100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 27, 1963 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-08-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

!EN THE MICHIGAN DAILY T
GBY, SOCCER, SHOOT ING, SKIING, SAILING:
Non-Varsity Sports, Clubs Vary Campus Life on Land

ESDAY, AUGUI
Sea

By TOM WEINBERG
and PERRY HOOD
quarter-million dollars is put
'y the Board in Control of
ollegiate Athletics for rugby
cer players, for rifle and pis-
looters, for sailors or skiers,
ret these non-varsity sports
go on in their seasons at
gan.
the fall the rugby team takes
eld-Wines Field, that is. The
composed mostly of gradu-
udents, law students and for-

C,

eign students, plays a regular
schedule of games with teams
mostly from Canada.
Just as Rough
The rugby games are as rough
as football, with very similar ac-
tion to American football. It is
played on a football field with a
blown-up ball which looks like a
soft watermelon.
To score, the linemen; who com-
prise 8 of the 15 players, pass the
ball back to the backs. With a con-
tinuous action, stopping only for

penalties, they move the ball over
the goal line of the opponents.
The games are played at 3:30
on Saturdays, and it doesn't cost
anything to stop in and see the
second half on the way home from
a football game at the Stadium.
Interest Arouised
A newly-formed organization at
Michigan is the Michigan Ameri-
can Soccer Club. The group started
play twu years ago and has com-
peted in the International Center's
league the past two years.
Last year the team took steps

to have soccer adopted as a var-
sity sport. The movement was
basically unsuccessful, but a great
deal of interest was stirred up,
and this year the team intends to
try again, but on a larger scale.
The team has compiled an over-
all two-year record of five wins
and seven losses against teams
composed of soccer players from
abroad. Recruiting_ and practice
will begin during registration this
year, so the team will be in top
condition for its seven-game

schedule. A feature of this year's
schedule is the proposed two garfles
with a foreign teams at Eastern
Michigan.
Need Shooters
For those who can't make the
basketball team at Michigan, the
pistol and rifle teams are seeking
accurate shooters. The club aims
to teach the objectives of playing
with firearms and to compete both
on the campus and around the
nation.
There is an annual competition

at the ROTC rifle range in May.
In addition the team competes
with other Big Ten teams. The
whole shooting match is sponsored
by the team itself, and last year
it was, along with the wrestling,
gymnastics, andtrack teams, a
Big Ten champion.
The fencing club is. relatively
new and is still hoping to attract
some new members.
Two of the non-varsity sports
which are especially of interest to
women are the sailing and skiing
clubs. The ski club takes weekend

trips to the snowy regions of Mich-
igan. The enthusiasts can take
their semester break or spring
vacation and travel to Quebec or
Colorado with the skiers.
The ski club offers the latest
information on rates of ski mer-
chandise, movies on instruction in
the fast-growing sport and other
programs of interest to the ad-
vanced and beginning skier.
Lots of Sailors
The saling club is one of the
largest of the non-varsity sports

and boasts over 100 members,
both novice and experienced. The
club has eight sailboats at its
headquarters at Base Lake, 20
miles from Ann Arbor.
At weekly meetings on the cam-
pus members discuss various as-
pects of the sport and decide on
matters of importance to the club.
There is competition in regattas
all over the country, and many
Michigan representatives have
earned national or regional titles
in past years.

1f

r

N

I

,

Welcome!

TNERE IS

vrs

DEA

.

All Michigan Students

I II.I :

.1

I

AVOID THE RUSH!

BUY YOUR TEXTBOOKS FROM FOLLETT'S AS SOON

AS YOU ARE

CLASSI Fl1ED.

ASK FOR BOOKS BY

COURSE

NUMBERS. WE HAVE

ADVANCED TEXT-

A

-v

1.
/.

1 ^.
*

I

BOOK INFORMATION.

FOLLETT'S LEADS THE FIELD

I

Every advance sale guaranteed to be right or
your money will be cheerful ly refunded.

II

II

i

FRESHI

E

t

Buy

your

books ot

FOLLET T'S

r

The Best Book Store On he Michigan Campus
leadership awarded them by Michigan students year after year.
-because they have what it takes, they have the books you want, when
you want them, and at the right price - and always plenty of used
books.
It's so easy to buy your books at Follett's - self-service or clerk
assistance if you want it.

Get them early. We have a tremen-
dous stock of everything you will
need. Shop early from official Uni-
versity lists. Everything is guaran-
teed to be right.

I

III

III

I 1!) .

ntew and u1e4 T

'T

00

S

I

* Every Book for

Every

Course

r

* ALL USED BOOKS at Bargain

Prices

STUDENT

SUPPLIES

OF ALL
KINDS

MICHIGAN

"Your Friendly Campus Book Store"

BOOK

I

i

- m - m

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan