100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 21, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21

1, 1963
_
= ;'1

'Lower Dept

"The fact that there is not one
Germany, but a number of Ger-
many is a result of German poli-
cies in the past-a punishment or
reward for their own past values,"
Prof. Gerhard Weinberg of the
history department said recently.
Germany's cultural values affect
on her relations with other coun-
tries as well as the separation
within Germany itself, he said.
The religious values of the
Western world arrived in Germany,
in the third century and left Ger-
many in the twentieth century,
Prof. Weinberg said.
State of Flux
"West Germany is a society in
a state of flux. There are within
it signs po~inting to a value sys-
tem that would be highly congenial
to most Americans." But other
signs, such as the continuance in
prominent academic and govern-
ment positions of men with "im-
possible records," show the con-'
tinuance of non-Western values,
he said.
"Germany provides perhaps the
most dramatic example-perhaps
hard for us to understand-that
culture and technology have no
necessary basic tie. Given tech-
nological advance, will a value sys-
tem necessarily result?".
"I would be reluctant to hazard
a tentative conclusion about the
direction Germany will take," Prof.
Weinberg said.
Russia Trend
If Germany does not develop a
value system, he said, it is likely

to develop much as the USSR
would like to be. The USSR today
is developing in the direction of
a society that looks somewhat
like Germany of the 1890's.
A decision in favor of Western
values would very much affect
the division of Germany and of
Europe, he said. Although the
possibility of reunification is not
immediate, "in the long run, di-
vision will not be so terribly im-
portant." He cited the period after
the religious wars in Germany as
one of the times when "the divi-
sion in Germany was much more
serious than today."

Next semester approximately
one fourth of the students on cam-
pus will receive a questionnaire
on student labor at the Univer-
sity. According to Miss Freitag the
survey involves gathering informa-
tion on wages and working con-
ditions of students employed dur-
ing the school year.
In a motion passed recently by
SGC, Daily Editor Ronald Wilton,
'64, proposed that "the total man-
datory grading system should be
reviewed to ascertain whether or
not it may force an emphasis on
marks which might impede the
realization of the educational
goals this University holds."
CSC members are now studying
grading systems of other colleges
and universities and are discuss-
ing Wilton's proposal with the fac-
ulty and administration. They
plan to submit to SGC some pos-
sible alternatives.

I

/

GUYS & GALS-MEET YOUR PALS
20 TABLES FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT AT
THE COZY BILLIA

-mmmmmmmmvr

RDS
:T

I

IT'S FUN
IT S EXCITING
ESPECIALLY
wtDTE ~^

i

POCKE

I

B BILLIARDS
SNOOKER
NO 8-9729
314 S. FOURTH
AVE.

Acoss

NEW PLAY-Nancy Marchan
star in Maxim Gorsky's ,"The L
in Trueblood Aud. This is the 1
the Professional Theatre Prog
Artists in their Fall Festival.
CURRENT PROGRAMS
For Med ic(
(Continued from Page 1)
quired to attend one of thes
schools, however.
-An additional 50 freshma
spaces are to be provided by 197
as recommended by future stud
committee which would determin
by 1968 where and how thes
spaces could best be made avail
able.
--Every effort should be made t
obtain private support for the es
tablishment of a four-year pri
vately endowed medical school.
In noting the current need pri
marily for the state to suppor
the two existing schools, the re
port referred to the Medical Sci
ence Building Unit II, which th
Legislature was supposed to hav
built in 1951 when the Universit
expanded its freshman medica
enrollment to 200.

Campus

I

FR TH f1.EUL

DIAL
2-6264

0 STAT

SHOWS AT 1:00
2:50-4:55

6:55AND 9:05

_..._.=x _____

WHEELER DEALER ME~rS8(APER!
t A M A RNOff FW=ICION
LEE _ JAMES
REM iCK -GARNER
fELE
___l1
S.mWa R61COOR

SOON-
ELVIS PRESLEY in "FUN IN ACAPULCO"

Dr. Jacques S. Gottlieb of the
Lafayette Clinic in Dertoit will
speak on "Biological Adaption and
Schizophrenia" in the Main Con-
ference Rm. of the Mental Health
Research Institute at 2:15 p.m.
today.
Hrosvitha. .
Hrosvitha's "Callimachus" and
Menander's "The Girl From
Samos" will be the fourth offer-
ing of the Student Laboratory
Theatre at 4:10 p.m. today in the
Arena Theatre of the Frieze Bldg.
Sold Out.. .
The Professional Theatre Pro-
gram has announced that the
performance of "Brecht on Brecht"
scheduled for 8:30 p.m.. Monday
has been completely sold out.
Foreign Policy .. .
Prof. Bernard C. Cohen of the
University of Wisconsin wil speak
on "The Press and Foreign Policy"
at a round table discussion in
Rackham Assembly Hall at 8 p.m.
today.
Flavo protein ...
Prof. Vincent Massey of the
Medical School will speak on "The
Role of Semiquinones in Flavo-
protein Catalysis" at 4 p.m. today
in Rm. 1400 Chemistry Bldg. The
lecture, part of a Natural Product
Symposium which is being held in
conjunction with the Werner
Bachmann Memorial Lecture ser-
ies, is sponsored by the chemistry
department and the Institute of
Science and Technology.
JEWISH BOOK
FAIR
at
U LRICH'S
in co-operation with Hillel
NOV. 18-27

hs' To Debut Conference
Takes Stock
of NCATE
(Continued from Page 1)
cude members of the academic
, x disciplines in the planning of
teacher education programs.
Under Pressure
NCATE is working under pres-
sure. Meeting last spring, the Na-
tional Commission of Accrediting,
the group that accredits NCATE,
told the council that its continued
" j recognition was dependent on cer-
tain changes being made. Most of
the changes demanded by the
NCA were incorporated in the sug-
\ , gestions made last week.
Last year the battle with NC-
ATE broke into the open when
the agency told the University of
Wisconsin that it would grant
.only "provisional accreditation" to
-- its teacher graduates.
The dean of its education school,
Lindly J. Stiles, charges that
NCATE was using the threat of
non-accreditation in an effort to
keep rigid controls over teacher
education.
Deny Pressure
NCATE officials deny that any
pressure was brought by them and
point out that Wisconsin received
full accreditation of its program
d, Larry Linville and Kate Geer a few months, later.
ower Depths," at 8:30 p.m. today The time was spent, they say, to
ast production to be premiered by study further the Wisconsin pro-
ram's Association of Performing gram.
Before full accreditation was
_ _ granted, however, Wisconsin re-
ceived warnings from at least five
: neighboring states that its gradu-
ates might not be able to get jobs
Get Priorityin their schools.
This brought a warning from
NCA that "no state should stipu-
late either explicitly or implicity
1 ~ c oo is attendance at, admission to, or
graduation from an NCATE ac-
credited institution as the only
priorities in the capital outlay avenue to teacher certification."
request submitted to the Legisla- The Wisconsin affair brought
ture. To meet costs of $12 mil- the criticism that NCATE puts too
n lion, the University is asking for much stress on the structure of a
1 $10 million from the Legislature to school of education rather than
y be paid over the next three years on the quality of its output.
e and requesting $2 million from the Critics claim that of the two
e federal government under a health major purposes of NCATE-identi-
- research bill passed in 1956. fication of acceptable programs of
The expansion of WSU from teacher education and improve-
125 to 200 freshmen by 1968 may ment of the field- too much em-
0 hinge on the Wayne-Detroit $100 phasis on the former, purely me-
million medical center. As propos- chanical aspects.
ed for the center, the WSU medi- The NCA agreed with this criti-
cal school expanded facilities cism and last week the delegates
would cost the state about $14 seemed to be willing to make the
- million and the federal govern- change in emphasis and the other
ment $18.7 million from its college changes demanded of it.
e construction bill. Ready for Changes
e To meet the 1968 deadline will W. Earl Armstrong, an NCATE
require state funds starting over staff member, told a reporter that
I a three or four-year period next he felt the council was ready to
year. To Advance make "changes and refinements"
MSU will advance toward its 50 n its structure and operations, but
e student allotment by the admis- observers noted that the contro-
y sion of 25 potential MD graduates versy is not likely to end imme-
~ into its freshman class of the diaerlyh
Institute of Science and Biologyarldatfthe esganed
starting in the fall of 1965, Warren someekind thatof theredii a need for
Huff, chairman of the coordinat- se id of acrediting body in
ingcoucilanda mmbe ofthethe field of education and most
ing council and a member of the felt that NCATE should be that
MSU board of trustees, noted. fb Ndy.
'Unique Plan'b -----
The MSU institute is a "unique
plan" which will integrate medical Exhibit Shows
students seeking medical, doctor-
ate and veterinary degrees, Huff
explained. The medical students J w s o k
will participate in the institute
program for the non-clinical part A collection of books and manu-
of their training-the first three scripts in Hebrew and other lan-
terms-and then transfer. guages in honor of Jewish Book
The question of handling the month is on display through Dec.
maximum of 50 transfers will be 8th in the Rare Book Room of
then, according to the report, the General Library.
placed in the hands of the Uni- The exhibit includes examples
versity and WSU. of the Hebrew Bible in manu-
Dean William N. Hubbard of scripts from the 10th century to
the medical school last year an- modern times. Facsimile editions
nounced accord on the "coopera- of illuminated manuscripts of the
tive plan" whereby a joint com- Hagadah are also shown.

mittee will work out the admis-
sion, curriculum and staffing
problems that these students will
pose.
e The 75 new WSU students plus'
the 50 new MSU enrollees in 1968
t stil would leave 50 places to be
- provided by 1971 to meet the 175
- increase goal. Where to place
8 these students would be left up
a to a new study committee, the
report explains.-
romptlyY
Building
SVITHA'S
entury drama)
and
ANDER'S
FROM SAMOS
ent of Speech
oratory Theatre
rssion Free
PROFESSIO
he MONTH
RI BERS

WOW! Where do I start? An abundance of
choice often prompts this remark by new-
comers who are amazed at our variety of
selection. If you are looking for a gift .

G. MICHIGAN

HELLD OVER!
THROUGH SATURDAY
Broadway's Comedy Smash
Even Funnier on the Screen

-.mom., ) 9maj
MUSIC SHOP'

DIAL 5-6290
~ ~r S f/ NDpSE9~
1rwE HERPS1IEhMINME ",.
COLOR BY DEL 'E QNEMASCOPE .
STARTING SUNDAY
iN YUMMY COLOR
DIAL 8-6416
STARTING
" TODAY

YOU.
7 E. Liberty
NO 2-0675

411
Ph.

I

VULCANS HONORARY
FOR THE SPRING SEMESTER
IS NOW OFFERING A $200 SCHOLARSHIP
ALL SOPHS, JRS., OR SRS. With a
2.5 AVERAGE OR BETTER ARE ELIGIBLE
AWARDS WILL BE BASED ON ACADEMIC RECORD,
NEED, AND ACTIVITIES.
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE 2011 S.A.B.

Key Priority
The University has listed
medical unit as one of its

th
ke

Mikado'

.

FREE
JAZZ and CIDERM
featuring the 20-piece
U of M JAZZ BAND
Directed by: BRUCE FISHER
Vocalist: SHEILAH BERNSTEIN
SATURDAY, NOV. 23
Immediately after the Ohio State Game
in the Michigan Union Lobby
Sponsored by the Michigan Union

LEAD ROLE-Delores Noeske
'66SM, plays Yum-Yum in the
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
production of the "Mikado" at
8 p.m. today in Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre. Additional per
formances will be given at 8
p.m. Friday and Saturday and
at 2p.m. on Saturday.

The Cercle francais has the honor
to present, in French:
THE LESSON (a comic drama)
of EUGENE IONESCO
FRIDAY NOV. 22 8:00
SATURDAY NOV. 23 8:00
SUNDAY NOV. 24 2:30
at 2065 Frieze Building
The characters are:
The Professor .............CARL MAIER
The Pupil....... .C.CAROL KORBELAK
The Maid....... MARY ANN KINGSTON
Tickets, on sale now first floor Frieze Bldg.
and if still remaining, at the door. 50c

TODAY:

4:10 p.m. P

_,J i t

.mmomo.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY┬░
Presents
TONIGHT v
THURSDAY, NOV. 21, 8:00 P.M.
I SATURDAY MATINEE, NOV. 23, 2:00 P.M.

Arena Theatre, FriezeI
H RO
CALLc
(a tenth o

MEN
THE GIRL F

Departm
Student Lab
Admi

)NAL THEATRE PROGRAM

nw

PLAY of t
SUBSC

present
A P A
in
THE

. 11

I? 71 - ..- .

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan