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November 08, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEMICHIGANDAILY

Rockefe'ller Bi ds
F -
For First Victory,
In New England
By The Associated Press
NASHUA, N.H.-Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller of New 'York opened
his quest for the Republican presidential nomination yesterday in New
Hampshire, site of the nation's first presidential primary.
The governor, conceding he is playing the role of underdog, set
out immediately to fulfill his pledge of a blitz campaign.
He added he will enter the New Hampshire and California pri-
maries but declined to say for the moment what other primary con-
tests he might consider entering.
Asked what he thought the con-
sequences will be if he lost in New
Hampshire Rockefeller replied:
"I'd be very sorry, but I'd keep
. *right on campaigning in other
primaries."

NELSON ROCKEFELLER
...primary,
Negroes Cast
Protest Vote
Collegiate Press Service
JACKSON, Miss.-Eighty thou-
sand Mississippi Negroes have cast
ballots for Aaron Henry in the
"Protest Vote for Freedom" held
Saturday, Sunday and Monday.
Spokesmen at the campaign
headquarters in Jackson feel that
the number of votes may reach
100,000 when all returns have been
counted.
The northeast section of the
state had what was described as
"a whopping turnout." Clarksdale,
a city in that sector, reported 6,-
501 for Henry, while the county ly-
ing directly outside of Clarksdale
added another 10,401.
The return in Coahoma County
also located in the northwest part
of the state reflected the exten-
sive three week campaign of the
Student Non-Violent Coordinating
Committee workers, Stanford Uni-
versity students and Yale Univer-
sity students as 17,000 Negroes
cast protest ballots for Aaron
Henry.

Opinion Polls
Referring to opinion polls that
indicate he is lagging badly be-
hind Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-
Ariz), Rockefeller said:
"I know I am an underdog in
the polls. But if one enters poli-
tics because of his belief in prin-
ciple whether he is ahead or be-
hind doesn't matter."
Rockefeller predicted the Re-
publican presidential candidate,
whoever he may be, will be cap-
able of defeating President John
F. Kennedy in the general elec-
tions.
Goldwater Silent
Vacationing Goldwater greeted
Roc1efeller's candidacy announce-
ment with silence. But an aide in
Washington insisted Rockefeller's
announcement hasn't changed a
thing.
Denison Kitchel, manager of
Goldwater's campaign for reelec-
tion to the Senate, said: "I don't
see as it changes anything at all."
The governor, after announcing
his candidacy, said he was confi-
dent that the national convention
"will write a platform and select
a candidate consistent with the
basic principles "of the Republi-
can party and the realities of the
world in which we live-a platform
and a candidate that will have
my complete support, a platform
and a candidate that will lead our
party to victory in November."
The governor was not accom-
panied by his wife, "Happy," as he
was three weeks ago when he visit-
ed the University of New Hamp-
shire, Colby Junior College and
Dartmouth, his alma mater.
The New Hampshire primary is
regarded as all important to Rock-
efeller's cause. In the judgment of
most politicians, a victory here
would go a long way toward dis-,
spelling the divorce and remar-
riage issue that they believe has
alienated the "rolling pin" vote.
A defeat could be looked upon as,
evidence that Rockefeller is unable;
to win election to the presidency.

Predicts
Problems
In City
By JOHN MEREDITH
"The biggest problem facing
Ann Arbor in the future is going
to be the new county charter gov-
ernment as set up under the new
constitution," Prof. William J.
Pierce remarked yesterday.
Prof. Pierce, who has been in-
volved in extensive research on
metropolitan area problems as
head of the Legislative Research
Center, believes that the new
form of county organization will
lead to the creation of county-
wide systems of public works.
In the past, housing develop-
ments in the Ann Arbor area have
depended on the city for such
services as water supply and sew-
age disposal. Ann Arbor has been
able to annex such areas because
of this dependence.
Public Service
If a more active county gov-
ernment takes over public services,
Ann Arbor may lose this advantage
and become hemmed in by small,
independent local units or larger
township territories, he said.
A second major problem that
Ann Arbor must soon contend with
is the inadequate supply of water
that plagues Washtenaw County.
Prof. Pierce believes that, al-
though temporary measures may
postpone a crisis for as much as
twenty years, Ann Arbor will in-
evitably have to take radical steps
to reach a permanent solution.
This solution could be in the form
of either a. tie-up with Wayne
County (which is now being con-
sidered by Ypsilanti) or a river
project bringing water directly
from Lake Erie.
Single Authority
It has also been proposed thati
the entire area of the Huron
watershed be united under a single
authority that would control the
distribution of water among the
various communities. The author-
ity would be a type of super gov
ernment, having supreme power in
certain designated areas, Prof.
Pierce noted.
Prof. Pierce sees this type of co-
ordination of service functions,
that is, the establishment of an
independent special district, as
definitely possible for the Ann
Arbor area. 'He-does not, however,
consider formation of stronger
ties with surrounding govern-
ments, such as consolidation with
Ypsilanti, either likely or desir-
able.
As Ann Arbor grows larger and
adds industry, pre'sent problems in
such fields as welfare, slum con-
trol, inadequate public recreation
facilities and increasing sdhool
enrollment will become much more
acute, he said.
Ann Arbor is currently a small
metropolitan area on the fringe of
many problems, he noted. But it
is about to become a center of
difficulty.
African Police
Search NUSAS
Collegiate Press Service
CAPETOWN - On October 17
four members of the South Afri-
can Security Police raided the of-
fices of the National Union of.
South African Students, remov-
ing several documenits and reading
all correspondence.
The four officers had a search
warrant which entitled them to
look at any material in the office,

and to search the persons of NU-f
SAS personnel for evidence of co-
operation with various organiza-
tions, including two banned poli-
tical parties.
NUSAS, which has continually
opposed the government policy of
apartheid, has recently been the
subject of government attacks.
Many sources believe that NUSAS
will definitely be banned by the
government. The sources only dif-
fer in the amount of time it will
take the government to act. Esti-
mates vary in length from one
month to one year, with most esti-
mates falling closer to the for-
mer.

ASHEVILLE, N. C. OP)-A Uni-
versity of Mississippi professor
charged last night that his home
state is a "closed society" where
the white man does not dare speak
out and the search for truth "has
become a casualty."
Prof. James W. Silver said the
people of Mississippi were sold "a
palpable and cynical hoax" that
the federal gvernment was re-
sponsible for the riot when Negro
James Meredith enrolled at Ole
Miss. He blamed the university
administration.
Prof. Silver, a member of the
Ole Miss history faculty for 28
years, said in an address prepared
for the Southern Historical Asso-
ciation:
"The Mississippian, who prides
himself on his individuality, in
reality lives in a climate where
non- conformity is forbidden,
where the white man is not free,
where he does not dare to express
a deviation opinion wthout look-
ng over his shoulder"
Truth A Casualty
The search for historical truth
-including the truth of what hap-
pened when Meredith enrolled-
"has become a casualty in em-
battled Mississippi," he said.
The 56-year-old historian, na-
tive of Rochester, N.Y., who was
chairman of the Ole Miss history
department from 1947 until 1958
under the department's "revolving
chairmanship" program, said he
was present when Meredith was
enrolled at bayonet-point. He said
on-the-scene reporting by news
media, which has been criticized
by Mississippi state officials, "was
accurate and interpretation sound
and temperate."
Projected Version
Mississippi's "closed society," he'
asserted, immediately projected
the version that the riot resulted
from federal encroachment, de-
liberately "planned by the Ken-
nedys and callously incited by
World News
Ioudu,
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Sen. Margaret
Chase Smith (R-Maine) is con-
sidering entering some primaries
next year to offer GOP voters a
"third choice" between the two
current top contenders, Gov. Nel-
son A. Rockefeller of New York
and Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-
Ariz).
PARIS - About 1500 students
who massed before the Sorbonne
to protest government education
policies were dispersed yesterday
by club-swinging policemen. The
students shouted demands for
Minister of Education Christian
Fouchet to resign and threw mud
at the police.
The students have long protest-
ed what they call insufficient gov-
ernment efforts to provide class-
rooms, laboratories and housing
for students at the university level.I
WHITE SANDS MISSILE
RANGE, N.M.-The escape system
for the Apollo spacecraft went
through an apparently successful
flight test yesterday.
The system is designed to save
astronauts if something goes
wrong in the launching of an
Apollo, the spacecraft intended to
go to the moon.
NEW YORK-The stock market
rose following two sharp declines
yesterday. Trading was the light-
est in three weeks. The final Dow-
Jones averages showed 30 indus-
trials up 1.63, 20 railroads up 1.09,
15 utilities up .43 and 65 combined
stocks up .87.
BILLIARD RO M ]

-C
MICHIGAN UNION
10:30 A.M.-10:30 P.M. Daily
Sorry girls-men only

1 :t::Nrtaez :tt? rst: si::nm:=.;,vs : ;:,..... 1

Rest your feet
at the

'CLOSED SOCIETY':
Mississippi Teacher Blasts State

Chinese
Rm2L

Food Shop
Union

PEOPLE SAY IT'S FASCINATING

This is only one of many compliments
bestowed on our shop by our ever-
increasing list of customers. We trust
you, too, will approve when you visit us.
"THE TH EE"
"Michigan's Most Beautiful Resale Shop"

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419 Detroit Ann Arbor

NO 3-2008

Coming to the
WORLD'S FAIR?

____ _. _ _ . _ _ _

IDEAS KEEP OUT-An example of what a University of Missis-
sippi professor last night called his state's "closed society," was
the removal, last spring, of six paintings from the front of the Ole
Miss Fine Arts Center. Students above are shown protesting the
removal of the paintings.

Have a question on the Vatican Council?
Interested in modernism and
liberal religious thought?
COME TO THE PLANNIN6"' SESSION
UNITARIAN STUDENT GROUP
REFRESHMENTS
1917 Washtenaw 7:30 P.M., Nov. 10
Bus leaves Union, 7:10-Markley, 7:20

Chief United States Marshall)
James McShane when he called
for tear gas."
"That cleverness in shifting the
culpability for defiance of law
from those creating the violence
to those enforcing the law could
only succeed among a people suf-
fering from a touch of paranoia,"

evitable change for more than a
century,
Of the Ole Miss riot, Prof. Silver
charged state highway patrolmen
ceased enforcing law and order
and "in fact in some cases were
encouraging the restless crowd to
demonstrate against the mar-
shals."

MOSCOW NEWS
Weekly from USSR. English or
Spanish. Depicts all aspects of
Soviet life, Full texts of Soviet
government statements. Readers
letters. One year subscription-
$2.00-by air mail. Send order
and payment to:
IMPORTED PUBLICATIONS
& PROD.
1 Union Square, N.Y.C. 3 (CH)

I

he said. Hours of Harassment
Defense Against Change He said the marshals did not
"The striking parallel between fire tear gas until after hours of
people and events of the 1850s and harassment and the army was
the 1950s brings home the' con- not called in until it was evident
sciousness , that Mississippi has the marshals were fighting for
been on the defensive against in- their lives.
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INCORPORATED STATE OF WISCONSIN 1961

FOR

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.t'
:
S ;v

F

_'_- t

ON CAMPUS
Featuring an extensive selection of:

II
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Bed-time styl
keep you coz
during the chil
nights ahead.
and warm cot
flannelette in t
popular styles
comfortable e
for lounging a

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BLIZZARD
FISHER
HART
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SOHLER
SHORTEE
BOOTS
GARMISH
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KOFLACK
P&M

/CLOTHING BINDINGS

ASPEN
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MAX HURNI
McGREGOR
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OBERMEYER
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WHITE STAG

CUBCO
COOK
MARKER
MILLER
NORTHLAND
TYROLIA
POLES
BARRECRAFTER
ECKLE
NORTHLAND
SPAAT

studying in the dorm.

A. Bermuda-collared capri pajama with
embroidered trim. Blue, yellow.
Small, medium, large. 5.98
B. Button-front sleepcoat with cotton knit,

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