100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 14, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVI

PAGE T WOT ilE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, NOV

I

Departments
To Consider
Promotions
(Continued from Page 1)
the new letter makes it a little
clearer that people who are out-
standing as teachers but have
little research to their credit will
be promoted-though it probably
will take a little longer," he said.
A major reason that research is
so important is that a widely-pub-
lished faculty member achieves
more national "visibility" and is
more likely to receive offers from
other institutions than is a good
teacher, whose renown generally
is confined to the University, Dean
Thuma commented.
Executive Group Decides
The executive committee, in-
cluding the dean and six literary
college faculty members, is the
group that decides which faculty
members in the college will be
promoted. This committee's deci-
sion must be approved by the up-
per administration and the Re-
gents.
Dean Thuma said charges in
the college's promotion policies
usually occur as the membership
of the executive committee
changes. But since its faculty
members have staggered terms:
and because of the continuing
membership of the dean, these
changes occur gradually, he ex-
plained.
"Twenty years ago, research was
the main thing considered; while
service to the University was given
almost no weight. But expansion
has meant more administrative
weight thrown on the average fac-
ulty member, so the administrative
factor has becomemore important
than it used to be."
And "since Dean Hayward
Keniston's regime in the 1940's,
there has been a greater emphasis
on teaching," Dean Thuma said.
Other Considerations
In addition to individual fac-
ulty members' qualifications, the
executive committee c a u t io n s
chairmen to consider "other fac-
tors which involve the department
and the college.
"A promotion to assistant pro-
fessor normally implies the issu-
ance of a three-year contract, and
higher ranks involve tenure.
Chairmen must, therefore, con-
sider the way in which the candi-
date will fit into the present and
foreseeable future of the depart-
ment," the letter states.

i

WHAT TYPE OF INDIVIDUAL?
Kaplan Talks on Prime!
AWN. of-19to w- M

I

y OutlinesU' APPROPRIATIONS
Major Task Beadle May Be Benefactor To Budget
- - --e fr 11

Problem of
(Continued from Page 1)
ness is essential everywhere,
whereas there is an enormously
greater range of opportunities
than we have been exposed to."
Citing the example of the Yid-
dish theatre in Russia, Prof. Kap-
lan observed that the creative life
of an artist was the substance of
life for most of these Jews, "yet
they would not have hesitated to
rehearse on Saturdays nor smoke
cigarettes while they were doing
it. Israel is 90 per cent Jewish yet
a large number of its people are
hostile to the formal Jewish re-
ligion and many others are in-
different. When we are not aware
URI Designs
Stuy-Rooms
By Intercollegiate Press
KINGSTON, R.I.-A $10 million
residence complex, designed to cre-
ate a climate of learning and
meaningful social development,
will be built at the University of
Rhode Island, it was announced
here recently.
Noting that not all of the edu-
cational process can take place in
the classroom, a URI Committee
on Housing told its architects "a
major portion of the student's life
is in the place of residence" where
55 to 65 per cent of his studying is
done and more than 80 per cent of
this ina his room.
As a result the architects de-
signed a series of "environments"
built one upon ainother, starting
with a private, "meditative" space
for each student. This individual
space is provided in a double room
of unusual design which allocates
to each student a private desk,
window, and bed, where he can
work, study, or relax without being
disturbed.
Common Areas
There are also areas in the
room that are shared. The rooms
are 20 square feet smaller than
the average dormitory room, but
the space saved is pooled with that
from other rooms to develop "com-
mon" areas.
Students in four rooms, grouped
around a common living room, two
bathrooms, and an adjoining stair-
well, form a "family" of eight.

