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November 22, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY

'H I C I A 'D A I L Y| F R||||||||IDA||Y|.|||||||||, ||||,l|,|| |,u,||||,||||||||||m||||m|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||,llm,,,,, , *-- -

College Unit
Encourages
ROTC Act
By LAURA GODOFSKY
Collegiate Press Service
CHICAGO - A proposed re-;
vision of the Reserve Officers
Training Corps program in the'
nation's colleges won endorsement
Tuesday from the Association of
State Universities and Land-
Grant Colleges.
The revamping would beef up
academic content of the ROTC
courses. Other major changes, de-
signed to increase the program's
output of high quality reserve of-
ficers for the Army and Air Force
would:
1) Set up a national scholarship
system offering higher training
payments; and
2) Permit junior college gradu-
ates and transfer students to en-
ter the program at the beginning
of their junior year.
The changes are contained in a
bill presented to the House armed
services committee yesterday.
The academic changes in ROTC
courses would e n a b1e ROTC
courses to meet educators' criti-
cisms and to permit cadets to re-
ceive degree credit for ROTC
classes. Flexibility of the revised
program would enable cadets at
some colleges to do most of their
actual military training at Army
and Air Force installations during
summer months.
The present program is produc-
ing about 14,000 officers yearly
for the Army and Air Force.

ENCOURAGE INDEPENDENCE:
Oregon Institutes Student Conduct Code

EUGENE, Ore.-A student con-
duct code for the University of
Oregon was recently released by
President Arthur S. Flemming.
The code was drawn up by a
student-faculty committee which
worked on the document during
the summer.
The group was appointed by
Flemming at the end of spring
term following a faculty motion

urging that regulation of student
conduct be based on the premise
that the development of responsi-
ble behavior is most effectively
realized by policies that encourage
independence and maturity.
Results, Not Means
The essence of the recommenda-
tion is that moral growth and
character development are "possi-

College Roundup

By STEVEN ZARIT
NEW HAVEN - Yale students
greeted Prof. Frederick Barg-
hoorn with a standing ovation at
a rally held in his honor Monday
night University President King-
man Brewster, Jr., flying back
from Italy to speak at the rally,
praised Prof. Barghoorn's integri-
ty, stating that no one ever be-
lieved that the professor had been
engaged in espionage.
* * *
LOS ANGELES - UCLA's stu-
dent publication, the Daily Bruin,
reported Richard Weisbart, presi-
dent of the Associated Students of
UCLA, reported "The biggest prob-
lem facing student government
today is how to personalize a
campus with over 25,000 students."
A proposed student course eval-
uation has been selected as one
way of dealing with the problem.
* * *
CHAPEL HILL - Chancellor
William B. Aycock of the Univer-

sity of North Carolina reaffirmed
that university officials would con-
tinue to oppose the state's ban
on controversial speakers. He la-
belled the law as detrimental to
the state in reply to threats by
State Sen. Adam Whitley that a
new board of UNC trustees more
favorable to legislature policies
would be elected if criticism of the
law persisted.
* * *
CAMBRIDGE-A plan to reor-
ganize the curriculum of Harvard
Law School so that students might
complete their courses in two years
rather than three was shelved this
week by a special committee of the
law school faculty. Sponsor of the
program, Prof. David F. Cavers,
said that the shortened program
would be a means of handling in-
creased law school applications.
He added that he would now ask
for a special meeting of the law
school faculty to consider his pro-
posal.

ble outcomes rather than primary
purposes of the university" and
should not be included within the
definition of the university's fun-
damental purposes.
It recommends that university
disciplinary responsibilities should
be distinguished from the con-
trol functions of the larger com-
munity: any action punishable
under the state criminal code
should not be treated as an offense
which may result in university
expulsion, the university should
not act as a "collection agency"
for bills in the community, and
the university should not discipline
students who have violated com-
munity rules in lieu of punishment
by the community.
A minority report, however, dis-
agreed with this position, stating
that university students have a
dual position in society and that it
is possible for them to violate rules
of both the university and the
community at once.
Gender Equality
The majority also contends that
the conduct of female students
should not be more restrictively
controlled than that of male stu-
dents; the minority view was that
"the enforcement of certain, rules
of conduct for women and not for
men is consistent with practice
and tradition in society generally."
The majority urged that actions
taken by the university's Office of
Student Affairs be subject to au-
tomatic review by a student-fac-
ulty committee when sanctions are
imposed, but the minority felt re-
view should be limited to error in
the disciplinary proceedings.

1I'

I

ISA CULTURAL COMMITTEE
presents
DR. ANGELL
speaking on
"Cultural Change for a World Society-
Is It Possible?"

0
4 '
" "

NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson

FRIDAY, 8:00 p.m., Fireside Chat, "Science and the Bible," led by
Fr. Brunett.
9:00 p.m., Hootenanny
sponsored by the Freshman class-
SUNDAY, After 12:30 Mass, "Overseas Service Planning Session"
7:00 p.m., Austerity Supper
Sacrifice for social justice $1.00

Tuesday
Nov. 26

4:00
Multi-purpose room, UGLI,

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Ann Arbor's Fine Restaurants

STEAK AND SHAKE
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
potatoes, salad, roll and butter
$1.25
CHAR BROILED HAMBURGER
35c
1313 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
?a'pu'4 oIn' 9ne 900d
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional Italian dish
1I Z ZAj1
will be served daily from.
12 Noon to 2 P.M. and 5 P.M. to ? A.M.
FREE DELIVERY
from 5 P.M. to 1:30 A.M.
INCLUDING NORTH CAMPUS
TAKE-OUT SERVICE AVAILABLE
Open Sun.-Thurs. 6: a.m.-1:30 a.m.
Fri. and Sat. 6 a.m.-3:00 a.m.
221 N. Main St. - Opposite the Post Office
Phone NO 8-9550 or NO 3-3857
Enjoy the Finest
CANTONESE
FOOD
Take-out Orders Anytime
Open Daily
from 1 1 a.m. to 10 p.m.c
Closed Monday-
.. ..

THE ROMANOFFS
GERMAN-AMERICAN CUISINE
COMPLETE TAKE OUT DINNERS
300 S. Thayer
CHEF ROMAN PHILLIPS-Proprietor
OLDIIEIIJEIBE

211-213 N. Main St.

NO 8-9753

Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily I 1 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays
Open 11 A.M. 1435 East
to 2 A.M. .. Michigan Avenue,
7 days a week -Ypsilanti
"- -HU 3-2840
DINING and COCKTAILS
SEAFOOD and STEAK
ORGAN MUSIC Tuesday thru Saturday
Community Singing

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We wouldn't
steer you wrong ..
We have the
finest pancakes
and waffles
in town!

FOWLER'S
Ann Arbor's First and Only
PANCAKE HOUSE
also featuring
Steaks, Sea Foods, Short Orders,

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