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November 15, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

w

1

CORRECTION!

'U' Scholars UNDER GOVERNMENT GRANT:
Participate 'U' Begins Chil(

"ARSENAL" will be playing Nov.
(instead of Nov. 15,16)

14 & 15

1 Study Program in Flint Slum

11

and
"SATURDAY NIGHT & SUNDAY MORNING"
Will be playing Nov. 16, 17
(instead of Nov. 17,18)

In Iew Plant
The Michigan Scholars in Col-
lege Teacher program, initiated
at the University in September,
facilitates the progress of out-
standing students toward the re-
alization of an academic career.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
first in a series of articles on the
Curriculum Development Program
in Juvenile Delinquency being car-
ried out by members of the Social
Work School, the sociology depart-
ment and the Institute for Social
Research.)
By JEFFREY GOODMAN
A field program to study and
help children with anti-school
and anti-social attitudes is in
progress under a federal govern-
ment grant.
The study, which is being car-
ried out in a Flint slum, is part
of the Curriculum Development
Program in Juvenile Delinquency.
The program includes this and 11
other projects. A total of nine pro-
fessors in the Social Work School,
sociology department and Insti-
tute for Social Research are in-
volved.
Under the direction of Prof.
Ronald Lippitt of the ISR, Charles
Jung is presently working with
students, teachers and youth
practitioners (professionals or
volunteers with special training
in handling youth).
Two Schools
His area of operation is two
Flint elementary schools which
have high delinquency rates.
The scope of the project was
initially experimental. Executives
of the Flint school system claimed
that something ought to be done
with "in-betweeners," children too
young to leave school but already
showing markedly aggressive feel-
ings toward established school
authority and goals.
A major purpose of Jung's pro-
gram is to collect data and de-
velop ideas for educational pro-
grams aiding teachers and youth
practitioners in their work with
deviant children.

y _ _ . .

I

The project is divided into four
action areas. The first offers spe-
cial human relations training to
regular classroom teachers having
special problems with their stu-
dents.
A second area involves special
classrooms with trained teachers.
Children diagnosed as having so-
cial and emotional problems in-
terfering with their school adjust-
ment spend half their day in
these classrooms.
Another area includes after-
school clubs with two socio-emo-
tionally handicapped children
and 15 others screened as being
emotionally stable.
Visiting Teachers
The fourth area brings visiting
teachers - professionals, with so-
cial work training, whose role in
the schools involves counseling --
in contact with parents of the
handicapped children.
All four program areas are
based on the concept of a "mul-
tiple entry" approach into the
child's world. The basic assump-
tion is that all of the interper-
sonal influences on a youth's
attitudes and goals - such as
those from teachers, parents and
peers - interact in a dynamic
fashion.
Change in any one of these in-
fluences alone may not yield what
Jung terms the overall desired ef-
fect of more positive attitudes
toward school and society.
Attention to All
Thus attention must be given
to all the "entries" which influ-
ence a child's school orientation,
and work in any one area must
be coordinated with work in all
others.
One particular finding from

previous research already supports
this concept. Jung had deter-
mined that a child's peer group
is a crucial definer of his be-
havior. The anti-authoritarian

ing sensitivity to interpersonal re-
lationships and modes of reducing
aggressive behavior. Teachers
were encouraged to support de-
viant students in integrating with
pro-school peers.
In the special classroom area of;
the project a trained teacher con-
centrates on gaining the respect
of the handicapped children; be-
coming accepted as someone who
can understand them and as,
someone whose example the chil-
dren will follow.
Jung himself participates as
leader of some of the after-school
clubs, which seek to develop skills
of relating to others. The various
activities of the clubs include
trips to learn about community
resources, intramural sports and
money raising.
Suggestions
Many of the activities are sug-
gested by the club members them-
selves. Jung tries to help members
develop a sense of responsibilityj
for initiating and c a r r y i n g
through their own programs.
Further, evaluation of the vis-
iting teacher-parent consultations
indicates a generally high level of
acceptance on the part of parents
for the series of discussions on
academic, family, social a'd emo-
tional problems relating to the
children.
At present, Jung is involved in
interpreting data gathered from
the program areas. He uses three
behavioral criteria: the child's
academic progress, his relations
with peers and with teachers. He
has found that a combination of
ratings made by the children
themselves in these three areas
are significantly correlated with
the child's observed behavior.
Three Criteria
The three criteria are looked at
in terms of four variables, upon
which the children rate them-
selves and others. These variables
are the subject's perception of the
behavior of others in the three
areas, his perception of their ex-

pectations of him -in each area,
his desire to please them and his
view of the extent to which others
will be angry if he does nog do
what they prefer. Jung terms
these variables the "messages"
the child gets from others.
In addition, Jung distinguishes
between persons normally relating
to the child but not trying to help
the child and persons relating to
the child in one of the program
action areas. The former he calls
"ongoing systems" and the latter
"planned intervention systems."
On the basis of these defini-
tions, he comes up with the fol-
lowing findings:
1) The combination of messages
about criterion behavior from
people important to the child can
predict significantly to his inter-
personal behavior;
Intervention Systems
2) Messages from the interven-
tion systems are significantly more
positive than those from the on-
going systems;
3) The more incongruence ex-
isting between the messages on
criterion behavior, the greater is
the child's propensity to behave
in an undesirable manner, and
4) Many of the deviant subjects
receiving the most intervention
report a significantly larger in-
congruence between messages in
a given area than those receiving
less intervention.
Important Area
Jung considers the last finding
of special importance. It implies,
he says, that the effect of a dis-
crepancy between increased posi-
tive messages from the interven-
tion system and continuing nega-
tive messages from another area
may actually outweigh the effect
of the positive message.
It is therefore crucial, he says,
that programs in all areas be
carried out in a co-ordinated
fashion. Only in the proper bal-
ance with other forces is any
single force apt to have the de-
sired effect.

PROF. RONALD LIPPITT
... program director
child tends to feel rejected by the
pro-school, pro-teacher elements
and to form an anti-school, anti-
teacher subgroup.
Acceptance by and integration'
into the pro group is therefore
crucial, and these objectives will
be best achieved by working with
the various peer groups rather'
than solely through a one-to-one
relationship between child and
youth worker.
In the first of the program
areas, training was offered regular
teachers with an eye to develop-

FLY STUDENTS
FACULTY
EMPLOYEES
TO
round trip
BOSTO N
(Logan International Airport)
INCLUDES: CONTACT;
Christmas Vacation .
Mr. Paul Weinberg
' Charter air flight 238 Anderson, E.Q.
y' Buses to and NO 5-4111,
from "'M" Union LEAVE DEC. 21 ext. 140
Dinner on Plane RETURN JAN. 12 6-8 p.m.

50% OFF

1

on our large selection of
FOLKWAY RECORDS

at

USNSA Co-Op
330 Nickels Arcade
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday

!"T T s

Make Your Weekend More Enjoyable...Dine Out at Ann Arbor's Finest Re!

;traurants

THE ROMANOFFS
GERMAN CUISINE
BREAKFAST-LUNCHEON -SNACKS
ON THE CAMPUS
IN THE BELL TOWER MOTOR INN-N. THAYER
CHEF ROMAN PHILLIPS, Proprietor
[OLD HEtIDELBER

STEAK AND SHAKE
CHAR-BROILED STRIP SIRLOIN
$1.30
LIVER AND ONIONS
$1.00
above include salad, potatoes, roll and butter
1313 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
"PIN ROOM"
Colonial Lanes
serving
FINE FOODS and COCKTAILS
ENTERTAINMENT
EVERY SATURDAY NITE

i i m.. - . - ai

t

For a delicious
lunch, dinner or snack,
bring your guests to
PREKETE'S
SUGAR BOWL
serving Ann Arbor
since 1903
(Children Welcome
Serving Children's Portions)

9le VIRGINIIN
RESTAURANT

State Street on Campus

Phone NO3-3441

FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY SPECIAL DINNER
GRILLED SPECIAL
NEW YORK STRIP STEAK
Onion ring garnish, french fried potatoes, 50
tossed green salad, roll and butter,
hot, delicious coffee....... ..... .

211-213 N. Main St.

NO 8-9753

SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER
Turkey, Ham, Duck, Tenderloin Tips,
Chicken, Strip Sirloin Steak with all
the trimmings.............. ..$1.95
PREKETES' SUGAR BOWL
serving your favorite
Cocktails, beer, wine, or champagne

Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR

HOURS: 7 a.m. 'til 8 p.m. Doily

CLOSED TUESDAYS

PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 11 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays

NO 2-3808
or NO 2-2655

1950 S. Industrial Hwy.
Ann Arbor, Michigan

i
5

OUR

2 e 14ciou4

""
e - {
. 'r

PANCAKES

I, ----"--
'3 Enjoy the Finest
CANTONESE
FOOD
Take-out Orders Anytime
Open Daily
from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Closed Monday
Y

Open 7 a.m.-2 a.m.
109 S. Main St. L

..
,
k

STUDENT HOUR 9-12

I

I

i

THOMPSON'S RESTAURANT
9a1nowu4 6' 9iiw %9d
offers you a taste treat
of a traditional Italian dish
PIZZA/
will be served doily from
12 Noon to 2 P.M. and 5 P.M. to Z A.M.

f .
ry : Relax ..
music o
Paul
Tompkins
while enjoying food at its finest
at

are brought to you
from recipes collected

I!

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