graduates
from the College of L.S. & A, for hon-
ors or high honors should recommend
such students by forwarding a letter
(in 2 copies one copy for Honors
Council, one copy for the Office of Reg-
istration and Records) to the Director,
)yami

Honors Council, 1210 Angell Hail, by
3 p.m., Fr., Dec. 27.
Teaching departments in the School
of Education should forward lettersadi-
rectly to the Office of Registration and
Records, Room 1513, Admin. lBdg., by
8:30 a.m., Mon., Dec. 30.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The Brooklyn Union Gas Co., Brook-
lyn, N.Y.-Will you be in New York over
the holidays? If so, why not stop in at
the Brooklyn Union Gas Co for a career
placement interview. Interested stu-
dents may make an appointment by
calling-in New York-643-3734. For fur-
ther information and a copy of our
booklet "Launch Your Career" see
your Placement Office.
Attention December Grads-All Dec.
graduates registered with the Bureau
of Appointments, both General & Edu-
cational Divisions, are requested to no-
tify the Bureau as to whether or not
you have accepted a position in order
that your records may be kept up to
date. If you are still available, let us
know where you can be reached after
Commencement, so we can notify you of
alumni positions.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Treasury Dept., U. S. Secret Service,
Detroit, Mich. - Positions for Special
Agents. BA degree in Police Sci., Crim-
inology, Law Enforcement or related
field OR Bus. Ad. subjects. Higher level
position with adv. degree.
State of Conn.-Physical Therapist-
Opening at State of Conn.'s Mansfield
Sch. & Hosp. for the retarded. Require
graduation from an AMA approved sch.
of physical therapy.
Washington Civil Service-Therapies
Supv.-BS with major in Occupational
Therapy, Phys. Therapy, Hosp. Rec.,
manual arts, Vocational Counseling or
Psychiatric Social Work. plus 5 prs.
exper.
Management Consultants in East-
Ass't. to V.P. Marketinfi-Admin. Sales
Mgr. Degree in CHE or ME, pref. with
adv. degree in Bus. Ad. At least 10 yrs.
exper. in sales admin.
City of Chicago, Dept. of Air Pollution
Control-Opening for Engineers-ME,
ChE, at levels II, III, & IV. BS degree
for lowest level positions. Exper. re-
quired for higher level positions.
WJRT-TV, Flint, Mich. - Promotion
Assistant-young woman for full time

I

I

I

I

Tomorrow & Thurs., $1.75.

Fri., $2.00

Box office ope to-izorrow 10 a.in. to curtain time
For information call NO 8-6300

..r.......

i

"

"M

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