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December 06, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-12-06

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I., . k 111.1

I

PAGE Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1963

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6,1963

LASER LIGHT SOURCE USED:
Scientists Unveil Lensless Photography

i

Across Campus

By STEVEN HALLER
If current research is any cri-
terion, the shutterbug of the next
century may be able to take pic-
tures with a lensless camera, but,
he would need a portable laser
source to do so.
According to Juris Upatnieks of
the Institute of Science and Tech-
nology, however, studies of lens-
less photography now being car-
ried out here are being restricted
to the new field's applications in
the laboratory.
Emmett N. Leith, also of IST,
explained that the value of a
lensless optical system is its use-
fulness in facilitating such lab-
oratory processes as electron mic-
roscopy and X-ray photography.
It is not yet possible to construct
good lenses for these processes.
He added that lensless equipment
could also be used in combination
with lenses to convert a relatively
poor optical system into one of
high quality.
Laser Used
Lensless photography requires a
coherent monochromatic light
source--either a mercury are lamp,
fitted with a special filter, or a
laser, Upatnieks pointed out. The
laser light source uses a beam of
helium-neon light in which all
rays are of equal frequency, pro-
ducing a concentrated beam with
powerful penetration capabilities.
In the first step of lensless
photography, the laser light source
is trained on a transparent object.
This may be a photographic nega-
tive, an ordinary photographic col-
or slide or a microscope slide. At
the same time, a portion of the
laser beam is diverted around the
object with mirrors. Both the laser
light passing through the object
and that which is diverted are
caught on ordinary film by a lens-
less camera-like instrument on the
other side of the object.
No focusing of light beams takes
place on the film, since the instru-
ment has no lenses; consequently
the resulting picture is a mass of
blurs, similar to that shown in3
the above picture (left). It is dur-
ing the second step that this com-
pletely unintelligible smudge is
converted into a recognizable im-
age.

Prof. Michael Wallach of Duke "The Lower Depths" today at 8:30
University will speak on "Per- p.m. in Trueblood Aud.
sonality Correlates of Risk Tak-
ing" today at 4:15 p.m. in Aud B. Tag Day.
The "Galens Boys," members of
Being Earnest.. the Galens Honorary Medical So-
The University Players will pre- ciety, are holding their annual
sent Oscar Wilde's "The Import- Christmas tag-days today and to-
ance of Being Earnest" today at
R in Lvdi Mendelssohn morrow. The money collected is
IS .~i.AU. AL ..~J 44L. *V .*fnt.

"LEMMOr
j~mmo
Carat Lynlej
Deartdone
Edie Adams
Imo ncoca

DIAL 5-6290
* Shows f, 3, 5,7, 9P.M.
HELD OVER
Through Saturday
",4 IS HILARIOUS"
--TIME MAGAZINE
10:1
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a<O~
46 «+~~

*..

LENSLESS PHOTOGRAPHY-The picture of the little girl on the right was "developed" from the1
blurred "negative" on the left by shining a helium-neon laser light through it. Recently designed
by the Institute of Science and Technology, this method of laser-light photography will aid
greatly in electron microscopy and X-ray, photography.

In this second step, the smudge
is inserted into a lensless projec-
tor and a laser beam is again
trained upon it. If a screen or a
piece of light-sensitive paper is
placed at a precise distance from
the projector, a sharp, clear image
of the original object will appear,
greatly magnified, as in the above
picture (right).
Without the laser beam it would
be impossible to reconstruct an
image from such a blurred nega-
tive, because important "data"
carried in the light beam are lost
when the beam is recorded pho-
tographically.
The rays that comprise an ordi-
nary beam each have their own
intensity or brightness. But the
rays also have a characteristic
called phase, which roughly means
that some rays are ahead of oth-
ers, and some lag behind. It is
this phase data which is lost in
recording. Unless the phase of the
rays can be recorded on the blur-
red negative, reconstruction of the
image is impossible.
Intensity Variations
In the new technique of Leith
and Upatnieks, the camera-like
device converts this phase data in-
to intensity variations, which then
can be recorded on ordinary pho-
tographic film. This is the key to
the process.
To convert phase into intensity,

a portion of the laser light is made
to bypass the object and is beamed
directly into the camera; this is
called a reference beam. It com-
bines with the light reflected from
the object, producing a phenomen-
on known as interference. It is
this interference between the two
components of light which con-
verts the phase data into intensity
variations, which are then record-
ed by the film.
To reconstruct the image, the
projector-like device shines a beam
of coherent light through the blur-
red negative. An interaction be-
tween the film and the light causes
the light rays to be grouped into
patterns similar to those which
were photographed by the camera.
These new rays are convergent, or
aimed toward each other, whereas
the original rays were divergent.
Consequently, they form an image.
Unnecessary Lens
This redirecting of the rays is
normally done by a lens, but since
the reconstruction process auto-
matically does this, the lens is no
longer needed.

Enlargement occurs in both
steps of the process. In the first
step, the light waves begin to
spread out after they pass through
the object, thus spreading the im-
age of the object over a large area
of the film. In the second step,
the light waves from the projec-
tor's laser are made to spread out
before they pass through the blur-
red negative. As the diverging
waves pass through the negative,
the negative forces the waves to
begin converging again; in effect,
the negative focuses the waves, a
phenomenon that has been known
to scientists for some time.
Upatnieks added that he and
Leith were now going to turn their
attention more toward scientific
applications of the new technique
and leave most of the future de-
velopment of actual equipment to
any interested commercial firms.
Leith noted that the technique is
now at a stage where such com-
mercial development is feasible,
although no company has under-
taken the task as yet.

Theatre.
Generation Presents .. .
Generation will sponsor poet
Jerry Badanes reading selections
of his own works today at 8 p.m.
at the Wesley Foundation, State
and E. Huron.
PTP...
The Professional Theatre Pro-
gram will present the Association
of Producing Artists in Gorky's
Vote 'Mikado'
Cancellation
The executive board of the Gil-
bert and Sullivan Society has vot-
ed against rescheduling the can-
celled performances of "The Mi-
kado" originally scheduled for
Nov. 22 and 23.
The inability to secure a theatre
and personnel problems were cited
as major influences in this deci-
sion by the board.
G & S will mail refunds for
tickets sent to its office in the
SAB before Friday, Dec. 13. In
addition, the SABsbox office will
be open for the issuing of cash
refunds from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
next Thursday.
At its meeting Wednesday night,
G & S elected Curtis Blanding,
'65E, president; Susan Morris,
Grad, vice - president; Thomas
Levy, '64, treasurer, Paula Levy,
secretary and Michael Baad, Grad,
business manager. Al Carr, '65E,
and Bryan Crutcher, '65E, were
chosen as technical directors and
William Donahue the music direc-
tor.
A mass meeting will be held in
the Michigan Union on Jan. 19 for
all persons interested in working
on the spring production, to be
given the second week in April at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

used to operate the Galens Work-
shop on the 13th floor of the Uni-
versity Hospital where recuperat-
ing children may play with toys
furnished by the Galens. The
money also pays teachers in the
workshop and provides year-
round birthday gifts for the chil-
dren.
Townspeople will recognize the
medical students by their red
windbreakers and carrying col-
lection buckets. Some of the stu-
dents will be porting sandwich
boards with photographs of the
Galens Workshop.
This will be the 36th annual
Tag Day for the Galens Honorary
Medical Society. Members will be
located downtown and in the
State Street area as well as on the
main campus in an effort to col-
lect some $11,000.
Play Project ..
Pulitzer Prize winner John Her-
sey's "The Child Buyer" will be
the 1963-64 New Play Project of
the University's Professional
Theatre Program, Executive Di-
rector Robert C. Schnitzer an-
nounced today.
Dramatized by Paul Shyre, the
new adaption of the play will be
offered by a New York cast the
week of March 2 at Trueblood
Aud.' Marcella Cisney, who staged
Ethe Theatre Guild production of
"Skin of Our Teeth," will be the
dirteor.
"Because The Child Buyer'
deals with a highly significant
theme, it -offers us a splendid
opportunity to create a new ver-
sion for the University's audience.
We hope it will go on from Ann
Arbor to stir New York:and na-
tional audiences as well," Schnit-
Szer said.
Paul Shyre is well known for
his dramatizations of Sean 0'-
i Casey's "I Knock at the Door" and
"Pitcures in the Hallway," and of
John Dos Passos' "U.S.A." Both
Shyre and Hersey plan to attend
final rehearsals and performances
in Ann Arbor.

SUNDAY: "PALM SPRINGS WEEKEND"
TIE MICIIGAN UNION
presents
JAZZ and CIDERB
featuring the
20-piece U of M JAZZ BAND
directed by BRUCE FISHER
vocals by SHEI LAH BERNSTEIN
SATURDAY, DEC. 7... 4:00 P.M.
NORTH LOUNGE FREE CIDER
UNION FREE ADMISSION

I

Gilbert & Sullivan Society
Invites applications
for the position of
Dramatics Director.
If interested call:
Mary Ellen Mason, 662-5718

7

Order Your Subscription Today-
Phone NO 2-3241
Looking for Something Original and
Unusual for that Christmas Present?
visit.
MARTIN'S GEM &
MINERAL STUDIO
24 E WsintoAnnArbo
corner of 4th and E. Washington
We have Annykinso
handcraktedgifs
9Scandinavian glassware
0 Bo wenrs
and
mineral specimens and*
cutting equipment
Why not visit and buy your
gift needs here?
Many of you have.
OPEN 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. thru Dec. 24

I

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

Shows at
7-9 P.M.

d I T
@MM

DIAL
8-6416

The country that won World War 21/s* conquers
yourfunny-bone in the world's wackiest space race!
bernard cribbins ron moody david kossoff
terry-thomas
wxwa rsMtxow rwo.rou.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6
Day Calendar
Cinema Guild-Satyajit Ray's "Pather
Panchali": Architecture Aud., 7 and
9 p.m.
Psychology Colloquium-Dr. Michael
Wallach, Duke Univ., "Personality Cor-
relates of Risk Taking": Aud. B, Angell
Hall, 4:15 p.m.

*Youll roar
at the furt her adventuresof
'The Mouse That Roared"
eastmancolor ~

11

Grad. School, 118 Rackham Bldg., not
later than Jan. 1.
The 1963 Putnam Exam. will be held.
in Room 311 W. Engin. from 9-12 and
2-5 Sat., Dec. 7. Those registered please
take note.
Joint Judiciary Council-Petitioning
reopened for positions on Joint Judi-
ciary Council & Committee on Stand-
ards and Conduct. Dec. 9, deadline date.
Pick up petitions weekdays in Dr. J.
Bingley's Office, 1011 SAB.
PLANS FOR MIDYEAR GRADUATION
EXERCISES
Thursday, Dec. 19, 1963, 2:00 p.m.
Time of Assembly: 1:15 p.m.
Places of Assembly
Regents, President and Other Exe-
cutive Officers, Minister, Speaker, Can-
didate for Regents' Citation, in
Room 1053 Natural Science Bldg.,
where they may robe.
Deans and Other Administrative Of-
ficials taking active part in the ex,-
ercises, in the Botany Seminar
Room 1139 Natural Sciences Bldg.,
where they may robe.
Members of the Faculties, in Room
2082 Natural Science Bldg., where
they may robe.
Students of the Various Schools and
Colleges, in Natural Science Bldg. as
follows:
SECTION A-LIT., SCIENCE AND
THE ARTS-Front part of audi-
torium, west section.
EDUCATION-Front part of audit.,
center section.
ARCH-Front part of aud., center
section (behind education)
LAW-Front part of aud., center
section (behind Architecture)
DEARBORN CAMPUS-Front part
of aud., east section.
SECTION B-G2AD-Rear part of
aud.-Ph.D. candidates, west side;
Masters candidates, east side.
SECTION C-ENGINEERING-Room
2071.
BUSINESS ADMIN.-Rm. 2071.
DENTISTRY-Rm. 2033 (north end)
PUBLIC HEALTH-Rm. 3033 (center,
behind Dentistry)
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Baha'i Student Group, Reflections on
Religion & Art, Dec. 6, 8 p.m., 500 E.
William, Apt. 3.
Cercle Francais, La Lecon, Tonight,
8 p.m., 2065 FB. Tickets still available.
M* *
Congr. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, Dis-
cussion, Isaac Adalemo: "World Uni-
versity Service," 12 Noon; "Hanging of
the Greens," 8 p.m.; Dec. 6, 802 Monroe.
* * *
Graduate Outing Club, Hike, Dec. 8,
2 p.m., Rackham Bldg., Huron St. En-
trance.
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Lecture:
"Christian View of Death" by Joseph
Bayly, Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m., Union.
Unitarian Student Group, Dec. 8, 7:30
p.m., Unitarian Church. Speaker: Dr.
John Pollard, "Hallucinogens and Cre-
ativity."

MUSIC-Rm. 2033 (south end, be-
hind Public Health)
NURSING-Rm. 2023 (west end)
PHARMACY, Rm. 2023 (center, be-
hind Nursing)
NATURAL RESOURCES-Rm. 2023
(east end, behind Pharmacy)
SOCIAL WOFK-Rm. 2023 (east end,
behind Natural Resources)
FLINT COLLEGE-Rm. 2004.
MARCH INTO HILL AUD. 1:45 p.m.
Academic Dress.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
Voice, Table to distribute CORE rec-
ords. Dec. 5, 6, 9, 10, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Fishbowl.
Michigan Region, USNSA, Blue Rib-
bon Students Comm. on Higher Edu-
cation, Dec. 6, 7, & 8, Aud. A and class-
rooms.
Michigan League, International Sis-
ters Coffee, Dec. 7, 10-11:30 a.m., Con-
course of League.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting of
December 4, 1963
Adopted: That the Office of Student
Affairs be requested to schedule a late

permission for Sat., Dec. 7, 1963. SGC
hereby gives its approval for such late
permission.
Adopted: That Homecoming 1964 be
calendared for Oct. 23, 24, 1964 (Minne-
sota game).
Adopted: That the interviewing com-
-mittee for the Membership Tribunal
be composed of: The Executive Com-
mittee, Ronald Wilton, Pat Elkins, Gary
Cunningham.
Adopted: That the first meeting of
1964 be held at 7:15 p.m. on Wed., Jan.
15, 1964.
(Continued on Page 8)

HELD OVER!1

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Dec.

"HILARIOUS" Detroit News

"SHEER DELIGHT"
Ann Arbor News

CHOICE
SEATS
NOW !

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MAGNIFICENT THEATRICALITY
STUNNING ... IT'S A HIT!

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TRIUMPHANT

INSPIRED ... SUPERB!
--News

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