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November 23, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1
SATUTRDAY. NOVEMBER 2Si1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Evans Views Health Education

6~-~..-

By JOCELYN DANIELS

"The university must view edu-
cation for the health professions
in terms of the total life process,"
Dr. Lester J. Evans said yesterday
in his fifth and final lecture of the
William W. Cook series.
Dr. Evans cited several steps the
University can take to keep pace
with the rapidly changing social,
scientific and educational scenes.
in these areas.
He recommended the establish-
ment of a laboratory of human
biology where the psychological,
social and cultural aspects of be-
havior could be studied in relation
to the biology of man.
Expanded Curriculum
There is also a need for medi-
cal students to study more in the
areas of social science and the hu-
manities, Dr. Evans added.
The field of patient care should
be expanded to study the patient
in his home and community and to
view the patient in terms of social,
cultural and psychological influ-
ences, he said.
The existing separation between
mental and physical illness, as a
factor of the psychological influ-
ences, must be reduced, Dr. Evans
commented.

"Thus the function of the uni-
versity is to bring the clinical pro-
grams together," he said.
New Emphasis
Dr. Evans predicted that socie-
ty will place more emphasis on
emotional, psychological and so-
cial problems, and the University
must anticipate changes in the
types of specialty education.
"It will be two to four years
before the desired changes can be
realized. Since the present curric-
ulum can't stand the pressure for
major change longer than 10 to 20
years, it is advisable for the uni-
versity to get a head start," he
said.
"If the university is to maintain
its crucial position in the contin-
uing evolution of American health
and medicine, the university and
its health professional schools
must act together with clear vision
and renewed energy," Dr. Evans
claimed.
Keen Perception
"The university must have a
keen perception of the varied goals
of health professional education
and research and how the assets
of the university can be brought
to bear in achieving these goals,"
he commented.

Sororities
To Recruit
Members
By MARGARET LOWE

NAACP Criticizes DAC
For Unpeaceful Tactics

dm-=

DR. LESTER J. EVANS
... health education
"In other words, there should
be no doubt that the activities of
the medical center are in the uni-
versity by design and for a pur-
pose vital to the university," Dr.
Evans concluded.

ENDING TODAY
Br acdway 'sComedy Smlash
Evenl Funnier on the Screen

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Panhellenic Association Presi-
dents' Council recently decided to
allow any woman who is a mem-
ber of a sorority that does not
have a chapter at the University
to become a "social member" of
one of the sororities on campus.-
A social member was defined as
a girl who can participate in sor-<
ority social activities but who can-
not be involved in such functions1
as pledging or chapter meetings.'
To become a social member one+
would go through regular rush,
but would be "off quota." That is,i
social members would not be in-]
cluded in the number of girls a+
house can pledge.7
National Sororities
Since there are few national
sororities that do not have a chap-
ter at the University, it was felt1
by the presidents that there wouldI
not be a large enough number of
women desiring to be a social
member to affect regular rush.
In the case that there are a
number of such women, the regu-
lar-rush plan would be changed
and an informal rush for social
members would be adopted.
In further action, Panhel Presi-
dent Patricia Elkins, '64, summed
up five constitutional changes that
have occurred in Panhel this year.
Rush Study
First, a provision for a continu-
ing rush study and evaluation
committee was added to Panhel
structure. Second, a mass meet-
ing will now replace chapter meet-
ings in opening Panhel elections.
Also district meetings for can-
didate speeches will be held.
Third, junior transfers will be
allowed to rush even though they
have not been at the University a
semester-a requirement for all
other rushees.
Fourth, secretary and secretrial
manager duties were combined,
and lastly, due were increased to
$2.

JAZZ and CIDER
CANCELLED

Across
Campus
The Gilbert and Sullivan So-
ciety will present "The Mikado"
at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. today in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
* *' *
The University Men's Glee Club
will present a joint Ohio State-
Michigan Glee Club concert at 7
p.m. and 9 p.m. today in Hill Aud.
* * *
The Professional Theatre Pro-
gram will present the Association
of Performing Artists in Gorky's
"The Lower Depths" at 8:30 p.m.
today in Trueblood Aud.
S *
The Cercle Francais will present
Ionesco's "The Lesson" in French
at 8 p.m. today in Rm. 2065 of the
Frieze Bldg.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Two days ago
the University released a letter
from the Direct Action Committee
stating six demands aimed at end-
ing discriminatory hiring on the
part of the University. DAC declar-
ed it would "shut" the Administra-
tion Bldg. in a picket if its demands
were not met. Following is the com-
plete text of statement by the local
NAACP concerning the situation:)
"The NAACP has an established
policy of non-violence in relation
to solving civil rights problems
and we neither condone nor sup-
port any efforts which are either
violent or accompanied by threats'
of violence.
"Therefore, we are view the
threats by DAC is unwelcome, un-
necessary and a potential source
of physical disorder in the com-
munity.
"However, none of us can af-
ford to dismiss DAC, the Black
Muslims or any group as crack-
pots. They in fact represent the'
bitterness and disillusion of many
citizens against traditional token
measures usually involved in solv-
ing human rights problems.
Support Negro
Appointments
The Ann Arbor Area Fair
Housing Association voted Thurs-
day night to support the position
that the next three appointments
to the Ann Arbor Human Rela-
tions Commission should be
Negroes who have been approved
by local civil rights groups.
Union
BaIIroom TONI
TG
Music by the Renegc

"These groups are growing in
number and influence and this
growth is directly correlated with
the inability of such organiza-
tions as the NAACP to secure
equal jobs, housing or educational
opportunities.
"Unless government employers
and school administrators make
definite commitments to solving
these problems on a more accel-
erated and expanded schedule,
the fact remains that problems
raised by DAC will become more
frequent and serious. The local
branch is greatly concerned with
some of the same problems raised
by DAC.
"However, our approach is that
we have scheduled a meeting next
week with Vice-President for Aca-
demic Affairs Roger W. Heyns. We
hope that this meeting will be
productive of more specific details
and schedules that will go beyond
the generalizations given to both
the DAC and the student human
relations board earlier this week.
Official Policy
"We are sure that the official
policy of the University is to em-
ploy without regard to race or
color, but the visible evidence is
that this policy is not put into
practice in many units of the Uni-
versity.
"Since this will be part of our
discussion with Heyns, we feel that
further comment should be de-
ferred until after this meeting. It
is the sincere hope of the NAACP
that the DAC will not follow
through with its threats of viol-
ence, but will work with the Uni-
versity and other civil rights_
groups to achieve the ends which
we all seek."

-a
DIAL 8-6416

IiI~HERShEg MINE:
COLOR BY DUXE ONEiAScOPF
----- STARTING SUNDAY---
IN YUMMY COLOR

it's all about
bridesho
discovertheir -
hidden talents!
JOSEPH E. LEVINE r¢¢r
UGO TOGNAZZI MARINA VLADY 1
anstActress-CanoesFlm Festival 1953
The Conjugal Bed
t ara story of the Queen Bee
MARCO FERRERIWALTR GILLER RaCCARpo ELLtoI" cI MAt*t"W POLIfOaG

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Continuous Today From 1 P.M.
"RIPE . .. RACY,..
COMEDY! GO SEE IT!"
-Crowther, N.Y. Times

.,, ,

0

Shows at 1:00-2:50
4:55-6:55 & 9:05

HILLEL SUPPER CLUB

SUNDAY at 5:30

75c

H LLEL FOLK SINGERS
Organizational Meeting
Sunday at 7 P.M.
OPEN TO ALL

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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Just Published

I1

HARLAN HATCHER & ERICH A. WALTER
A Pictorial History
of the
GREAT LAKES
Now available at pre-publication price $8.50
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
1216 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
Telephone NO 3-9333
TODAY IS NOVEMBER 23
ABSOLUTELY YOUR LAST CHANCE
to see
SATURDAY MATINEE-2:00 P.M.
TICKETS-$1.00
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
DON'T MISS IT! 6
9~~~~~~~~ "><""o<""><""">o22aC""tf""

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
ofticial publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23
Day Calendar
Football-U-M vs. Ohio State, Mich.
Stadium, 1:30 p.m.
Gilbert & Sullivan Society-"The Mi-
kado": Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 2
and 8 p.m.
Joint Glee Club Concerts-U-M Glee
Club and Ohio State Glee Club: Hill
Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Elizabeth Taylor in
"Suddenly Last Summer": Architecture
Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Professional Theater Program-APA in
Gorky's "The Lower Depths": True-
blood Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Doctoral Examination for Denny No-
land Kaiser, Philosophy; thesis: "Lan-
guage, Law, and Morals," today, 2012
Angell Hall, at 8:45 a.m. Chairman,
Carl Cohen.
Doctoral Examination for Philip Keith
Davis, Engineering Mechanics; thesis:
"Motion of a Sphere in a Rotating
Fluid at Small Reynolds Numbers," to-
day, 206 W. Engrg., at 10 a.m. Chair-
man, C. S. Yih.
Doctoral Examination ftr Joseph An-
dre Amy, Chemistry; thesis: "New De-
velopments in the Electron Metallo-
graphic Study of Heat-Resistant Al-
loys," today, 3003 Chemistry Bldg., at
11 a.m. Chairman, L. O. Brockway.
Doctoral Examination for Wasyl Sh-
moniak, Education; thesis: "A Study of
Soviet Policies in Uzbekistan and Their
Implications for Education and Social
Change" today, 4015 UHS, at 10 a.m.
Chairman, W. K. Medlin.
General Notices
Queen's University, Belfast, Ireland
offers an exchange scholarship for a
U-M grad. The scholarship provides
fees, board and lodging for 1964-65.
A married student receives £185 in lieu
of board and lodging. A grant of $400
will be granted by the Grad School
toward cost of travel. Further infor-
mation and application forms are avail-
able at the Fellowship Office, Room

110, Rackham Bldg. Deadline for appli-
cations is Jan. 13, 1964.
The Student Automobile Regulations
will be lifted for Thanksgiving vacation
from 5 p.m., Wed., Nov. 27, until 8 a.m.
on Mon., Dec. 2.
Placement
PLACEMENT:
Merck, Sharpe & Dohme, Detroit,
Mich.-Professional Service Reps. - BS
Pharmacy or any other Science degree
pref. Will consider BA other field with
previous selling exper. Age 22-35 yrs.
Professional sales rep. tocall mainly
on physicians & promote new products;
will also call on pharmacies & hospi-
tals. Location : Mich., Ohio or Ky. 3-wk.
trng. prog. in West Point, Pa.
Ford Div., Ford Motor Co., Dearborn,
Mich.-IBM Programmers. BS Math or
BBA degree, interested in Programming.
No exper, required. Recent grads. Will
be asked to take aptitude test. Immed.
openings.
Walter Reed Army Medical Center,
Wash., D.C.-Research Biochemist -
Desire PhD in Biochem. with 3 yrs.
broad exper. including exper. in the
biochem. of the heart, Plans & develops
a res. prog. involving several successive
phases in order to conduct investiga-
tions of the fundamental biochem. &
biphys. changes that occur in the heart
affected by violent stress such as exer-
cise & excitement.
Wallace & Tiernan, Inc., Belleville,
N.J.-Various openings including: Sales
-Direct in the field selling. BS in ME,
EE, ChE, CE or equiv.; Dev., Chemist;
Research Chemist; Analyt. Chem.; ChE;
etc.
H. N. Hayes & Co., East Lansing, Mich.
-Industrial Sales position; Mich. Ter-
ritory for Mfgr's Rep. Prefer some En-
flineering bkgd. with sales interest. Will
train. Age up to 32. Need urgently.
Blaw-Knox, Pittsburgh, Pa.-1) Engi-
neer for kettles, autoclaves & special
engineered vessels. BSChE or BSME plus
3 yrs. exper. 2) Engineer for Evaporator
-Dairy-BSChE or BSME plus 5 yrs. ex-
per,
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
212 SAB-
American Student Information Serv-
ice, Europe-Applications have arrived
in the Summer Placement office. Stu-
dents interested may come in to look
over brochure.
Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited -
Applications for summer employment
available at Summer Placement.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
IVIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign interview schedule posted at 128-H
W, Engrg. for appts. with the following:
NOV. 27-
North American Aviation, Inc. - All
Degree Levels: Visit principally to fol-
low-up with those interviewed on reg-
ular visit of Oct. 7-8, but will also
consider new applicants,, especially adv.
degrees interested in regular adv. degree
visit scheduled for Dec. 5.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Amateur Radio Club, Organizational
Meeting, Nov. 26, 7 p.m., 4505 E. Engrg.
Everyone welcome.
Cinema Guild, Film: "Suddenly, Last
Summer," Nov. 23-24, 7 & 9 p.m., Archi-
tecture Aud.
Congr. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, After-
game Cider & Donuts, Nov. 23, 802

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