100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 15, 1963 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAnP

Fi DAY OEBR1,18sU ME!IA AL A~U

rriurA 4i

Land
Scholarships
By LAURA GODOFSKY
Collegiate Press Service1
CHICAGO - Sooner or later
V this country will have to have a
national scholarship program of a
scope so great that only the fed-
eral government can administer
it, predicted United States Com-
missioner of Education Francis
Keppel Tuesday.
The former Harvard dean sug-
gested the scholarship program
in an address before the Associa-
tion of State Universities and
Land Grant Colleges.
The program will be necessary,
he said, because even the "rela-
tively low cost" of state institu-
tions will soon be too great fcr a
large number of students. The
average $1,750 cost of attending
college in the United States is al-
ready too great for thousands of
students, Keppel said.
Pay, Brains'
Noting that intellectual ability
is not related to the ability to pay,
Keppel stressed the need for
equality of educational opportun-
ity. If we continue to sacrifice pe-
cunious students to national in-
difference, "our society will lose
many potential leaders," he
warned.
Increased federal activity in ur-
ban areas where income and as-
piration are low and more federal
financial support of "qualified but
financially distressed students"
were two of five "legislative tar-
gets" cited by Keppel as areas for
additional federal activity.

Grant Session Eyes Education

FRANCIS KEPPEL
.. . federal support
The other areas were the teach-
ing profession, university exten-
sion, and adult illiteracy. Keppel's
justification for further federal
educational involvement is the
current trend towards a "national
economy and culture."
Salary, Experience
Citing a recent study demon-
strating a high correlation be-
tween the salary and experience of
teachers and student achievement,
Keppel said that the federal gov-
ernment must and can make
teaching more financially reward-
ing. It would be far better to have
one person teach for thirty vears

at a high salary than have six in-
experienced persons each teach for
five years at lower salaries, he
said.
Teaching is the only profession
which puts a ceiling on the in-
come of those who have served
more than 10 or 15 years, Keppel
noted. This ceiling has limited the
teaching profession primarily to
women, who generally have less
financial responsibility to their
families than men.
Keppel proposed university ex-
tension and adult literacy pro-
grams as valuable means of al-
leviating unemployment. A sub-
stantial percentage o: the United
States unemployed labor force is
composed of skilled laborers who
have been trained for jobs which
are now obsolete and of function-
ally illiterate adults, he said.
'Seek Support
For Research
Collegiate Press Service
CHICAGO - Plans are being
made here to gain increased Con-
gressional support for educational
research in the coming year.
Professor Joseph V. Totaro of
the University of Wisconsin told
a division meeting of the Associa-
tion of State Universities and
Land-Grant Colleges that prog-
ress in Congress for educational
research and development pro-
grams was "substantial" as com-
pared to other college aid pro-
grams but that more money is
needed.
He blamed disunity among edu-
cators for the difficulty in con-
vincing Congress to provide more
funds for research in education
methods and development.

Public Image
Collegiate Press Service
News media rarely report and
never feature news of the import-
ant things a university does, Uni-
versity of New Mexico President
Tom Popejoy observed Monday.
Since news outlets are "con-
cerned mainly with controversies,
contests, and contentions," and
universities with research, teach-
ing, and scholarship, the two in-
terests rarely coincide in a front
page or prominent item, he said.
Popejoy discussed coverage of
universities in news media in a
speech before the Council of Pres-
idents of the Association of State
Universities and Land Grant Col-
leges.
More Controversy
Of the 149 front-page stories
about UNM that have appeared
during the past 21 months, 67 per
cent were based on controversy,
he said. Another 12 per cent dealt
with athletic contests.
"All other news stories about
the university, which were mainly
non-controversial and were most-
ly about the dynamics of teach-
ing and research, were buried
deeply in the papers," reported
Popejoy.
Reader Survey
New Mexico newspaper readers*
were surveyed on 20 university
names which had appeared at
least once on page one in the
past year.
"Bobby Santiago, an All-Amer-
ican halfback, was the best-
known by the public. Almost 90
per cent of the persons inter-
viewed knew that he was an out-
standing athlete," reported Pope-
joy.
The chairman of UNM's Board
of Regents "won the booby prize-
only six per cent of the readers

Groups Merger
By THOMAS DEVRIES
Collegiate Press Service
CHICAGO - Three of the ma-
jor national organizations in the
field of higher education an-
nounced their merger here Tues-
day.
They are the Association of
State Universities and Land-
Grant Colleges, the National As-
sociation of State Universities,
and the State Universities Asso-
ciation.

