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November 08, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-08

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RIDAY, NOVEMBER 8,1963

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Officials Await Budget Results

(Continued from Page 1)

n

propriation hikes to tuition raises.
Feeling such ill winds, Univer-
sity leaders must begin looking for
compromises that can be made to
reconcile its idealized budget pre-
sentation with the realities that
may lie ahead. This reconsidera-
tion takes place at all levels of
the budgeting ladder.
As the lyear moves on, the in-
dications from the capitol will be-
come clearer. On Nov. 26, Univer-
sity officials may receive some
feedback as they meet with budget
officials in Lansing to explain
their request. Later, legislative
hearings, lobbying contacts and
other sources will fill in the pic-
ture some more.
As its view of next year's finan-
cial prospects becomes clearer, the
efficiency with which the Univer-
A CPOS
Campus
MUSKET 1963 presents Sandy
Wilson's "The Boy Friend" 8:30;
p.m. today in Lydia ,Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Prof. Robert Noehren, Univer-
sity organist, of the music school,
will be heard 8:30 p.m. today in
Hill Aud. The program will include
works by Bach and Brahms.,
Professional Theatre Program
presents Pirandello's "Right You
Are (If You Think You Are)"
8:30 p.m. today in Trueblood Aud.1
IN CONCERT I

sity can make decisions likewise
will also improve. As new report;
come in from the state, Heyns an(
the deans, and each dean and hi
department chairmen, will mee-
to make increasingly - more de.
cisive changes in plans.
Legislature Decides
Finally, in late spring, the Legis.
lature will make its final decisior
on the University appropriation
Then the top University's admin.
istrators will again meet as the
budget administration committee
to determine the general purpose,
for which the appropriation will
be spent. This means essentially
deciding what to do with what-
ever appropriations increase the
state grants.
Now the 1964-65 request pro-
poses a budget increase of about
$9.4 million, to cover needs in six
general areas. According to a top
administrator, these six areas are
given approximately the follow-
ing priority:
1) Salary increases, $3.3 million,
2) Staff, books and supplies for
libraries, $585,000,
3) Provision for higher enroll-
ment, $3.8 million
4) Services for new buildings,
rehabilitation and maintenance,
$566,000,
5) Research and public service,
$851,000, and
6) Full third-term operation for
summer 1965, $1.3 million for the
first half of that term.
Cut from Bottom
Thus, if fears materialize and
the actual increase is far short
of $9.4 million, the budget ad-
ministration committee will begin
cutting at the bottom of this list.
Once these guidelines are set,
Heyns' office again will take the
ball. James E. Lesch of the OAA
explains, "Further reviews with
budgeting units ensue. There must
be and there is give-and-take in
these discussions. There are many
very difficult decisions to be
made."
The need for communication
with the faculty will become criti-
cal, for the OAA will have to di-
vide the funds among the budget-
ing units in a way that is "as
nearly responsive to their needs as
is possible.
Veto Avoided
"I presume the power of veto
over these decisions is held by the
OAA, but intelligent compromise
has prevented its use," Lesch said.
The final steps are mechanical.
Budgeting forms, reflecting al-
ready-reached agreements, will be
completed in the budgeting units
and forwarded to the OAA. Var-

JAMES LESCH
... budgeting process

SGC Names
Interview
Com it tees
By MARY LOU BUTCHER
Student Government Council
Wednesday night rounded out its
nominating committees that will
place petitioners in SGC commit-
tee vacancies.
Panhellenic President Patricia
Elkins, '64, and Scott Crooks, '65,
were appointed to the interview-
ing committee for the Committee
on Membership.
Crooks, Howard Schechter, '66,
and Gary Cunningham, '66, were
selected as interviewers of those
petitioning for positions on the
Committees on Student Activities,
on the United States National
Student Association, and on the
Student Book Exchange.
Council also accepted a sched-
ule for spring election dates and
appointed Charles Cooper, '65, as
elections director.
In further action, Council sup-
ported a motion which would al-
low all Council members to write
articles in the SGC newsletter pre-
senting the arguments upon which
SGC has based its proposals.
A two-thirds vote of Council is
required ,to mandate the person
who submitted the motion to write+
such an article.1
Also taken up at the meeting
was a discussion of a memoran-1
dam which has been sent out from
the executive committee to Coun-i
cil's committees and related1
boards.I
The memorandum stated that
"the SGC committees and related+
boards should realize that they
are not independent legislativet
bodies.
Rilecken Cites'
Science Role
(Continued from Page 1) i

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
presents
MOSCOW CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
Rudolf Barshai, Conductor
~The high expectations were so far exceeded that
one was left open-mouthed in admiration. The oppor-
tunity to hear them should not be missed."--Klein,
N.Y. Times, Oct. 1963.
"Think of all the stupendous feats that solo musi-
cians from the Soviet Union have accomplished in
recent years; multiply them by twenty-one and you
have some idea of the way this orchestra performs.
Such extraordinary music making should not be
missed."-Rich, N.Y. Herald Tribune, Oct. 1963.
WED., NOV. 13, 8:30 P.M.
in Rackham Auditorium
TICKETS: $3.50-$2.50--$2.00, ct
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER
-

AIDS FORMOSA-Prof. James Scott (right), has just returned
from eighteen months in Formosa where he and eight other Uni-
versity teachers have been cooperating with faculty members at
the University of Chengeai to improve educational facilities.
Prof. Wallace Gardner is currently in Formosa.
U' Staff Assists 1Training
Formosan Administrators

NOTICE

ious administrative offices check
them over. Subsequent to Regenta
approval they will become th
general-funds budget for fisca
year 1964-65.
The University is seeking to im
prove its budgeting procedures
One of the major problems is tha
decisions must be postponed too
long; a unit isn't sure how muc
money it will have for a fisca
year until a month before tha
year begins. Lesch outlined four
steps being considered:
Looking Ahead
-Longer-range academic plan
ning, such as that being attempted
by the Academic Affairs Advisory
Committee, a group composed o:
Heyns and the deans which is
studying the University's future.
--Better enrollment prediction
and control. By more closely fig.
uring the number of new fresh-
men, transfer students, dropouts
and returning graduate students
the University soon should be able
to predict its enrollment wel
ahead of time within a range of
20-30 students.
Integrated space planning, to let
units know farther ahead of time
how much space they will have.
-Earlier decisions about budget
priorities. "For example, it would
be better to make overall salary
increase decisions earlier in the
year. Possibly such decisions
should be made and implemented
without regard to the magnitude
of the budget increment from
Lansing, but at the expense of
lower-priority items should the

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CHAD MITCHELL
TRIO
FRI. NOV. 29-8:30 p.m.
$2.20 $3.30 $4.40
Tickets on sae-
Grinnell's WO 2-1124
1515 Woodward, Detroit
Marwil's Northland EL 6-0765
Mail Orders Accepted

increment be
said.

too small,"

Lesch

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS/Dept. of Speech present
NEXT WEEK
Wed. thru Sat.
8:00 P.M.
Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre
BOX OFFICE OPENS MONDAY-12:30-5
$1.50, 1.00
(25c additional on Fri. & Sat.)

and control difficult.
He noted that social science is
getting more expensive and com-
plex while at the same time is
l working on only small features of
larger problems.
The job of the social scientists,
Riecken said, is not only to work
toward certain specified goals, but
to question nationally accepted
goals. Research into goals and in-
sights is not merely an academic
enterprise, but a political one, he
added.
But the social scientists must
face the politician. The general
public holds the premise that cer-
tain social goals are given and
that social scientists should look
for ways and means of accom-
plishing them, he cautioned.
When a social issue is "hot"
both public agencieseand private
foundations shun research on it.
They fail to see the distinction
between the social scientist who
is a political radical and the one
who is an intellectual radical,
Riecken noted.
He said foundations shun spend-_
ing on intellectually radical ideas
because they occur infrequently,
officials who review proposals
tend to be conservative and social;
scientists tend to suffer from a
rather narrow and limited vision.
of the future shape of the social
and behavioral sciences may be
in the future.
Prof. James G. Miller of the'
psychology department suggested
that 10 per cent of foundation
money be set aside for projects
approved by minorities of the re-
view board. This "crackpot pot"
would be used to help the intel-
lectually radical project that needs
financial support.

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By BARBARA SEYFRIED
In hopes of supplying the need
for trained business administrators
caused by a 10 year industrial
boom on Formosa, Prof. James
Scott of the business administra-
tion school and eight other Uni-
versity teachers are participating
in a project sponsored by the
United States Agency for Inter-
national Development.
Five instructors went over
originally, three have returned
and have been replaced by four
others.
"We went to Formosa to provide
professional advice for the Chinese
and to help them improve their
education facilities in the fields
of public and business administra-
tion at Chengchi University."
Three Objectives
Three general objectives of this
four-year project have been to
improve academic education in the
fields of public and business ad-
ministration, stimulate research
nto Chinese administrative prob-
ems, and to develop a national
center of information in Business
and Public Administration, he ex-
plained.
Prof. Scott said, "One of our
first acts was to work with a spe-
cial committee of Chengchi fac-
ulty members in laying plans for
buildings to house a Center of
Business and Public Administra-
ion, completed in 1963. Since then
second building has been ap-
roved and is to be built."
"Together we then prepared a
urriculum for an undergraduate
chool which was presented to
he Chengchi faculty, discussed,
evised and eventually presented
o and approved by the Ministry
f Education," he said. "The pro-
ram went into effect in 1962."
Lack of Trained Faculty
There were not enough trained
aculty members available for
eaching the new courses at
hengchi so, at present, 11 Chi-
ese students are here in the
raduate schools of business and
ublic administration.
The problem, when it came to
tudents, was not lack of them but
rn abundance. Students are ad-
0itted to the schools on Formosa

Ton the basis of their scores on a
week long,national, college en-
trance examination. However, the
1 availability of educational facili-
ties only permit about 30 per cent'
of those who take the test to
enter college. As a result many
qualified people are left out, Prof.
Scott Said.
"The graduate program in busi-
ness and public administration
proposed for Chengchi has been
approved by the Ministry of Edu-
cation in China and will start in
1964. This entails more Chinese
faculty members coming to the
University to get additional train-
ing.
Military and Engineering
Since many business executives
on Formosa have either military
or engineering backgrounds an
In-Service training program was
introduced to provide them with
background in administration and
management.
Consisting mainly of intensive
seminars lasting from three days
to one month, the program is de-
signed to show the most imme-
diate effects of the entire project
in that businessment can apply
what they learn immediately to
everyday business matters."
Since it is not a good idea to
use American textbooks in many
Chinese courses an effort is being
made to stimulate research into
Chinese business problems and to
write textbooks based on them.
Immediate needs for texts in these
courses are being supplied by
passably translated American
books until Chinese texts can be
written, he said.
Professors Scott, William R.
Gable and Odell Waldby returned
after the initial 18 months of the
project and were replacedrby
Prof. Wallace Gardner, Prof.
Bruce Mason, Elwin Mauck and
Fred Black. Still in Formosa are
James R. Brady and William De-
Voll.
5

DIAL 8-6416

NEVER BEFORE HAS T
EXPLODED WITH SUC
RA W EMOTIONS!

HE SCREEN
H
RICHARD
HARRIS
'THIS
SPORTING
LI E'
RACHEL
ROBERTS
Alan BADEL
William HARINELL

NOW 4zi N!

at
7-9 P.

"An American in Paris" has
been cancelled by the producer.
Instead Cinema Guild presents
last times at 7 and 9 TON IGHT-
A wild and wacky comedy of the
late 30's, in technicolor and
starring Carole Lombard and
Frederic March, directed by
William Wellman.

CALL 662-8871
for further information

React anl1Use Daily Classified Ads

"Best Picture" 1963
. INTERNATIONAL FILM CRITICS
"Best Actor" 1963
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

N
PROF
PIRA
TRUEBLOOD
THEATRE

OW PLAYING (Fri. & Sat.)
ESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
presents
A .
LO B
NDELLO'S BRILLIANTDRM

0~

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NOW

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ua

AI

DIAL
5-6290

WORLD'S
FAIR
FRI. AND SAT.

L'I~b' ®FflE0cD

eats Now at Box Office

THURS. 8:3
FRI. 8:30
SAT. 8:30

SEE MUSKET'S
'TH"E BOY FRIEND
a musical comedy of the 1920's
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