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November 17, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-17

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2963 '

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17. 1963'

ARTS AND LETTERS:
'Prix' Frees Artist's

Time

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
"Time, not money or environ-
ment, is the valuable gift which
winning a Prix de Rome affords,"
Prof. Leslie Bassett of the music
school said recently.
Bassett, a Prix de Rome winner
who recently returned from a two-
year stay as a fellow at the
American Academy in Rome, ex-
plains that the German, French
and American academies each
grant one of these prizes annually
for musical composition; awards
in the other humanities are given
too.
The composition award entitles
its recipient to a studio, grand
piano, and plently of time to
create.
"This seemingly great quantity
of time with no deadlines and no
inspector is an overwhelming ex-
perience at first; it requires get-
ting used to," Bassett notes.
Rome Visit
"My studio was in an eighteenth
century setting on top of a hill
which afforded a view of all of
Rome. A glance out of the win-
dow presented a scene of sculp-
ture and fountains and formal
gardens with geometrically-shap-
ped evergreens," he recalls.
The recipient is expected to get
out and meet the Italian com-
posers and musicians, he explains.
Short trips to other parts of Eu-
rope are encouraged.
Bassett notes that Debussy and
Berlioz, two noted composers of
the last century, received a Prix
de Rome at the French Academy.
Contemporary American compos-
ers to receive this award include
Roger Sessions, Elliot Carter,
Samuel Barber, and Howard
Hanson.
Stanley Quartet
Next Wednesday the Stanley
Quartet, the official University
ensemble, will perform one of the
works Bassett wrote while in

Rome. The work, Quartet No. 3,
was composed in the summer of
1962 and had its world premiere
in May, 1963 at the American
Embassy Theater in Rome.
Bassett describes this four-
movement work: "It is a com-
panion piece to my Quintet for
piano and strings. Each utilizes
the same thematic and harmonic
material and turns of phrase, but
they use them differently. In the
quintet each instrument's part is
an entity distinct from the others,
but in the quartet, more unity

among the parts is attempted.
The idiom is chromatic and the
melodic lines are longer.
Third Movement
"The third movement is inter-
esting because in it I have used
a rustling effect and special bow-
ing techniques on the strings. The
fourth movement begins slowly,
but gradually increases in tempo
by a controlled accelerando."
The Stanley Quartet. celebrat-
ing its fifteenth anniversary this
year, gave this work its American
premiere on Nov. 5 in Detroit.

See No Large Changes
From Japan Elections

TODAY
2:30 p.m.-The New York City
Opera Company will present Puc-
cini's "Madama Butterfly" in Hill
Aud. The opera, to be sung in,
Italian, is the third presentation
of the University Musical Society's
Extra series.
3 p.m.-The Professional Pro-
gram wil present the Association
of Producing Artists in Pirandel-
lo's "Right You Are (If You Think
You Are)" in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.--The New York City,
Opera Company will present Mo-
zart's "Don Giovanni" at Hill Aud.
This is the sixth event in the
University Musical Society's Chor-
al Union series. The opera will be
sung in English.
MONDAY, NOV.18
4 p.m.-Prof. Albert Eschen-
moser, organic chemist at the
Swiss Federal Institute, will give
the first part of the annual Wer-
ner Bachmann Memorial Lecture
in Chemistry, in Rm. 1400 of the
Chemistry Bldg.
The lecture will be given in two
parts in conjunction with a Na-
tural Product Symposium. Lec-
tures at the symposium will deal
with various aspects of naturally-
occuring substances. There will be
a lecture at 4 p.m. Monday-Friday
in Rm. 1400.

By WILLIAM CUMMINGS
"There will be no substantial
change in the balance of power
in the Japanese Diet in the Nov.
21 general elections, Shigeo Kas-
hima predicts.
Kashima, on leave from Sankei,
the fourth largest daily newspaper
in Japan, pointed out that Prime
Minister Hayato Ikeda's Liberal-
Democratic Party has led Japan
through a continuing period of
prosperity. Rising prices of con-
sumer goods is the only aspect of
the domestic scene that the So-
cialist opposition will be able to
make into an issue.
Liberal-Democrats
The Liberal-Democratic Party
holds 286 of the 467 seats in the
Diet's lower house. "Many intel-
ligent people are concerned with
this absolute majority," Kashima
notes. "Some of these people may
vote Socialist to change the bal-
ance. But there are many diffi-
culties the Socialist Party must
overcome in order to gain a ma-