M. x£55565

Ism

The proposed name
group is the National
of State Universities
Grant Colleges.

of the new
Association
and Land-

TOM L. POPEJOY
...UNM survey
thought they knew him," and
none of them knew him as a re-
gent.
A graduating senior who earned
all A's in his undergraduate career
was known by 20 per cent of the
public; and one of America's best
known cosmic ray physicists by
about 30 per cent.
Praise Press
Popejoy, however, went on to
praise newspaper coverage and
editorial support in some contro-
versies relating to academic free-
dom at UNM in the past two
years.
Because "the people of New
Mexico . . . as well as the press
recognize the importance of aca-
demic freedom at the university,
I do not believe that we will. in
the years ahead, receive any im-
portant criticisms of our faculty
when they are exercising the
rights which are given to them
in their profession," he concluded.

Together, the organization rep-
resents 97 schools enrolling 27
per cent of all U. S. students.
The oldest of the merging
groups is the Association of State
Universities and Land-Grant Col-
leges which is holding its 77th
annual meeting in Chicago this
week. It comprises the institutions
created under the Morrill Land-
Grant Act of 1862.
The State Universities Associa-
tion is composed of the major
state universities not beneficiaries
of the Morrill Act. Those schools
are also members of the National
Association of State Universities
which combined schools built un-
der the Ordinance of 1787 which
gave grants to the new states to
found "seminaries of higher
learning."
The association is composed of
public schools except for Cornell
University and Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology. Together
the membership awards about
half of all graduate degrees each
year.

ORDER NOW
STATIONERY
PENCILS
MATCHES
i PLAYING CARDS
COASTERS
ORDERS SHOULD BE PLACED NOW
TO INSURE DELIVERY IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS
Ramsay Printers, Inc.
Stationers--Printers-Engravers
119 E. Liberty-Phone NO 8-7900

Ann Arbor Folk and Jazz Society Presents

TONIGHT 8:30 P.M.
AAAFIHA-CORE
FOLK SING
AT FRIENDS CENTER
1416 Hill Street
50c donation to CORE legal defense fund

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY
presents
Q O
' . N V. 20, 21, 22, 23
$00, $1.50, $2.04
S . Tickets on sale now
Lydia Mendelssohn: Nov. 18-19, 9-5
Nov. 20-23, 9-8
- - t - o --y =o - =<-:o --o -o< -yo c-o< --yo -->o t

>I

LESTER
FLATT

EARL
SCRUGGS

MORE MSU STUDENTS:
EDP Expansion Program Causes Stir

I
_
I
.

i
f
I
l
G
i
i
s

V4
1. What's the matter, no appetite?
I have more important things
to think of than food.
3. You're kidding?
Not at all. I've reached a
milestone today. I'm 21. The
days of my youth have flown.
r
+t
5. How come you're not a member
of the Drama Club?
Already my father's
talking about my being
"self-supporting."I see
responsibilities all around

2. Worried about exams, huh?
No, about getting old.
4. You should be celebrating
not brooding.
The age of responsibility
is upon me.
l 1*
6. Relax. You can let Livin
Insurance from Equitable take
care of responsibilities. It ca
provide for your family, your
mortgage, the kids' educa w'
... even build a sizahe

(Continued from Page 1)
tion to regular academic channels
during the first five years of ED.
The core of the staff will be comn-
posed of faculty members, but
some persons will be brought in
from outside the university to
work on the project.
During the same period of time,
the regular university staff known
as the "on-going group" will con-
tinue to operate the present MSU
program. Regular academic groups
will carry out modifications con-
nected with EDP in addition to
maintaining their regular pro-
grams .
The creation of a special group
to propose modifications in the
academic program has been laud-
ed by many faculty members as
a significant advance over the
first program which was approved
by the Board of Trustees last
February.
Foot Dragging
The history of EDP began of-
ficially nearly a year ago in Jan-
uary when MSU President John
A. Hannah slapped the faculty inj
a speech for dragging its feet in
efforts to improve academic pro-
grams at MSU.
Hannah called for a "radical
change in procedures if we are
to accommodate the larger num-
bers of students headed our way
without diluting the quality of
their education." He emphasized
the need for extensive reorganiza-
tion of the course structure to
narrow the number of courses and
for a reevaluation of the present
grade requirements for staying in
school,
He suggested that in light of
rising admission standards at
MSU , it might be feasible to low-
er the graduation requirement to
a numerical grade of 60 or a "D"
letter grade. He also questioned
the justifiability of offering 2,386
undergraduate courses when the
average student is only able to
take 60.
Sabine Study
Following Hannah's speech, a
special committee was formed by
the Board of Trustees to expedite
academic reevaluation. The com-
mittee was placed under the direc-
tion of Gordon A. Sabine, vice-
president for special projects and
subsequently transferred to the
jurisdiction of the late Provost
Clifford Erickson. The newestj
EDP plan approved by the Aca-
demic Council and the Board of