Jews Today,

For Poetry
By GAIL BLUMBERG

of the numberless ways of filling
them, then we turn inward and
become tortured."
Commenting on theextraordi-
nary disproportion between the
inputs-the factors that play a
part in the formation of a Jewish
identification, and the outputs-
what this Jewishness is amounting
to, Prof. Kaplan noted that many
Jews allay the discomfort of this
discrepancy by denying that non-
Jews may make valuabletcontribu-
tions or by arguing that these con-
tributions are actually Jewish.
"Too often the Jew feels he is
not entitled to have any feelings
about Judaism unless they are bet-
ter than any other set of ideas.
But it is not necessary to deny
the presence of good things else-
where to affirm your good things.
The important thing for the Jew
to remember about Judaism is not
that it is unique but that it is
his."
"However, the Jew is doing very
little to provide for the future,"
Prof. Kaplan said. "We are heirs
of the past but we have been living
off the past. We admit that there
were giants in the past without
realizing that there are giants now.
Judaism is still in the making to-
day. If it is to grow as it has in
the past, the Jew must develop an
historical sense-a sense of the
historical importance of the pres-
ent and a willingness to face his
responsibilities and opportunities."
Conservatives
To Congregate
On U' Campus
Campus conservative leaders
have announced final arrange-
ments for the first annual All-
College Conservative Conference,
set for 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday in
the Michigan Union.
Steering committee chairman
Robert Ableson, '65, reports that
registration will begin at 10 a.m.,
with the keynote address by Prof.
Peter J. Stanlis of the University
of Detroit at 11 a n.
Workshop sessions will begin at
noon and run until 3:30 p.m. with
a break for lunch. Reports, adop-
tion of a statement of principles
and genetal endornements wili
highlight the 3:30 p.m. plenary
session. The conference will ad-
journ at 6 p.m.
Prof. Stanlis, the keynoter, is
a member of the Detroit English
department. He will speak on "The
Conservative Political Philosophy
of Edmund Burke "

>
1,

loted by the Legislature will be
earmarked particularly for main-
taining competitive salary levels
and toward providing for enroll-
ment increases, he revealed.
Two Areas

I

( .._

The major task of this genera-
tion of poets is to discard the
present restriction in poetical form
with its accompanying lack of
content, Robert Bly, poet and edi-
tor, said recently.
In a program of selected read-
ings with commentary, Bly pre-
sented a representative sample of
his own poetry. He also included
the work of other poets which he
had translated or marked for pub-
lication in his magazine "The Six-
PROF. STANLEY A. CAIN ties."
... biology The poets of the 1950's are al-
most entirely devoid of content in
* their work, he said. Men such as
ppAllen Tate and John Ransom
PR nshowed a retreat from modern life
in their poetry, he added.
Thinfluence that they wrought
has resulted in a stress on the
past and a gradual disappearance
Prof. Stanley A. Cain of the of content in the work of their
botany department and the na- students, Bly commented. The
tural resources school has been content of a poem should come
appointed chairman of an ad hoc from modern life as the poet sees
committee of the National Acad- it, he added.
emy of Sciences which will seek to After reading a poem represen-
evaluate the interest and probable tative of his early work, Bly ex-
extent of participation of the plained that "my earlier poetry
United States in the proposed In- has nothing in it about the pecu-
ternational Biological Program. liar agony of America now, in
The proposed program would in- these times."
volve a concerted effort on the "I want poems which express the
part of persons involved in the depression and despair of the
biological sciences to investigate American political life in more re-
the biological productivity of ter- cent decades," he said.
restrial, marine and fresh water Overcame Depression
plant and animal communities. Despite the immense experiences
On the basis of present proposals, of the Depression and World War
the program would extend over a of alostnonss ftn an ie y
period o e years, Prof Cain despair or suffering of that age
said.. appears in the poetry of the '50's.
The poramwhic is compar- The problem is attempting to
"able in many respects to the direct modern poets to draw on
International Geophysical Year, actual experience, he continued.
would also deal with human physi- "Americans have a narrow idea
ological adaptability to various of form in poetry. Since they are
sorts of environmental conditions, accustomed to the usual iambic
he noted. meter of English verse, when they
"The purpose of the program see poetry with different meter,
will be . . . to consider questions they tend to say it has bad form,"
involving the interaction of man he said.
and his environment," Prof. Cain Iambic Meter
said. When a poet is writing in iam-
"The IBP is being organized to bic meter, his mind suggests only
study productivity and human subjects suited to this meter, Bly
welfare in consideration of the commented. "Political content does
rapid increase in the numbers and not fit in here," he added.
needs of the human population of When questionedabout Alan
the world and the progressive Ginsberg, poet of the late 1950's,
changes in the natural environ- Bly said, "I admire him for break-
ment," ,he commented. ing out'and admitting that Amer-
The tentative version of the ica was unhappy. But Ginsberg
program, which is presently being took the new type of content and
evaluated by various interested welded it to the old form, and it
nations, was originated by a plan- didn't fit."
ning committee established by the In the new style of poetry we
International Council of Scientific should draw from the poetic form
Unions and its affiliated profes- of other countries or our own poe-
sional groups. try will become sterile, he said.

"Every time we've come up with more efficient "although they're
appropriations, the universities doing a better job."
cry tlat they can't go on; that Facilities are not being used to
they'll have to close their doors." capacity, particularly in night and
Yet taking the funds they get, year-round use, he says.
these schools have "always been The University has included a
able to reassess their needs and, section in its appropriation re-
continue without a noticeable de- quest explaining its facility effi-
terioration in their education, ciency. Officials have in the past
Beadle observes. objected to the Legislature's alleg-
When asked to pinpoint how the ed hypocritical bid for full-time
state appropriations are sliced too use of facilities without appro-

The University appropriation re-
quest emphasizes these two areas.
It asks a $3.2 million increase to
maintain current salary levels and
to implement a two per cent sal-

ary raise.
The request also asks as a "pro-
vision for higher enrollment," a
$3.8 million increase. This includes
almost one half million dollars to
move along the "transitional sum-
mer program"-the transition to-
wards trimester operation-which
Beadle concedes "could well be the
way to handle the growing enroll-
ment problems.
He anticipates, however,that I
other legislators may not be as
concerned in 1964 about the grow-
ing enrollment ramifications.
Long-range educational prob-
lems such as enrollment "will
probably not be the consideration,
this year," he comments. He feelsI
that the universities and colleges
can handle their current enroll-
ments despite cuts in their appro-
priation requests.
Suggest Three
For Committee
The Interfraternity Council Ex-
ecutive Committee has recom-
mended three men to the Frater-
nity Presidents Assembly for ap-
pointment to the IFC Membership
Committee.
Recommended were Ralph Rum-
sey, '65BAd, of Zeta Psi for a one
and one half year term; Thomas
Ayers,, '65, of Beta Theta Pi for
a year term, and Michial Bixby,
'65, of Delta Upsilon for a half
year term.
The recommendations must be
approved by the FPA and Student
Government Council.

thin, the schools "have been un-
able to do this or to name names"
of irreplacable faculty losses," he
notes.
Another factor making the Leg-
islature allot less money than the
colleges and universities antici-
pate, Beadle explains, is the need
for these institutions to become

priating more money to finance it
-as happened to the University
effort to establish the year-round
trimester system last year.
The proposed calendar would
require additional funds from the
state in order to hire more faculty
members to teach during an ex-
panded summer session.

________

CORRECTION!

"ARSENAL" will be playing Nov. 14 & 15
(instead of Nov. 15, 16)
and
"SATURDAY NIGHT & SUNDAY MORNING"
will be playing Nov. 16, 17
(instead of Nov. 17, 18)
M00
Japanese minstrel-philosopher
Go-To invites you to go with
rollicking good time;
NOV. 29 21, 22, 2~
tickets on sale
SA B: NOVEMBER 13-15, 9-5
Lydia Mendelssohn: Nov. 18-19, 9-5
_ Nov. 20-23, 9-8

JOINT GLEE CLUB CONCERTS
MICHIGAN and OHIO STATE

rWaltDisney1

Saturday,

November 23, 7:00 and 9:30

En
To

ding
night
AU A
Based on
Sheila Burniords A
est-selling uov91 .

$1.00, $1.50, $2.00
BLOCK ORDERS ON SALE TODAY
8:00-5:00 Hill Aud.

SPECULATIVE FIGURES:
Initiate Future Enrollment Planning

General

Sales Start Monday

LUATH
the Labrador Retr

featuring
TAO BODGER
iever the Siamese Cat the Bull Terrier

Extra: OLYMPIC ELK
Coming Friday: "TAKE HER SHE'S MINE"
HELD
DIAL OVER
8-6416 Through Saturday
"One of the finest filins that Ann Arbor has seen this fall
combines brilliant direction and magnificent acting!"
-HUGH HOLLAND] Michigan Daily
HARRIS
SPORTING
4LI Z
SR:AICHEL
SROBERTS
"Best Picture" 1963
INTERNATIONAL FILM CRITICS SUNDAY
BURT LANCASTER
"Best Actor" 1963 "The Leopard"
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

(Continued from Page 1)
"We want to grow-not for the
sake of growing-but because we
realize that admission pressures
may increase by as much as 70
per cent in the next five years. We
think the University should play
its part in meeting these demands.
But there's nothing we can do
without more money."
Little Room To Grow
Niehuss said that the University,
is "pretty close to the limit of
movement" within the range of
current appropriations. Over the
past seven years, the Legislature
has cut the University's appropria-
tions requests by a total of roughly
$50 million..
"All these enrollment figures say
is that there's more ahead of us
than we're equipped to do. Every-
one is working on the assumption
that there will be growth and
pressures-and that we're way be-
hind in our preparations," Niehuss
said.
Niehuss added that while the
University had embarked on an at-
tempt at long-range planning, "we
can't even tell you what we're go-
ing to do next year until we get
our appropriations from the Legis-
lature." As a rule, this bill is
passed in April for a fiscal year
beginning in June.
Currently, the University plans
to raise enrollment to 28,500 for
the next academic year. "But the
appropriation, if it follows the line
of the past few years, may cause
us to rethink even that figure,"
Niehuss said.

In conjunction with the enroll-
ment projections being compiled
by the OAA, both the library sys-
tem and the Office of Student Af-
fairs are now making studies to
determine their own needs.
Action by Hatcher
These studies are in response to
requests from University Presi-
dent Harlan Hatcher. In his State
of the University address in Sep-
tember, he told the faculty that
- he had asked Heyns for both pro-
jected desirable enrollment figures
iand an estimate of "the needs

which must be met if the projected
enrollments are to be permitted."
"All of us recognize," President
Hatcher said, "that the develop-
ment of a total plan for growth
for the University calls for a con-
tinuous, repetition of this cycle:
the presentation of a plan follow-
ed by a critical evaluation and the
presentation of a new one.
"There will be, therefore, ample
opportunity for faculty discussions
before the plans for any of the
schools and for the University as
a whole will be made firm."

LAST TWO DAYS
TO SUBSCRIBE

I

Students-Faculty
call 662-8871
for Cinema Guild
Program Information

I

..

c
Ann Arbor Folk and Jazz Society Presents

I

LESTER
FLATT

EARL
SCRUGGS

DIAL
2-6264

COMPLETE SHOWS
ot 1:15-3:10-5:05
7:05 and 9:10

1

HAVE NEVER
ANYTHING
r IN THE WORLD..
LIKE... JOSEPH E. LEVINE
/ presents
TYf T rflUTET/\TbT TV. .fa

I

IFC SING
NOVEMBER 15
8:00 P.M.
Hill Auditorium
ADMISSION 50c

and THE FOGGY MOUNTAIN BOYS

I

I

I

I

l i

I U II. U

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan