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November 19, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-19

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1963

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAQE TWO THE MICHTCU~N flAILY TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 19. 1O~2
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CONSERVATIVISM:
Stanlis Discusses
Burle's Philosophy

H ABER VIEWS FUTURE:
Scholler Views German Songs
- 1

I T

By JOHN WEILER
"Man is a political and social
animal," Prof. Peter J. Stanlis of
the University of Detroit and edi-
tor of "The Burke Newsletter,"
said Saturday in summing up
Edmund Burke's philosophy.
Prof. Stanlis, speaking before
the All-College Conservative Con-
ference held here last weekend,
said that Burke had a complex
though unsystematic philosophy to
explain all the problems of state.
There are, Prof. Stanlis noted,
seven elements in Burke's philos-
ophy: the definition of the royal
limits; the expansion of the leg-
islative sovereignty of the House
of Commons in opposition to the
king; the beginnings of political
parties; the way to maintain Brit-
ish sovereignty and extend civil
liberties; the extension of the
rights and provisions of the British
constitution to all British sub-
jects; the combination of ethical
and legal norms with - prudence
in practical politics; and the de-
fense of the historical order of Eu-
Panhel Alters
Rules on Vote,
For Officers
The Panhellenic Association
Presidents' Council recently voted
unanimously to change procedure
in its officer elections.
Elections will now be condensed
into a two-week period, and an
opening mass meeting will be held
in place of chapter meetings. At
the mass meeting the philosophy
and spirit of Panhel will be ex-
plained and questions will be an-
swered.
A further change is the insti-
tution of district meetings where
all candidates will speak. The sor-
orities will be divided into four
districts in order to create an at-
mosphere for both candidates and
audience more relaxed than has
been possible at the traditional
mass meeting.
In further action, the council
gave permission to .all houses to
bring in members from chapters
on other campuses to help with
rush, if such help is needed.
Also approved was the decision
to allow Junior women transfer-
ring to the University in January
to rush if they so desire.

rope against those who would de-
stroy it.
Non-Revolutionary
Prof. Stanlis stressed that
Burke's philosophy is one of grad-
ual rather than revolutionary
change. His philosophy noted that
the American and English Revo-
lutions were of the former type,
while the French Revolution was
one of abrupt change.
"Burke's philosophy emphasized,
what men have in common," Prof.
Stanlis commented. His concept of
the social contract is continuous
and includes all generations of'
men: the living, the dead, and
the still to be born.
Burke's concept of political sov-
ereignty stressed "the corporate
nature of man," Prof. Stanlis said.
"Man was born into society, and
this society does not mean only
the counting of heads."
For example, the idea of civil
liberties is corporate in nature.
Man is not isolated and does not
have the same freedoms as if he
were isolated.
Concept of State
Burke's concepts of the state in-
cluded a three part, balanced divi-
sion of the state because Burke
believed in moderation of power,
Prof. Stanlis said.
Burke's philosophy also includes
natural law, prudence and posi-
tiveness, Prof. Stanlis commented.
Natural law stated that constitu-
tional and ethical norms govern
society-the popular ideas and the
constitutional ideas are not relat-
ed here.
Prudence said that man would
accept his inheritance, which is
his past history, and work from
there. "What man is born into is
not changed rapidly," Prof. Stan-
lis said.
"It is not an abruupt change
such as in the Congo when one
united government was substitut-
ed for all the local tribal autono-
mies. Prudence also does away
with the idea of a perfect society,
since man can start only from
where history left off."
Three Revolutions
Prof. Stanlis noted that Burke
wrote major works on three dif-
ferent revolutions: the English
Revolution of 1688, the American
Revolution of 1775, and the
Franch Revolution of 1789.
The revival of Burke's writings
which has come about in the last
few years is due to the release of
many of his manuscripts, Prof.
Stanlis said.

-Daily-Jeffrey Chase
MEDIEVAL MUSIC-During the middle ages in Germany, groups
such as the one pictured above formed part of the musical life
of the period. Among the instruments pictured above are the
krummhorn the lute, and the recorder.
Across Campus 1

Swainson . .
Former Gov. John B. Swainson
will speak on "The Relationships
of Political Leaders to Career Gov-
ernment Employes" at 8 p.m. to-
day in Rackham Lecture Hall. The
talk will be part of an Institute
of Public Administration Social
Seminar.
Romanticism . .
Visiting Prof. Wolfgang Stech-
ow of the history of art depart-
ment will speak on "The Image
of Winter in German Romanti-
cism" at 4:10 p.m. today in Aud. B.
Glee Club
The University Men's Glee Club
will present a joint Michigan-
Ohio State Glee Club concert at
7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. on Saturday,
Nov. 23.
Tickets are on sale from 8 a.m.-
5 p.m. at the Hill Aud. ticket of-
fice.
Dance .. .
The University Concert Dance
Organization will present an in-
formal evening of dance perform-
ances at 8 p.m. today in Barbour
Gymnasium. The program was
choreographed and will be danced
by students. A short, film, "The
Seven Last Words" will be shown
at the end of the performance.
Cosmogony .. .
Prof. W. G. Lambert of Johns
Hopkins University will speak on
"Greek and Babylonian Cosmog-
ony" at 4:10 p.m. today in Aud. C.
Germany . .
The International Students As-
sociation will present a lecture
and discussion on "Cultural Values
in Present-Day Germany at 4 p.m.
today in the Multipurpose Rm. of
the UGLI.
Housing...
A conference on problems faced
by persons renting off-campus
housing to students will be held at
8 p.m. today in Rm. D-528 of the
SAB.
Speaking at the conference will
be John Bingley, director of stu-
dent activities and organizations;
Elizabeth Leslie, Bingley's associ-
ate; Norma F. Kraker, supervisor
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

of the off-campus housing bureau'
of the Office of Student Affairs;
Prof. William Joy, director of en-
vironmental health for Health
Service; and Kathleen M. Mead
of the International Center.
Alactones ...,I
Prof. H. Muxfeldt of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin will speak on
"A New Reaction of Azlactones
and Its Application to Natural
Product Syntheses" at 4 p.m. to-
day in Rm. 1400 of the Chemistry
Bldg. This will be the second talk
given during the 1963 series of
Werner E. Bachmann Memorial
Lectures.
The Lower Depths....
Prof. Kenneth Rowe of the Eng-
lish department will present an
interpretation of Maxim Gorky's
"The Lower Depths" at 4:15 p.m.
today at Pi Beta Phi sorority.
The lecture is the second in a
series sponsored by Panhellenic's
Scholarship Committee.
Barnett Warns
Of 'Tyranny'
In Rights Bills
(Continued from Page 1)

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
"Minnelieder are German me-
dieval songs of spiritualized court-
ly love sung by the Minnesinger,
a poet-musician of noble rank, to
a lady member of the nobility,"
Prof. Harald Scholler of the Ger-
man department states.
"The music is sober and closely
akin to the ecclesiastical scalar
modes; the rhythm is generally
slow and duple in meter. The texts
frequently fall into two categories
-those describing the freshness
and rebirth of the spring season
and the dawn song (Tagelied) or
wachter's song (Wachterlied) in
which a faithful friend keeps a
look out to warn the lovers of the
approach of dawn, when their
night of love must end," Prof.
Scholler continued.
Prof. Scholler explains that to-
night at 8 p.m. in the Multipur-
pose Rm. of the UGLI he and 10
musicians and singers will pre-
sent a lecture recital of German
literature and music of the Middle
Ages,
Medieval Poet
The offering includes discus-
sion and performance of exam-
ples from the output of Walther
von der Vogelweide, the most fa-
mous of the medieval German
poets, of the German epics, using
Das Nibelungenlied as an example,
and of poems and songs depicting
nature and country life, by assort-
ed poets, including Oswald von
Wolkenstein, who, considers him-
self to be the last of the Minne-
singers.
"It is interesting to note that
Das Nib'elungenlied is not Rich-
ard Wagner's source for his late
nineteenth century operatic cycle.
Medieval Epic
He used mainly Scandinavian
medieval epics and sagas. Das
Nibelungenlied tells about no
dwarfs, giants, or gods; it is based
upon historical facts from the
period of the great European mi-
grations of the early fifth cen-
tury," Prof. Scholler points out.
He explains that the musical
instruments used are as close to
the medieval types as possible.
They include the krummhorn, a
double reed relative of the bagpipe
which is named for its character-
istic curved shape; the lute, a
stringed instrument with a body
in the shape of a halved pear and
a flat neck with seven or more
frets; and the recorder, an end
blown flute with a soft and slight-
ly reedy tone.
The lieder tradition extended
into the nineteenth and twentieth
centuries, with composers such as
Schubert, Brahms, Schumann and
Mahler being notable contributers
to this form of composition.
Let us style a
COLLEGIATE CUT
Becoming to you .!!
NO WAITING
7 ARTISTS
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theater

about six years "intellectual capi- aces entered Michigan colleges in
tal" and its value will begin to 1963. Next year the number will
decline unless the learning proc- increase to 50,000 and the year
ess is continuous. In physics the after that it is estimated that
period is eight years and in en- over 60,000 will enter Michigan
gineering about ten, Dean Haber colleges and universities.
said. He therefore re-emphasized Tragedy
the importance of continuous ed- "The unfortunate tragedy is that
ucation. we knew for many years this
An automation expert classified bulge in higher education was
all jobs into three categories: coming. We just couldn't convince
dead-end jobs, status quo jobs, people a change was necessary."
and bright future jobs, Dean Ha- "ee changes nechnsloy.
ber said..These changes in technology
There are thirty million people impose a larger obligation for some
in dead-end jobs now, he noted. general education. For only as
If technology continues to advance this is secured will students be
their jobs will become obsolete. able to adjust and adapt to the
These are people who will have to changes which lie ahead," he said.
be rerouted through education be- The President's Club, to which
fore they rejoin the ranks of the Dean Haber spoke,ifan rg^fi.af

i
4
7

DVEAN WILLIAM HABER
... changes .

By BARBARA SEYFRIED
"We live in the age of change
and, because we do, it is naive to
imply that the University can es-
cape change," Dean William Ha-
ber of the literary college said to
the President's Club yesterday.
"We spend 18 billion dollars a
year in research and development
of our nation's 'industry of discov-
ery' to make today's materials
and methods obsolete tomorrow,"
he continued.
The consequences of this re-
search have been an "explosion
of knowledge" so large that the
real challenge today is how to
use it.
It has been estimated that a
PhD in mathematics represents

employed.
Dropouts -
Adding to the unemployment
problem is the number of drop-
outs in high school. The United
States already has three million
people in the American labor force
who have not gone beyond the
fifth grade and five million peo-
ple will join the labor force by
1968 and who will not have grad-
uated from high school, he said.
"It is increasingly difficult to
get any kind of a job without a
high school diploma. Most em-
ployers feel that as the age of
automation progresses the basic
educational background that is ac-
quired in high school is absolute-
ly essential to handling any job,"
Dean Haber said.
Coupled with the increased drop-
out rate is an increase in the
number of students desiring en-
trance into college. In Michigan
alone, 40,000 high school gradu-

1

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A,

sum
TIT AT Qnnn

Fathers always make plans
for daughters and then
all of a sudden-like
THOSE PLANS BEGIN
TO TAKE SHAPE!

pion of alumni an trtiends o the
University who are interested in
higher education and have donat-
ed a minimum of $10,000 to the
University, or who will have don-
ated that much cumulatively at
the end of 10 years.
Kelley To Discuss
Rights Measure
State Atty. Gen. Frank J. Kel-
ley will discuss civil rights legis-
lation at a meeting sponsored by
the Ypsilanti Democratic Com-
mittee at 7:15 p.m. today in the
UAW Local 849 Hall, 454 Chidest-'
er, Ypsilanti.
UNIVERSITY
OF DETROIT
C0 N C E R T S
an evening of
Contemporary Humor
Jazz and Song
NEXT SATURDAY
November 23
8:30 UofD
Memorial Bldg.
The Dick
GREGORYI
SHOW
"A man of his time -aware, critical
and deeply committed. But most of
all, he's just plain funny."

I

DIAL 5-6290
PiJMeSWatrT/8NDSeE
1inE HEShEMINE
coLoR BY DEIJE CINEMAScCPE
with Robert Morley a Audrey Meadows
also Tom & Jerry Cartoon " News
NEXT: "UNDER THE YUM YUM TREE"

Count the Changes in the All-New
Here's a start! New sty/ing, new comfort,
new power. Want more? OK go ahead...
The MOB's got lots more! Even wind-up AlB
windows.

. .

A4

DIAL 8-6416
Ends Wednesday

I

ONE SHOW ONLY
TONIGHT AT 7:30

130fTMMSWE
A~~ut u NOLA 'AUARDINALE
NEXT: "THE CONJUGAL BED"

attack on the fundamental rights
of trespass and governmental
neutrality in civil actions,
For the sake of individual free-
doms, self-government and basic
constitutional laws, Barnett called
for a campaign "to get back to
the great and matchless funda-
mental principles which were so
graciously handed down to us by
the wise an dcourageous founders
of this government."
The Mississippi governor called
for a reversal of what he called
the trend toward centralized gov-
ernment in Washington.
"We must no longer remain idle
or complacent. The clarion call
must be sounded for the states to
come to their own defense and ob-
tain a restoration of constitution-
al government," Barnett declared.
He said the state rights issues
involve more than civil rights,
claiming that the federal govern-
ment is encroaching on water
rights in Western states.
Barnett declared that Mississip-
pians do not have the right to
say how to solve problems of the
other states, nor do other states
have a right to solve Mississippi's.
"We certain would not want to
be discourteous in projecting our
ignorance of conditions in other
states because we could not con-
tribute anything worthwhile to
their solution. All- the South asks
is the same simple courtesy from
those who are not familiar with
our problems," he said.
In the question and answer ses-
sion that followed the talk, Bar-
nett explained that most Negroes
did not vote because they "did not
put forth the effort."
He declared that "voting is not
an inherent right, but a privilege"
in Mississippi and cited several
provisions in the election laws.
"About half of the whites are in
the same fix," he added.

. Ount - em al a...!A BMCA.
4 Models in Stock
OVERSEAS IMPORTED CARS, Inc.
331 S. Fourth Ave.

F-

Small, but important
Works for the Christmas Season:
paintings, prints, ceramics sculptures
may be taken home at time of purchase

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial 1
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Adiinstration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19
Day Calendar
Dept. of Psychiatry Lecture-Selma
Kramer, M.D., President, Philadelphiaj
Psychoanalytic Institute, "Involvement
with Parents in Child Analytic and
Child Psychiatric Practice": Children's
Psychiatric Hospital Aud., 8 p.m.
Sigma Alpha Eta, National Society for
Speech Correction Majors: Regular
meeting today, 7:30 p.m. at Speech
Clinic. Mrs. Adler, Children's Psychia-
tric Hospital, will be the speaker.
Doctoral Examination for Leonard Jo-
seph Porcello, Electrical Engineering;
thesis: "An Experimental Study of Rap-
id Phase Fluctuations Induced Along
a Satellite-to-Earth Propagation Path"
today, 2323 E. Engrg., at 3 p.m. Chair-
man, L. J. Cutrona.
Doctoral Examination for Jacob Mil-
liken, Jr., Education; thesis: "Student
Achievement and Its Relationship to
(Continued on Page 6)
S1

VINCE GUARALDI
MARGIE MeWO
Jazz impressions by
the Guaraldi Trio,
and the unique
voice of Miss McCoy.
Our Next Show
THE COMMITTEE
Improvised wit from
San Francisco
Saturday, March 7
UNIVERSITY
OF DETROIT
CONCERTS

M

201 Nickels Arcade

Weekdays 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Saturdays 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY
THE presents0
O
OPENING WEDNESDAY
NOV. 20-8:00 P.M.
-,--lJ TIrCKETSA fit-9

i

fAre those groups ever terrific"
IMichigan and Ohio State Men's Glee Clubs
in Joint Concert
11;ith crnPrifl nr .ot: TUPF.ARBORS

DIAL 2-6264
I STARTING WEDNESDAY *
WHEELER DEALER METS SEX APPEAR!
UMaA M CTF M;

ii

11

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