Trustees was devised by a special
Educational Policies Committee
under the direction of Acting Pro-
vost Howard R. Neville.
The generality of the new ED?
proposals was simply stated by
Duane Gibson, chairman of the
Educational Policies Committee
and a professor of sociology and
anthropology. He said, "It should
be understood that EDP is an ap-
proach to future problems and
not a prescription for specific
problems."
Hot Controversy
In spite of the lack of specifics
in EDP, it has created a hot con-
troversy among faculty members
for the past year. Bernard Duffey,
a professor of English at MSU for
15 years, announced his resigna-
tion last February and named
EDP as the major reason for his
decision.
Duffey said his prime objection
to EDP was that it had been de-
signed and announced last year
before faculty members had been
consulted. He cited a "definite
rift" between the faculty and ad-
ministration at State as a reason
for his leaving.
When the second EDP docu-
ment was considered by the Aca-
demic Council this October, it
had already been distributed to
faculty members before the meet-
ing. The Educational Policies
Committee which drew up the
new EDP was composed mainly of
faculty members rather than ad-
ministrators.
The main controversy over EDP
still centers around the question
of whether unlimited enrollment
is desirable or possible without
injuring the quality of education.
Administrators, headed by Han-
nah, solidly back the land-grant
philosophy of unlimited enroll-
ment and admission for every

qualified student. They say EDP
will be able to find methods of ac-
commodating the mushrooming
number of students without rais-
ing tuition or lowering the quality
of education.
Many faculty members doubt
this is possible. Most of the doubt-
ers refuse to give their names,
but a survey by the State News,
MSU's student newspaper, re-
vealed the new project has still
not ended faculty unrest.
A professor of American
Thought and Language, one of
MSU's basic courses, said, "I'm
not a person who thinks the
project is a work of the devil, and
I don't think most faculty rmem-
bers are insensitive to the enroll-
ment problems MSU faces because
it is a large university.
Illogical Assertion
"However, I feel it is not hon-
est to assert that EDP can pro-
vide more students with a cheaper
and better education. This seems
illogical."
Another professor pointed out
there has to be some line where
the number of students will im-
pair the quality of the education-
al process. He said the main flaw
in EDP is that it refuses to dis-
cuss that line.
Another aspect of the problem
was brought out by Warren Huff,
a member of the Board of Trus-

tees, at a meeting of student lead-
ers before the term began.
University Enrollments
Huff pointed out that project-
ed MSU enrollment figures are
based on the assumption that all
other state-supported colleges will
continue to admit their present
percentage of the state's total en-
rollment. If the University would
cut its undergraduate enrollment
percentage, it would pose a prob-
lem for MSU.
Administrators and f a c u 1 t y
members agree on one thing con-
cerning EDP - that no one really
knows its specific content or po-
tential effects on the university
yet.

and THE FOGGY MOUNTAIN BOYS

TOMORROW-Nov. 16-8:30 p.m
Ann Arbor High Auditorium
All Seats Reserved: Tickets $3.50, 2.75, 2.00, 1.75
Tickets on Sale at The Disc Shop,
1201 S. University
& The Record Center, 304 S. Thayer

U

MAKE A STRIKE
WITH YOUR DATE
Michigan Union
Bowling Alleys
Open 7 days 1-1 1 P.M.
Automatic Pinsetters

i
f
r

0 o
o r

NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson

Friday 8:00 p.m. FIRESIDE CHAT, "Psychology
(Free Will) and Religion," leader: Alan Fontana
Saturday-DUNKERS' HOUR after the game
Sunday-INFORMAL BREAKFAST following
9:30 Mass

-i

r:;:
I
I
i
'!
i
I
I ...

I - - -

REGISTRAI

'.::l:::.: ."."::::......l:: JJh'J:::::::: '.".VJ.'::: '.'.'J. :.: J.':::.":.:' .J............ . . ..... ..i::::: ....... ..::ii.'".' :: . .. ".......J.....
:: :.:: ::.. J+.""".
:":':^ :':'i' J
J.*tJ.YJ." 4'^YtN.Y
.:M . ..J .
... .... ..J:Y". ~. ".
....J....Ji.':'.':l ': '.:'::::::"i.: ::::::'; :: :".:.'.'t."JlJ.::" ""y" ..............::":::::'::. :::.::''.:'.'...:'t:a{ .'::i::ti:J::t::::': 11:::'f:tf:::{:':::}." :'.ti:':is^:::'%:.... J. 1:.:............ .". J. J... Ja .J..M..A. Y.1M1: t OJ iw {JJ J
............................... J . '.

RUSH

SORORII

TY'
FION
:'9

LEAGUE
Today and Saturday
November 15, 16th
9:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M.

rMr

Gov. Ross Barnett
OF MISSISSIPPI
will speak on
"Constitutional Government
and the Rights of the States"
MONDAY, Nov. 18, 7 p.m.

NO SIGN-UPS

::.r:::.: ::. :. _
: ... :.. : ::::;s:: :;;::

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan