100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 20, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29. I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 20. 1~

i, -- f 1.1 LLLf1Y -% LvvV p

w

Jtah State Leads Nation
n Total Yardage Gained

,I,>

By The Associated Press

Such traditional football rival-
ries as Army-Navy, Oregon-Ore-
gon State, Utah-Utah State and
Oklahoma - Nebraska will have
more at stake than victory, na-
tional attention and area pride in
the next two weeks.
National championships in total
offense, rushing and scoring will
hang in the balance.
Latest NCAA statistics show
Utah State holding a one-point
edge over Navy in scoring, both
with a game remaining. The
Utags have scored 294 points in
nine games to the Middies' 293
in the same number. They are
the only major college teams
which have averaged better than
30 points a game.
Utah State also is the total
offense leader, averaging 402 yards
each game. Utah State takes on
Utah this Saturday, and the
Army-Navy game is Nov. 30.
Oklahoma and Nebraska will be

Statistics
TOTAL OFFENSE
G Plays Yds.

1. Utah State
2. Wichita
3. Ariz. State
4. Nebraska
5. Navy
6. Pittsburgh
7. Cincinnati
8. Oregon
9. Baylor
10. Air Force

9
8
8
9
9
8
9
9
8
9

604
504
500
606
606
539
569
560
553
584

3,618
3,075
2,914
3,222
3,221
2,853
3,180
3,157
2,785
3,067

Avg.
402.0
384.4
364.3
358.0
357 9
356.6
353.3
350.8
348.1
340.8
Avg.
270.2
253.9
252.3
249.0
247.8
233.7
253.6
231.6
229.8
225.4

fighting it out for the Big Eight
Conference championship Satur-
day, and the national rushing title
also will be at stake in this one.
Nebraska and Oklahoma are
running 1-2, with the Cornhuskers
leading the Sooners by 16:3 yards
a game, 270.2 to 253.9. It will be
Nebraska's finale but Oklahoma
will have one more game, against
Oklahoma State the following
week.
Oregon State leads the nation
in touchdown passes with 17 and
Oregon is third with 15, one less
than Mississippi. The Oregon
teams play Saturday at Eugene.
Baylor is the forward passing
leader, with second-place Tulsa
less than a yard behind. Each
team has two games remaining.
NVCAA Ban
On Hoosiers
MIay -Be Lifted
INDIANAPOLIS W) - The pos-
sibility that Indiana's powerful
swimming team may be permitted
to compete in the National colle-
giate meet in March, after being
barred for three years, was raised
Tuesday by Walter flyers, NCAA
executive director.
Byers said the matter of Indi-
ana's four-year suspension by
the NCAA, which is due to end
next April 28, likely will be taken
up at the NCAA Council meeting
in January.
Indiana. has dominated colle-
giate swimming in recent years
without being able to prove it
with NCAA trophies. Under colors
of the Indianapolis Athletic Club,
it has won the AAU outdoor team
championship seven straight years.
Indiana was barred from post-
season competition and special
events for four years in April of
1960 on charges of illegal recruit-
ing of football players. It was
charged some illegal offers to
prospective students were made
while Indiana already was under
one-year probation in 1958.
The six cases cited by the NCAA
covered excessive offers of aid
from alumni, including bonuses
up to $800.
Indiana's four-year suspension
did not prevent its athletes from
trying out for the 1960 Olympic
team and its swimmers brought
home three gold medals from
Rome.

HIG TEN PRACTICE:
'Stop Lewis'
Says Illinois
Coach Elliott
By The Associated Press
CHAMPAIGN-Illinois halfback
Wayne Strauch was the No. 1 tar-
get in yesterday's football practice
sessions as the Illini concentrated
on him in the role of Michigan
State's Sherman Lewis.
Strauch, a sophomore, and his
mates repeatedly ran through
MSU formations from the basic T.
"MSU's Sherm Lewis certainly
has proven to be one of the na-
tion's great backs," Illini Coach
Pete Elliott told Chicago football
writers by phone from Champaign,
Ill.
"He is the greatest threat to go
all the way that has been in the
conference in years. But Lewis has
been helped by the Spartans' good
balance. At the other half is Dew-
ey Lincoln, who also is a speed-
ster. At fullback is Roger Lopes,
who can go inside or outside and
is one of the finest fullbacks in
the Big Ten.
"They have two quarterbacks,
Dave McCormick and Dick Proeb-
stle, who get the job done and
pose the threat of passing.
"We can't permit our defenses
to play too much at Lewis, or
the others will get loose. We
would be glad to force Michigan
State to do more passing - but
that would take a lot of doing."
Illini tackles Archie Sutton and
Brian Duniec both showed excel-
lent progress from ankle sprains
suffered against Wisconsin.
* * *
Spartans Prepare
EAST LANSING-Defense and
more defense was stressed at the
Michigan State football workout
last night.
"Defense was our strong point
last week," said Coach Duffy
Daugherty as he prepared his
team to meet Illinois Saturday for
a game that will decide Big Ten
and Rose Bowl honors. "I'm be-
coming more and more aware of
the importance of defense."
There were several times,
Daugherty said, that MSU could
have lost to Notre Dame in the
game won 12-7 if it had not been
for the defense.
Daugherty scheduled a typical
Tuesday workout with 35-minutes
each of offense and defense and
then a rehearsal of defensive
plays.
"Everybody is getting Rose Bowl
hysteria," said Daugherty. "They
are way up on cloud 16 and
dreaming."

By LLOYD GRAFF
"The higher up you go, the more
your rear end is exposed."
So gymnastics coach Newt Lo-
ken capsuled his outlook for the
coming season. His charges are
defending NCAA champions and
have won the Big. Ten title for
three consecutive years. The avow-
ed aim of Loken and the team is
"number four in '64."
But if Loken is going to satisfy
his ambitions he will have to find
able replacements for two solid
gymnasts and a magnificent one
who exhausted their eligibility.
The able ones gone are Jim Hynds
who gathered points in several
events and Barry Spicer, who
turned in excellent work in floor
exercise.
Larose Gone
Of course, the superb all-around
performer, ex-captain Gill Larose
is also gone. Larose was perhaps
Michigan's greatest gymnast ever
-and proved himself to be the
finestin college last year as he
won first places in two events,
high bar andvaulting, and also
winning the all-around competi-
tion in the NCAA championship.
Larose scored points in all events
except trampoline and tumbling.
He won the Big Ten all-around
too.
But even with the substantial
losses the team has incurred Lo-
ken is not spotting his trampoline
with tears. He has confidence his

Gymnasts Aim for Fourth Straight Title

mats are well manned. And well
he might.
Lascari Captain
His new captain is Arno Las-
cari, a senior from Sacramento,
California, who, though a superb
gymnast in his own right, operat-
ed slightly in the shadow of La-
rose last year. "We expect Lascari
to win as many points as Larose
did last year and perhaps more,"
remarked Loken.
This projection is not surprising
in that Lascari got almost as many
points as Larose last year and
this year he will not have to com-
pete against him. In fact, in the
Big Ten meet both won three
events although Larose picked up
more points in other events to
win the all-around.
Loken is hoping that the many-
skilled Lascari will sharpen his
work on the rings and move up in
the all-around. The parallel bars
and the high bar rank as his
specialties.
Lascari will not be up to norm
for perhaps a month because he
sustained an injured wrist in prac-
tice a week ago when he fell off
the parallel bars. This will mean
that he will probably miss the
Midwest Open but should be in
fairly good form by the Big Ten
season.
Power in Depth
Michigan's power lies in its
depth of personnel in each of the
various gymnastics events, each
a unique test of balance, strength
and stamina. "
Take tumbling for instance.
Michigan's crew of jumping jacks
is headed by Phil Bolton and Mike
Henderson. "Henderson is looking
very good right now and Bolton
is looking better after recovering
from a bout with mono," said
Loken.
Bolton finished second in the
Big Ten behind the invincible Hal
Holmes of Illinois last season, but
Holmes has graduated leaving
tumbling up in the air.
John Hamilton also works on
the mats as well as the tramp
and in floor ex. Floor ex is his
forte as he took the Big Ten and
NCAA titles last year. Loken said
he was looking "very fine in prac-
tice." Dave Brod completes the
tumbling aggregation.
Safe in Trampoline.
In the trampoline Michigan is
about as safe as Sonny Liston at
a sewing circle. Gary Erwin and
Fred Sanders are almost sure bets
to take first and second in the
event. Sanders won first in the
Big Ten and Erwin took top spot
in the NCAA last year. This was
the pattern of the entire season.

On the sidehorse Loken will be The team will have a good stock
using Paul Levy along with Las- of newcomers to supplement the
cari. Levy finished fourth in the returnees. Alex Frecska, although
Big Ten and is aiming to lift his a junior, will get an opportunity
status this year. to make a second debut. Last year

he injured his wrist early in the
season and Loken kept him out
for almost its entirety.
"Frecska is in excellent shape
now. He should give us some more
strength in the all-around events
and be a strong backup for Las-
cari," said Loken.
One sophomore who should def-
initely add points is Rich Blanton
of Denver, Colorado. "Blanton will
help us in the rings, parallel bars
and floor ex," he went on "and
other sophomores like Ned Duke,
Don Fillip, John Cashman and
Dave Brod will all make a con-
tribution to the team."
Prepare for First Meet
The members of the squad have
been practicing since school be-
the Midwest Open in Chicago on
gan, honing up for the first meet,
Dec. 6-7. The best teams in the
country will be represented at that
meet.
It will be a good indication of
what is in store later on. Loken
envisions Iowa, Michigan State
and Minnesota as his principal
competitors in the conference with
Southern Illinois, California and
Southern Cal plus the Big Ten
schools as those posing the big-
gest threat to Michigan's repeat-
ing in the NCAA.

-Daily-Jim Lines
EASY DOES IT-Gymnast Alex Frecska handles himself with
ease on the side horse. Fresca, a junior, will try to aid in Michi-
gan's quest for its fourth consecutive NCAA gymnastics cham-
pionship. He was unable to compete last year because he broke
his wrist early in the season.

4

AP PICKS MSU STAR:
Lewis Given Top Back Award
41

RUSHING
G Rushes Yds.

1. Nebraska
2. Oklahoma
3. Princeton
4. Kansas
5. Army
6. Air Force
7. Texas
S. Ariz. State
9. Cincinnati
10. Syracuse
PA
1. Baylor
2. Tulsa
3. Miami, Fla.
4. San Jose
5. Utah State
6. Oregon
7. Wichita
9. Navy
S. Mississippi
10. Wisconsin

9
8
8
9
9
9
9
8
9
9

501
462
447
463
504
535
535
351
431
435-

2,432
2,031
2,018
2,251
2,230
2,103
2,102
1,853
2,068
2,029

ASSING
Att. Com.

Pet. Yds. PerI

266
273
204
230
218
186
157
174
174
205

145
151
105
125
119
100
87
114
95
104

54.5
55.3
51.5
54.3
54.6
53.8
55.4
65.5
54.6
50.7

Game
232.8
232.1
185.0
181.8
181.0
178.0
176.3
175.0
175.4
168.9

By The Associated Press
When you've got Michigan State
backed up against their own goal
line, watch out.
Notre- Dame penned the Spar-
tans on their 15-yard line in the
fourth quarter Saturday, and a
7-6 Irish lead was looking good.
Then Sherman Lewis, only 152
pounds, burst all the way for the
touchdown that gave Michigan
State a 12-7 victory.
It was the fifth time this year
that Sherman had gone more than
80 yards, and the run earned the
senior co-captain of the Spartans
Back of the -Week honor in the
Associated Press survey.
Lewis Scores Twice
Lewis, who comes from Louis-
ville, Ky., also scored the first
Michigan State touchdown. He
was the leading rusher for the
Spartans with 138 yards and play-
ed on defense most of the same.
"I don't see how any one man
could be any more valuable to any
team than Lewis has been to us,"
said Coach Duffy Daugherty after
the game.
It was a good Saturday for run-
ning backs, elsewhere. Junior full-
back Brian Piccolo of Wake For-
est led his team to a 20-19 victory
over South Carolina, breaking the
nation's longest major college los-
ing streak at 18. Piccolo gained
140 yards in 21 rushes and start-

ed the comeback from a 19-7
deficit with a 16-yard touchdown
run. Then he kicked the game-
winning extra point.
Martha Rambles
Paul Martha, Pitt's left half-
back, scored on a long run for the
second week in a row to start the
victory over Army. He had 103
yards on six carries.
Fullback Steve Murphy gained
103 yards for Northwestern, more
than the entire Ohio State team
and had two touchdowns.
Sophomore halfback L a r r y
Shields scored both touchdowns
for Oklahoma against Missouri,
one on a blistering punt return,
and made two important pass in-
terceptions.
Two quarterbacks, Terry Isaac-1
son of Air Force and Archie Rob-
erts of Columbia, were outstand-
ing. Isaacson scored twice, set up
three other touchdowns and a
field goal and punted for a 50-!
yard average against New Mexico.
Roberts passed for three touch-
downs and ran for a fourth
against Penn.
Timberlake Mentioned
Other nominees: Billy Ezell of
Louisiana State; Tom Blanch-
field of California; John Torok of
Arizona State; Bob Timberlake of
MICHIGAN; Sonny Fisher of
Mississippi State; Jack McLean of
Dartmouth; Armand Baughman

ARNO LASCARI
... top performer

seems to be running out.
/ Data-Guides pare down the subject
to the important core facts. They con-
centrate your final studying efforts.
You'll review faster, with less strain
-and remember more!
I Data-Guides present these facts
on permanent, single sheet loose-leaf
charts (81"x 11"). No hunting through
pages- on Data-Guides, your eyes can
sweep in whole chunks of information,
and re-scan again and again until the
facts are fixed in your mind.
# Data-Guides organize the facts for
you. You know what is important. You
learn and review in a systematic man-
ner, as numbers, letters, colors and
differing type faces lead you through
the subject.
J There are Data-Guides in every sub-
ject - Math, Science, Business, Lan-
guages, History, English ...
LEARN THE FACTS ON DATA-GUIDES
AND YOU WILL DO BETTER!
IMPORTANT NOTE: After this term's
notes and texts are gone, your perma-
nent Data-Guide summaries are the
keys to higher grades next term!
At book stores. Only 79 each.

what's a Shirt?
1 ~ i I 11
fl
+ J
To Gant, it's more than fabric; it's flair, fit, show-3 vital inherents, visile
only when a shirt is worn. Gant is finicky about shirts-fit and roll of collar,
proper amount of "show" when jacket is worn. Gant is finicky about drape,
fold, trim: all must"homogenize" to achieve flair-that viable ingredient
which gives the wearer comfort and aplomb.
Been taking your shirts fo r g ranted? Many men do. Try Gant; we think
they'll be a tradition with you. At discerning stores.
~ rn

COLLEGE GRADUATES-
TRAINING PROGRAMS LEADING TO
INTERESTING CAREER POSITIONS
OFFERED BY
THE STATE OF MICHIGAN
STARTING ANNUAL SALARIES-
$5,804.64 and $6,117.84

of Kansas; Fred Duda of Nebras-
ka; Rick Norton of Kentucky;
Tom Stockton of Texas; Kent Nix
of Texas Christian; Larry Jerni-
gan of Southern Methodist; Jim
Keller of Texas A&M; Gene Flem-
ing of Rice and Fred Marshall of
Arkansas.
Lineman
Of the Week
Denby Blackwell of Kansas
State, an ex-halfback playing for
an also-ran,was named Lineman
of the Week by the Associated
Press yesterday for his key per-
formance in a streak-ending vic-
tory.
The rangy end did a vital two-
way job as the Wildcats upset
Iowa State 21-10 Saturday, snap-
ping a string of 26 straight losses
in the Big Eight Conference dat-
ing back to 1960.
Blackwell a 6-foot-2 183-
pound mathematics major from
St. Louis, caught a fourt-quarter
pass on a 25-yard play that set up
K-State's clinching touchdown.
Later, he intercepted a pass and
returned it 39 yards to the nine,
setting up an insurance touch-
down.
SMU Man Listed
Blackwell's closest competitor
was Southern Methodist's John
Hughes, an earlier AP Lineman of
the Week this year. The Mustang
guard's clutch defensive work led
SMU to a 14-7 victory over Arkan-
sas. On a goal line stand that
stopped Arkansas on the SMU
three Hughes made two tackles
and batted down a fourth-down
pass in the end zone.
Then in the fourth quarter, on
a fourth-down-and-two situation
on SMU's 10, Hughes brought
down the ball carrier a yard short
of the first down.
Iowa End Standout
Guards Eddie McQuarters of
Oklahoma and Bruce MacDonald
of California and end Ivory Mc-
Dowell of Iowa were among other
line standouts.
McQuarters excelled at pass
rushing and also as a blocker as
the Sooners trimmed Missouri 13-
3. MacDonald led California's of-
fensive charge, made several key
tackles and recovered an enemy
fumble in the Bears' 35-22 victory
against Utah.
McDowell nailed Michigan run-
ners in the open field twice, avert-
ing apparently sure touchdowns,
and recovered a fumble on his own
two in helping Iowa tie the Wol-
verines 21-21.
Butkus Mentioned
Other nominees - ends Jerry
Kelley of Rice, Billy Truax of
Louisiana State, Jim Ingram of
Baylor and George Norman of
Cornell; tackles Brian Schweda
of Kansas, Dennis Wipfrey of
Kansas State and Gerry Philbin
of Buffalo; guards Jeff Ware of
Pitt, Bob Brown of Nebraska,
Olen Underwood of Texas, Ronnie
Moore of Texas A&M, Steve Gar-
mon of Texas Christian and Jus-
tin Canale of Mississippi State;
centers Dick Butkus of Illinois,
Chris Stetzar of Arizona State
and Ronnie Caveness of Arkansas.
SSCOBESj

AREAS:

Administrative Analysis
Agricultural
Budgetary Control
Chemistry
Economic Research
Employment Counseling
Forestry
Game and Fish Biology
Geology
Highway Planning
Institutional
Management
Insurance Examining'

Land Appraisal
Library Science
Mathematics
Parole and Probation
Personnel Methods
Personnel Technical
Processing
Physics
Property Appraising
Psychology
Purchasing
Right of Way Buying
Vocational Rehabilitation

I

Michigan Civil Service is now recruiting applicants for
its current examination program. Trainee ;positions in-
volving on-the-job development programs will be filled
from this examination. Variations in majors required
according to class.
Write to the MICHIGAN CIVIL SERVICE COMMIS-
SION, LANSING, MICHIGAN, 48913, for examination
applications. An equal opportunity employer.
BENEFITS AVAILABLE TO
STATE OF MICHIGAN EMPLOYEES:
Pay rates well in line with those of other employers
Regular salary increases
Transfer and promotional opportunities
State contributory group health and life insurance pro-
grams-State pays major share

ri

i

'i

NBA
Cincinnati 127, Detroit 102
Boston 12ยข, New York 98
San Francisco 129, St. Louis 96
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Greenville 67, Drury 57
So. State 71, E. Texas Baptist 62
Arkansas State 90, Lambuth 68
Indiana Tech 122, Spring Arbor 95
COLLEGE SOCCER
Penn State 4, Pittsburgh 2

"i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan