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November 27, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-27

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER ?7, 1963

Z'O W TEMCIG NDIYWENSA,--E1ER2,16

'GIVE-AWAY PROGRAMS':
Angell Cites Foreign Aid Role

By WILLIAM CUMMINGS
According to Prof. Robert C.
Angell of the sociology depart-
ment, the question the country
now faces is "whether the United
States will lead or be led."
Terminating the International
Student Association fall series of
lectures with an address on "Cul-
tural Integration for a World So-:
ciety," Prof.Angell explained our
break with pre-war isolationist
policy by saying that "we made
up our mind the world was differ-.
ent during World War II."
He said that since that time,
America has sacrificed more than
any other nation for the world's
development; The problem today
lies in our relations with the un-
derdeveloped countries, Prof. An-
To Rebroadcast
Kennedy Story
Radio station WUOM will re-
broadcast, "The Legacy of John
Fitzgerald Kennedy," -a one-hour
documentary, at 7 p.m. tomorrow.
Displaying "the major themes
of President Kennedy's adminis-
tration as taken from recordings
of his public speeches,' the sta-
tion has already received many
requests to use the documentary,
according to a WUOM spokesman.
Included in the presentation is
the speech the President made
here in 1960 when, as the Demo-
cratic presidential candidate, he
first proposed the Peace Corps.
STARTS THURSDAY
THE LADY LAWYER
WEN T0f
COURT I -
M IC4AELCRAIG
MARY PEAC+*
BRENDA DEBANZIE
JAMES ROBERTSON
JUSTI C

gell pointed out, adding that the
government-sponsored aid pro-
grams are not sufficient.
Mobilization Needed
"These give-away programs
don't tap the great fund of pri-
vate American capital. If we are
going to continue in our leader-
ship, we have to mobilize this
capital," Prof. Angell indicated.
However, America is faced with
two difficulties when it invests in
underdeveloped countries, Prof.
Angell noted. For one thing, pri-
vate business is not willing to in-
vest unless it receives sufficient
indications of profit and security.
Further, .how can American firms
invest abroad without seeming to
exploit the recipient countries,
Prof. Angell queried.
He also mentioned the current
problem the United States is in-
volved in with Argentina in il-
lustrating the second difficulty.
In the development of these
countries, Prof. Angell pointed out,
the population explosion is one
force outside the control of the
United States. He questioned the
wisdom of even trying to help dis-
tressed countries if they make no
effort to halt their population
growth.
Prof. Angell traced the develop-
ment of America's cultural system
as background for his assertion.'
After 1920, with the development
of mass communications, mass ed-
ucation and widespread mobility,'
America entered its latest phase of
society. The phases prior to this
were rural society and the indus-j
trial revolution.
No Monopoly
Prof. Angell said that although
he feels that contemporary mass'
culture makes for superficial stim-
uli, its beneficial decentralized
pluralism insures the nation
against the monopoly of political
power by any one interest.
Prof. Angell did not feel, how-
ever, that contemporary America
provides a good cultural model for
the underdeveloped countries. He

PROF. ROBERT C. ANGELL
... lead or be led?
noted that decentralization proved
to be the best way to develop
America because of its abundant
natural resources. "The undevelop-
ed nations are not so fortunate
and will have to use different
methods, he indicated.
Cannon Dies
After .illness
Prof. Emeritus Joseph H. Can-
non, who retired from the electri-
cal engineering department in 1953
after 36 years as professor, died
Saturday at his Ann Arbor home.
He joined the University faculty
in 1917 as an associate professor
and was named professor in 1920.
Prof. Cannon served in several
teaching assignments before and
after his long tenure at the Uni-
versity, including service as acting
head of electrical engineering at
the University of the Philippines
immediately after his retirement.

Chin Notes
Communist
Movements
By ROSALIE BAINE
and LEONARD PRATT
"The Young Communist League
in Communist China shows that
totalitarian government differs
from autocracy, dictatorship and
fascism," Prof. Robert Chin of
Boston University said yesterday.
Speaking on "Communist Chi-
nese Youth Leagues: Models for
Change," Prof. Chin noted that
the one million branches of the
youth league have been second
only to the Communist Party in
importance within China, since
the government consolidated all
youth groups to form the League
in 1957.
However, Prof. Chin pointed
out, the League faces problems.
Drawing on material from a Chi-
nese newspaper, he said that the
struggle between democratic cen-
tralization and centralized lead-
ership cause an ambiguity in the
position of the "elected" secretary
of the branch. The opinion is that
the secretary cannot force his
views upon the members, but that
he should not "shirk responsibil-
ity.
Why No Improvement?
The members of the groups have1
lived for the last 14 years, the'
greater part of their lives, under
Communist rule. They cannot un-
derstand why conditions have not
improved in such a great length
of time.
Another problem is the conflict
between two desirable objectives,
such as attending League meet-
ings and studying. In spite of
strict membership rules and in-
spection, opportunists seeking to
further their political futures gain
membership. These are not com-
pletely "sincere' members, Prof.
Chin pointed out.
'Social Mystique'
Prof. Chin stressed the point
that Communist totalitarianism
differs greatly from more conven-
tional forms of dictatorship. The
element present in Communist to-
talitarianism which is lacking in
simple dictatorship, autocracy or
fascism is what Prof. Chin called
a "social mystique." He defined
this mystique as a sense of pur-
pose for the society in the past,
present and future.
Noting the relation of the indi-
vidual to this mystique, Prof.
Chin mentioned the fact that
every individual's actions must
find a place in the social mystique.
Such basic human actions as dat-
ing and marriage, vocation, and
conversation must find a place
within the social mystique of Com-
munist totalitarianism, Prof. Chin
noted.
"A natural extension of this,"
Prof. Chin said, "is that the indi-
vidual cannot be allowed to ques-
tion the social mystique: for if he
does, the lives of everyone in the
society lose their meaning." Prof.
Chin went on to say that this re-
sults in what we usually consider
to be the "brainwashing" inherent
in the Communist system.
Prof. Chin commented that this
extension of the mystique has
given the Communist countries a
good deal of trouble, as it tends to
regulate everything within the so-
ciety. He said this has been com-
batted by keeping decisions on as
low a level as possible.
Bucket Drive
To Aid Widow
A bucket drive will be conducted
today for the widow of J. D. Tip-
pitt, the Dallas patrolman killed

Friday in an attempt to capture
Lee H. Oswald, the alleged assas-
sin of President John F. Kennedy.
The one-day drive is being
sponsored by the Student Non-
violent Coordinating Committee,
Young Americans for Freedom,
Young Democrats and Young
Republicans. Representatives of
these organizations will be sta-
tioned with the buckets at the
Michigan Union, the Fishbowl and
the Diag.

Tihe Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
[Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
respwnsibility. Notices should be
w 3aen in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Roord 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27
Day Calendar
Dept. of Anatomy Seminar-Henry
van der Schalie, Prof. of Zoology, "Prob-
lems of Disease Control in Underdevel-
oped Areas": 2501 East Medical Bldg..
1:10 P.M.
Doctoral Examination for Ralph Irv-
ing Blouch, Wildlife Management; thes-
is: "The Response of Deer to a Forest-
Wildlife Management Program on the
Mid Forest Lodge," today, 1032 Natural
Resources Bldg., at 2 p.m. Chairman,
w. W. Chase.
Doctoral Examination for Janice Ma-
rie Erskine, Psychology; thesis: "S-R
Interval in Short-Term Memory for
Paired-Associates." today, 341.9 Mason
Hall, at 10 a.m. Chairman, A. W. Melton.
Doctoral Examination for Poul Scheel
Larsen, Mechanical Engineering; thes-
is: "The Dynamics of Gas-Vapor Bub-
bles in Binary Systems," today, 329 W.
Engrg., at 4 p.m. Chairman, J. A Clary.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
University Lutheran Chapel, Thanks-
giving Day Service, Sermon: "Bread &
Words," Vicar John Koenig, Nov. 28,
9:45 a.m., 1511 Washtenaw.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Doctoral Examination for Isabelle Se-
gal, Education; thesis: "Choice of Level
of Teaching. A Study of Personality
Factors Affecting Specialization within
the Teaching Profession," today, 4019
UHS, at 1 p.m. Chairman, w. C. Morse.
Doctoral Examination for Fumio Hi-
rayama, Nuclear Science; thesis: "Ener-
gy Transfer and Quenching in Plastic
Scintillators," today, 310 Auto. Lab., at
2:30 p.m. Chairman, Chihiro Kikuchi.
Doctoral Examination for Peter Emil
Manni, Pharmaceutical Chemistry; thes-
is: "A Chemical Investigation of Gym-
nema sylvestre R. Br. Leaves," today,
2407 Chemictry Bldg., at 2 p.m. Chair-
man, J. E. Sinsheimer.
Doctoral Examination for Kalman
Benyamini, Psychology; thesis: "Exper-
imental Effects of Hypnotically Induced
Anxiety, Arousal, and Inhibition," to-
day. 3419 Mason Hall, at 9 a.m. Chair-
man, G. S. Blum.
Aeronautical and Astronautical Engi-
neering Seminar: Prof. Sydney Chap-
man, senior research scientist, CST, will
talk on "Rockets, Satellites and Earth-
Science Problems," today, 4 p.m., Room
1042 E. Engrg. Bldg.
Botanical Seminar: "On the Control
of Cellular Morphogenesis in Plants"
by Dr. Paul B. Green, Univ. of Pa. At
4:15 p.m. in 1139 Natural Science Bldg.
Biological Chemistry: Presents Dr.
David M. Greenberg speaking on "The
Transsufuration Process in the Mam-
mal Enzymes and Reactions." at 4 p.m.
in M6423 Medical Science Bldg.
IGeneral Notices
Student Accounts: Your attention is
called to the following rules passed by
the Regents at their meeting on Feb.
(Continued on Page 5)

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