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November 24, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-24

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PAGE TWO

-THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1963

,AE. OTEMCIA AL SNA.NVME 4 9~

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IN

COOPERA TION:
Oxford Displays
Self-Government

By MARGE LOWE
Student government is one of
the areas in which the Oxford Rd.
Project differs from other Univer-
sity women's housing.
Although Oxford operates under
rules set for all women's resi-
dences, its government is more
adaptable to residents' wishes, less
structured than dorm governments
and more liberal in regard to resi-
dents' privileges.
Each of the four cooperatives
has a separate government; there
is a fifth governing body fior
suites, as well as one for apart-
mrents. They are autonomous
groups, but they have been
brought together in an informal
presidents' council. - -
One? Six?,
The major question now con-
fronting the group of presidents
is whether Oxford housing should
Regents Cite
ssignments
The Regents approved the fol-
lowing off-campus assignments at
their Iovember meeting :
Off-campus assignment for Dr.
Robert E. L. Berry from Feb. 1
through March 31, 1964, to serve
on the Hospital Ship S.S. Hope.
Off-campus assignment for
Prof. Whitmore Gray of the Law
School for the second semester
and the summer session to study
and do research on Communist;
law in Formosa and in Hong Kong.
Off-campus assignment for
Prof. G. Hoyt Whipple of the.
Medical School from Nov. 1
through Nov. 25, to carry out a
comparative study of nuclear safe-
ty practices in the United States
and Europe.

act as one unit or as six separate
houses.
"There is an overall feeling of
unity in Oxford, yet many wo-
men there feel that because of the
three different types of living
units, many problems can only
be dealt with by the individual
governing bodies," A s s e m b 1 y
Housing Chairman Ann Walter,
'65N, said.
Women in Oxford apartments
are predominantly seniors and
graduate students, while residents
of suites are mainly sophomores
and juniors. Residents of coopera-
tives are freshmen and sopho-
mores.
Differences of Interest
Because of age differences, it is
felt that there are also differences
of interest. Rules that work in
apartments will not necessarily be
successful in suites and co-ops.
"The girls in suites, and many
of those in apartments, do not
know many other residents and
are not interested in student gov-
ernment," Miss Walter said.
Socratic Method
The presidents' council does not
have a constitution and is organ-
ized on a question-and-answer
basis, Miss Kirkpatrick explained.
It is a coordinating body that has
no real power to make decisions,
she said.
There are fewer permanent
committees in Oxford government.
Special committees dealing with
athletics, music, scholarships and
alumni are formed as needed.
Visitor regulations at Oxford are
more liberal than in other wo-
men's dorms. Residents of suites
are allowed to have male guests
on football Saturdays from 11 a.m.
to 7 p.m. and from noon to 8 p m.
on Sundays. Apartment residents
may have male guests from noon
until five minutes before closing
every day.

Gottlieb
Describes
Deviance
By CHARLES LESAK
"We now believe that there is
a mechanism in certain schizo-
phrenic patients that is respon-
sible for some aspect of their bio-
logical maladaption," Dr. Joel
Gottlieb of the University Hospi-
tal said recently.
Speaking on "Biological Adap-
tions in Schizophrenia," Dr. Gott-
lieb explained that schizophrenia
is a very loose term and covers
many different types of mental
disorders. It can be likened to the
old medical use of the term "ane-
mia," which was used to describe
a wide range of related blood dis-
eases, he added.
Schizophrenia can be "serious
and vicious": in fact, it is the
most dangerous mental illness, as
it is responsible for over 50 per
cent of all patients in mental hos-
pitals, he commented.
More Like Home
To illustrate the sensitivity of
a schizophrenic mind, Dr. Gott-
lieb described an experiment in
which 10 men and 10 women from
a state mental hospital were
brought to a place where they en-
joyed a more life-like social at-
mosphere.
In this attempt at "re-socializ-
ing" these people, seven of the
original 20 recovered sufficiently
to be put in the care of relatives
at home, he said. The remaining
13 patients, who could not be re-
leased, were relocated in different
sections of the hospital.
Influential Factors
It has been shown that psycho-
logical and sociological factors
have a great influence on a per-
son's development, particularly if
the mind becomes diseased, he
commented. There are also cer-
tain physiological factors that
may either cause schizophrenia or
amplify its symptoms, Dr. Gottlieb
added.
The results of early experiments
with the physiological nature of
schizophrenia pointed toward the
existence of some substance in the
blood that is unique and found
only in diseased persons. When an
extract of this substance was in-
jected into the blood of a normal
person or animal, it had profound
effects on the subject, comparable
in- intensity to the effects of such
hormones as adrenalin or thy-
roxin.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is thev
second in a series of articles on the
Curriculum Development Program
in Juvenile Delinquency being car-
ried out by members of the sociolo-
gy department, social work school
and Institute for Social Research.)
By JEFFREY GOODMAN
Group work programs for stu-
dents who drop out of high school
before graduation, who experience
academic failures despite intellec-
tual capability, and who misbe-
have in school are the focus of a
project directed by Professors
Robert Vinted and Rosemary Sar-
ri of the social work school.
Professors Vinter and Sarri are
working under a federal govern-
ment grant on one of 12 projects
of the Curriculum Development
Program in Juvenile Delinquency.
The program involves six other
professors and numerous project
directors from the social work
school, sociology department and
Institute for Social Research.

AIa

The International Center's Dinner
HAS BEEN CANCELED
out of respect to the
late President of the United States,
John Fitzgerald Kennedy.

OTIVATIONAL RESEARCH:
Professors Study JuvenileDelinquency

I

Join tus on our 15th Anniversary Year
STUDENT TRAVEL...
STUDENTS CAN AFFORD!

STUDENTS, FACULTY
C/ihew Ii/4( /EPRESENTS
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
Call 662-8871
for*
Further In formation

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ENDING TUESDAY
SHOWS AT 1:00
2:50-4:55
6:55 AND 9:05

This
eek's
Events,
MONDAY, NOV. 25
8:30 p.m.- The Professional
Theatre Program will present
"Brecht on Brecht" in Hill Aud.
as the opening attraction of the
Play of the Month series.
The cast, headed by Lotte Lenya,
original star of the "Three Penny
Opera," will perform a living an-
thology of the plays, songs, poems
and letters of the German play-
wright-poet, Bertolt Brecht.
TUESDAY, NOV. 26
4 p.m.-Prof. Robert Angell of,
the sociology department will
speak on "Cultural Integration in
Today's World-Is It Possible?"
in the Multipurpose Rmf. of the
UGLI. The lecture is sponsored by
the International Students Asso-
ciation.
4:15 p.m.-Prof. Robert Chin of
Boston University will speak on
"Communist Chinese Youth
Leagues: Models of Change" in the
Social Work Aud. of the Frieze
Bldg.
8:30 p.m.-The Julian Bream
Consort will give the third concert
in the University Musical Society's
Chamber Arts series in Rackham
Aud.
The Julian Bream Consort is a
six-member ensemble performing
music of the Elizabethan and Ja-
cobean ages. The group includes
a lute, pandora,hcittern, viol, flute
and violin. Works by Peter Phil-
lips, John Dowland, Thomas Cam-
pian, Thomas Morley and Richard
Allison will be included on the
program.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 27
1:10 p.m.-Prof. Henry Van Der
Schalie of the zoology department
will speak on "Problems -of Disease
Control in Underdeveloped Areas"
in Rm. 2501 of the East Medical
Bldg.

PROF. ROBERT D. VINTER
... work programs
The current group work, in five 1
southeastern Michigan junior and
senior high school systems, is
based in a large part on studies
begun two years ago. From these
and other studies, a training man-
ual for youth social workers (pro-
fessionals or volunteers with spe-
cial training in handling youths)
has been written.
Only Evaluation So Far
"However, most of the results
from the group programs are only
now being evaluated," Prof. Sarri
explained.
According to a statement of the
perspectives and research plans
for the project, the group work
programs are directed toward the
components of a student's devi-
ance which stem from his inter-
action with other pupils, teachers
and the academic tasks of the
curriculum, Prof. Sarri said.
The program is predicated on
the assumption that. the school,
although its primary goal is edu-
cational, also has an obligation to
its pupils' "social development and
preparation for citizenship."
No Motivation
However, the school's education-
al and social goals are confounded
by the lack of motivation or un-
responsiveness to classroom be-
havior standards that many stu-
dents display.
Thus the group work programs
have three objectives:
1) To resolve the difficulties
which curtail effective learning;
2) To strengthen commitment
to educational objectives and com-
pletion of school; and,
3) To modfiy behaviors which
are disruptive of classroom proce-
dure and school management.
The groups of students are made
up of 5-10 students referred by
school personnel or selected from
examination of school records and
student behavior. Students in each
group have similar problems as
far as can be determined.
Paired Off
The group meets weekly during
school hours. Where possible, pu-
pils referred for service are indi-
vidually matched according to
their particular problems and then
randomly assigned to experimen-
tal and control groups. Those in
the control group receive all cus-
tomary attention in the school
except the group service.
The activities of the group cen-
ters on "public recognition of pu-
pil difficulties and mutual assist-
ance in resolving them," according
to the project prospectus.
"Group discussions and activi-
ties are focused on actual prob-
lems manifested in school and on
mobilizing pupil motivation to
change and achievement. The
powerful forces of peer pressure
and judgment are thus harnessed
in the service of desired change,
rather than tacitly supporting
continued deviance."

The primary targets of the1
group's activities are the values4
and goals of members, their self-r
images, their recognition of avail-]
able opportunities for successful]
social and school performance, the<
development of social skills es-'
sential for the desired interaction1
patterns, and aid for those aca-
demic abilities, such as study:
habits, with which the group can
deal.
The practitioners' manual de-
veloped by Profs. Vinter and Sarri
sets forth numerous guidelines for
the implementation of these goals.
This manual is both the result of
past and current studies and a
standard for the group programs
now under way.
The first task of the worker
leading each group is to ensure
recognition of the purpose of the
group, which is the successful
resolution of individual problems
through group and worker influ-
ences, discussions and activities.
It is essential that the worker
make himself an object of iden-
tification, as regards behavior and
values, by establishing his person-
al interest in the members and his
ability to understand their prob-
lems.
"What is desired is that within
the first session there is a shared
recognition of the academic prob-
lems and difficulties in peer and
teacher relationships among mem-
bers, and acceptance of these
problems as targets for coopera-
tive efforts," the manual states.
Thus the worker will want to
initiate the norm that all diffi-
culties in and out of school are
to be discussed within the group.
He will have to reward members
for bringing up these problems
and for helping others solve them.
Correct Image Needed
It is also necessary, the manual
states, that the members of the
group have a correct image of
their inclusiion in it. The two ex-
tremes-that they are being re-
warded for deviant behavior or
that they are a group of "trouble-
makers"-must be avoided. The
group must be able to explain it-
solution of social and academic
self as a legitiimate means for the
problems.
Numerous means are available
to the worker in interesting mem-
bers in the problem focus of the
group. These means center around
his encouragement of free discus-
sion of individual problems, his
suggestion of alternate modes of
behavior, his urging the members
to propose these possibilities them-
selves, and his attention to mani-
festations of the problems within
the group itself. A further device
is his recalling of past discussions.
relating to problems being dis-
cussed at the time and his selec-
tion of program activities which
bring the problems into focus and
offer opportunities for their solu-
Do It Yourself
Whenever possible, the group
leader will try to involve members
in working out solutions them-
selves. Thus he will encourage the
expression of opinions from other
students on a given student's
problems, support intra-group
censuring of individual members,
point out realistic consequences
of given behavior and bring to
the group's attention all examples
of progress by members.
Furthermore, in order for the
group to be effective in maintain-
ing the types of norms which the
worker desires, he will have to
mobilize members to invoke sanc-
tions on one another in regard to
these goals. The worker will also
have to use his influence on what-
ever hierarchal structure in the
group is carried over from outside.
Thus if fighting ability is high-
ly valued and the most hostile
members are regarded as the peer
leaders, the worker will discuss
this situation with the members
and try to bring them to agree to
other criteria for leadership.
The particular activities in

which emphasize interaction diffi-
culties, which can lead to acquisi-
tion of social skills in dealing with
peers and adults or which are:
likely to enhance the self-esteem
of members (helping a member
with a low self-image to fulfill
leadership functions by choosing
an activity in which he excels.
The members should actively
participate in the choice of the
specific activities, the manual con-
tinues.
According to Prof. Sarri. "it is
hoped that from this study will
come not only more certain knowl-
edge of effective group methods
but also increased understanding
of the patterns of deviance and
under-achievement in youths with
general social and school prob-
lems."

GENERAL INTEREST -
PROGRAMS
Overt25 itineraries featuring
WXestern & Central Europe
Scandinavia
Israel . . . Spain,. .
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STUDY TRAVEL
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SPECIAL
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STARTING
TODAY

r,&,v MICHIGAN

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SHOWS AT
1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 P.M.

w

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and. those -Ym n'.Girs.with
Yes-Yes'ontheir Iips...and
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Al'AWMWpwRffLEiWCKGI . . MER
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ELVIS PRESLEY in "FUN IN ACAPULCO"

which the group engages, other
than discussion, are also highly
important, according to the man-
ual: "Group experiences are in
essence a microcosm of situations
the members find themselves in:
outside of the group."
To the end that activities give
members an opportunity to deal
with. and resolve problem situa
tions, they will include those

co-starring
Produced on Broadway by FREDERICK BRIS SON and ROGER L STEVENS' Based on the stage play by LAWRENCE ROMAN
Screenplay by LAWRENCE ROMAN and DAVID SWIFT - Produced by FREDERICK BRISSON -Directed by DAVID SWIFT
XTRA! "The Critic" A COLUMBIA PICTURES RELEASE vnMYCOLOR
Only 4 Minutes Long But,.

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Your bike has
feelings, too!I

DIAL 8-6416

Continuous Today From 1 P.M.
"RIPE ... RACY . .
COMEDY! GO SEE IT!"
-Crowther, N.Y. Times

I

Bring

it in

for a complete
- WINTERIZATION

it's all about
brides who
discover their
hidden talents!

I

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