a --- I

Students-Faculty
call 662-8871
for C/nept a
Program Information

jority of representatives, one of
them being a lack of suitable
candidates," he adds.
A key phrase in the Socialist
platform in the 1960 election was
"American Imperialism." Kashima
pointed out that these words had
been eliminated and the Socialist
Party has moved further right in
its international policy.
Trade Unions
SOHYO (General Council of
Japanese Trade Unions), the larg-
est labor union in Japan, supplies
the Socialists with most of their
campaign funds and has influ-
enced this change, Kashima said.
"SOHYO recently decided that
Japan is a capitalistic country. It
now would like to have better re-
lations with European and Ame-
rican labor unions, in contrast
with SOHYO's former identifi-
cation with the labor movement
in the communist countries," he
comments.
Softened Stand
Despite its softened position on
"American Imperialism," the So-
cialist Party will continue to pro-
test American arms in Japan. The
Socialists have a pacifist policy
which opposes even the use of
forces for "self-defense." This
position conforms with the "Peace
Constitution" that General Mac-
Arthur helped the Japanese form
during the occupation period after
World War II.
The Socialist Party, with 137
seats, usually aligns with other
"progressive parties" in the Diet
voting. This bloc has increased its
share of popular votes from 24 to
40 per cent since 1953. Kashima
does not believe this figure will
change substantially.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Circle Recognition Society, Meeting,
Nov. 19, 7:30 p.m., League, Cave Room.
Cong. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, Sem-
nar: Interpretation of the Old Testa-
ment, Nov. 17, 7 p.m., 802 Monroe.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stud. Org.,
Supper at 6 p.m., 6:45 p.m. Internation-
a] Night; Panel: "Meaning of a Chris-
tian," Nov. 17, 1511 Washtenaw.
Graduate Outing Club, Hike, Nov. 17,
2 p.m., Rackham Bldg., Huron St.
Entrance.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tetulia, lunes,
Nov. 17, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Nov. 17, 7
p.m., Hill & S. Forest Ave. Speaker:
Lemar Miller, local leader of Congress
on Racial Equality.
Russian Club, Coffee, Conversation,
Nov. 18, 3-5 p.m., Faculty Lounge, 4th
Fl., FB.
k* it *

JOHN B. SWAINSON
. .. political leaders

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY
presents
0~ f
- NOV. 20 21 22, 23
O .. $1.00, $1.50, $2.00
Tickets on sale now
Lydia Mendelssohn: Nov. 18-19, 9-5
Nov. 20-23, 9-8
<2""">o"%=><""">o<"""yo<""""o<'""""oe"""Fo'""">o<-"><--"o<"ryo

4:10 p.m.-Robert Mandrou of
the Ecole des Hautes Etudes Poli-
tiques, Paris, will speak on "Cul-
ture Populaire et Culture Savante
en France aux 17 et 18 Siecles," in
French, in Aud. B.
4:15 p.m.-Dr. Lester J. Evans,
Executive Director of the New
York Committee on Medical Edu-
cation, will speak on "What Makes
Human Biology Human" in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall. This is the
third of the William W. Cook
Lectures on American Institutions.
TUESDAY, NOV. 19
4 p.m.-The International Stu-
dents Association will present a
lecture and discussion on "Cul-
tural Values in Present-Day Ger-
many" in the multipurpose room
of UGLI.
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Wolfgang Stec-
how of the history of art depart-
ment, will speak on "The Image
of Winter in German Romanti-
cism" in Aud. B.
4:10 p.m.-Prof. W. G. Lambert,
of Johns Hopkins University will
speak on "Greek and Babylonian
Cosmogony" in Aud. C.
8 p.m.-Former Gov. John B.
Swainson will speak on "The Re-
lationships of Political Leaders to
Career Government Employees" as
a part of an Institute of Public
Administration Social Seminar in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
8 p.m.-Prof. Selma Kramer of
Temple University, president of
the Philadelphia Psychoanalytic
Institute, will speak on "Involve-
ment with Parents in Child Ana-
lytic and Child Psychiatric Prac-
tice" at the Children's Psychiatric
Hospital Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Concert
Dance Organization will present
an informal evening of dance per-
formers at Barbour Gymnasium.
The program was choreographed
and will be danced by students. A

short film, "The Seven Last
Words" will be shown at the end'
of the performance.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 20
4 p.m.-Prof. James N. Catherr
of the zoology department will
speak on the "Development of the1
Molluscan Shell Gland" in Rm.
1210 of the Chemistry Bldg. {
4:15 p.m.-Dr. Lester J. Evans,
will speak on "Organization of4
Medical Care-The Health Team"'
as the fourth part of the William
W. Cook Lectures on American In-
stitutions in Rackham Lecturea
Hall.
8 p.m .-The B'nai Brith Hillel
Foundation will present Prof. Pres-
ton W. Slosson, formerly of the
University history department,1
speaking on "Israel: The West in
the East" in the Brasley Lounge
of the Hillel Foundation.
8 p.m.-The Gilbert and Sulli-
van Society will present "The Mi-
kado," their first production of
the year, at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The Stanley Quartet
will give the first Ann Arbor per-
formance of "Quartet No. 3" by
Prof. Leslie Bassett of the music
school in Rackham Aud.
Members of the Quartet are
Professors Gilbert Ross and Gus-
tave Rosseels, violins; Robert
Courte, viola; and Jerome Jelinek,
cello; all of the music school.
The program will also include
"Quartet in C-sharp minor, Op.
131,by Beethoven.
THURSDAY, NOV. 21
2:15 p.m.-Dr. Jacques S. Gott-
lieb of the Lafayette Clinic in De-
troit will speak on "Biological
Adaptation and Schizophrenia" in
the Main Conference Rm. of the
Mental Health Research Institute.
4:10 p.m.,The Student Labora-
tory Theatre will offer a double
bill as its fourth production of the
year, in the Arena Theatre of the
Frieze Bldg. To be presented are
"Callimachus" by Hrosvitha, a
tenth century Saxon nun, written
in the style of the Roman comic
playwright Terrence and "Girl
from Samos" by Menander.
4:30 p.m.-The International
Students Association will give a
tea at the International Center.
7:30 p.m.-Voice Political Party
will present a program of films
on civil liberties, in the Multi-
purpose Rm. of the UGLI. "The
Furrow-McCarthy Debates" and
"National Security vs. Individual
Rights" will be shown.
8 p.m.-The Gilbert and Sulli-
van Society will present "The Mi-
kado" at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The Professional
Theatre Program's Associationof
Producing Artists will give the
opening performance of Maxim
Gorky's "Lower Depths," in True-
blood Aud. This is the final play
to premiere in the Fall Festival.
FRIDAY, NOV. 22
4:15 p.m.-Dr. Lester J. Evans
will speak on "The Future of Uni-
versity Education for the Health
Professions" in the final lecture
of the William W. Cook Lectures
on American Institutions.
4:15p.m.-David Krantz of the
University of Pennsylvania will
speak on "The Representation of
the Effects of Adaption and Con-
trast on Perceived Color" in Aud.
A.
8 p.m.-The cercle francais will
present "The Lesson," a comic
drama by Eugene Ionesco in Rm.
2065 of the Frieze Bldg. The play
will be performed by students in
French.
8 p.m.-The Folklore Society
will present blues singer John
Hammond Jr. in the Michigan
Union Ballroom.
8 p.m.-The Gilbert and Sulli-
van Society will present "The Mi-
kado," in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The music school
will present a wind instrument

recital led by Prof. Louis Stout
of the music school and Glennis
Stout in Rackham Aud. Works by
Telemann, Bach and Beethoven
will be included in the program.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program's Association of
Producing Artists will present
Gorky's "Lower Depths" in True-
blood Aud.
SATURDAY, NOV. 23
2 p.m.-The Gilbert and Sulli-
van Society will present "The Mi-
kado" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
7 p.m. and 9 p.m.-The Univer-
sity Men's Glee Club will present
a joint Michigan-Ohio State Glee
Club Concert in Hill Aud.
8 p.m.-The Gilbert and Sulli-
van Society will present "The
Mikado" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8 p.m.-The cercle francais will
present Ionesco's "The Lesson," in
French in Rm. 2065 of th.e Frieze
Bldg.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program's Association of
Producing Artists will present
I

SUNDAY, NOV. 24
2:30 p.m.-The cercie francais
will present Ionesco's "The Les-
son" in French in Rm. 2065 of the
Frieze Bldg.
3 p.m.-The Professional Thea-
tre Program's Association of Pro-
ducing Artists will present Piran-
dello's "Right You Are (If You
Think You Are)" in Trueblood
Aud.
3 p.m.-The music school will
present a recital by the students
of the wind instrument depart-
ment in Lane Hall Aud. Works by
Palestr'ina, Mozar't-Mayeur, and
Guilmant will be included in the
program.
Tikofsky To Head
Aphasia Academy
Prof. Ronald Tikofsky. director
of the University Speech Clinic,
has been named chairman of the
Academy of Aphasia, a newly
formed group which will study
aphasia (language impairment)
and related disorders. The Acade-
my will draw experts from a varie-
ty of fields, ranging from pathol-
ogy to linguistics.

Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
Feature 15 Min. Later

*

Read and Use
Michigan Daily Classifieds

1

.0

t

Gorky's "The Lower Depths"
Trueblood Aud.

In

DEAL
5-6290
DEE~ I N

cE-EE
Fathers always make
plans for daughters
and then all of a
sudden-like
THOSE PLANS
BEGIN TO
TAKE SHAPE!
q
ME
FI NE
y U UL
' r',1 CYKStERE:NUCNAILYt ONNSOfl

I

i '

--also
CARTOON 0 NEWS

U

Unitarian Student Group,
7:30 p.m., Unitarian Church.
Father Burnett, "Unitarians+
a Catholic Priest."

Nov. 17,
Speaker:
Confront

Fiim1

ENDING TUESDAY
COMPLETE SHOWS AT
1:15-3:10-5:05
7:05 & 9:10

JEWISH BOOK
FAIR
at
UJLRICH'S
in co-operation with Hillel
NOV. 18-27

. . .... ... ... 7 711

I

MICHIGAN UNION CAFETERIA
Sunday Night's Featured Item
ROAST TURKEY & DRESSING
CRANBERRY SAUCE

Served in the
CENTER ROOM 5-7 P.M.

I

DIAL 8-6416

GOYRioS

of Mississippi
will speak in', Ann Arbor
on

-mm'wM.

Eisenstein's

;; :: .,. ;:, .area eauarere or tne.my .,:;;x::#

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