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November 05, 1963 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-05

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. t AlrlitgattBatt#
Seventy-Third Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICIGAN
- UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
"Where Opinions AreFree STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG., ANN ARBOR, MICH., PHONE NO 2-3241
Truth Will Prevail"'
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily ex press the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in al; reprints.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1963 NIGHT EDITOR: EDWARD HERSTEIN

FEIFFER -

Results Justify
Viet Nam Intervention

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DARK SUSPICIONS that the United
States not only welcomed but wangled
the Vietnamese revolution are almost uni-
versally held. Madame Nhu's earlier re-
marks that the United States was trying
Responsibility
THE CHIEF CHARGE levelled against
The Daily for the past several years
has been one of irresponsibility. The Daily
has been accused of distorting what peo-
ple say, taking remarks out of context
and not sticking to the relevant issues. We
have been aware of this problem and
taken steps to correct it.
I think it would be a reasonable request
to ask our readers and "letter to the edi-
tor" writers to give Daily editorial writers
the same consideration we try to give the
people we write about. A case in point is
the recent "letter to the editor" signed
by Charles Thomas, Jr. on an editorial by
H. Neil Berkson.
Berkson's editorial was concerned with
the Direct Action Committee's picket of
the Administration Building last Mon-
day. The main point of his editorial was
that the University does not discriminate
in its hiring. He also said that "DAC has
made no attempt to discuss its complaints
with the University officials involved. It
has presented no specific cases of dis-
criminatory hiring." He later went on to
urge Thomas to "communicate with those
in the administration responsible for hir-
ing policy."
THOMAS REPLIED to Berkson's edit as
was his right. However, in a very
lengthy letter he only devoted the first
three paragraphs to the content of the
editorial. In the rest, he told "these nice
white folks what it's like to be black and
have to live in America." This, too, is his
right; furthermore, the plight of the Ne-
gro in America deserves all the attention
it can get. However, it was not his right to
use Berkson as the focus for his attack.
"Be peaceful, Mr. Berkson says to us,"
Thomas writes. Berkson did not use the
phrase "be peaceful" at any point in his
editorial. He was not making excuses for
the Negro's position in America; in fact,
he did not say anything about it. His sole
topic of discussion was whether the Uni-
versity discriminates in hiring. Yet
Thomas went on to fabricate and attrib-
ute to Berkson an attitude toward the
Negro which Berkson does not hold at
all. If Thomas wanted to talk about Ne-
groes in America, a separate letter should
have been sent. It would have been print-
ed.
THOMAS' LETTER is only the most re-
cent in a long series of distorted letters
we have received from different people
over the years. Readers demand that The
Daily be responsible. It is not too much
to ask that they be the same.
-RONALD WILTON
Editor

to have the government overthrown may
not have been taken seriously; last Fri-
day's revolt didn't exactly discredit them.
Worldwide attention has been focused
on South Viet Nam's struggle against
Communist guerrillas and its discrimina-
tion against the Buddhists.
United States participation in the war,
though unofficial, cannot be denied. Our
soldiers have been in Viet Nam for over
three years and many have been killed or
wounded.
Meanwhile, the United States had been
urging the Diem regime to make its peace
with the Buddhists, going so far as to tell
it to repair the pagodas smashed by gov-
ernment forces last August and to make
an agreement guaranteeing freedom to
the Buddhists to practice their religion.
The United States was also trying to get
the Diem regime to restore relations with
Cambodia and to institute the vital pro-
gram for clustering outlying rural com-
munities into defended enclaves capable
of warding off guerrilla attacks.
The new leaders are loudly promising
most of the reforms that Diem refused to
institute. In itself, this justifies any
American support there may have been
for the revolution.
IT IS CLEAR that the United States at
least tacitly supported the revolution.
The United States is going to give quick
diplomatic recognition to the new govern-
ment. On the other hand, in Honduras
and the Dominican Republic, where there
have been recent military coups, the
United States has denounced the action,
suspended foreign aid and refused to
grant diplomatic recognition.
American officials concede that the
United States is going to be credited or
blamed for the whole affair, and United
States prestige and position thus will
prosper or suffer according to the actions
of the new government.
If the new government turns out to be
as much of an improvement over the old
-as many officials hope-the downfall
of Diem may be instructive to some other
countries where strong-minded rulers
are also cheerfully accepting United
States aid while operating oppressive re-
gimes in defiance of the United States'
wishes.
Also, there may be a speedier-than-ex-
pected end to the fighting there and
better-than-hoped for prospects for a
stable government capable of keeping
peace.
If the new government fails, the Unit-
ed States risks serious disruption of the
anti-Communist war effort, a dragged out
war, and a black eye for United States
prestige.
IT IS TOO EARLY yet to criticize and
evaluate the United States' role in the
revolution. It would seem that there is
more to be said on the plus side than on
the minus. However, if the new govern-
ment carries out its present plans, it
should soon be obvious that our position
was justified. -ROBERT SHLIFER

IAVE 0J
ATAUWI10
WCTI bjS?

.,

I

FeN

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR-
Only Patience Can Solve Race Problem

6

To the Editor:
JUST FINISHED reading
Charles Thomas' letter which
appeared in Saturday's Daily. It
is not difficult for me to em-
pathize with his cause or with
his urge to display outrage and
anger. I hope, however, that he
will not think me hypocritical or
want to kill me if I tell him that
he must still be patient.
Whether or not Mr. Thomas
believes it, there are some white
people in this country who want
to help the Negro, live next door
to him, work with him. I am one
of these whites, but I can tell
Mr.tThomas out of a personal
reality that his threats do not
persuade me to look sympathetic-
ally on him. His threats frighten
me (as I suppose he wants them
to) and make me unsure that I
want anything to do with im-
proving the status of Negroes like
him in this country.
* * *
MR. THOMAS should think
twice before he throws away the
chance to have sympathetic whites
on the Negroes' side. I don't think
he can afford to stir up any more
hate than already exists between
the races, hate which I hope will
disappear and be forgotten some-
day-and I mean forgotten.
If Mr. Thomas earnestly wants
equality for his people, then he
must work hard during his whole
life on the task of removing the
causes for racial bigotry, mis-
understanding and hate. He is an
intelligent man and knows that
he must stop saying things like
"it was your government that put
the gun in my hand."
MR. THOMAS, it is your gov-
ernment too, not mine alone. The
United States is only as good as
the people who live' in it. It is
up to you to believe in the prin-
ciples of the Constitution and up-
hold them with every particle of
energy at your command. And it
is up to me to do the same. You
must trust me in this. If you can-
not trust me, then you are lost.
Where suspicion festers, there
breeds hate and bigotry.
Mr. Thomas, I want to love
you. I understand your remorse
and disgust for things that go on,
even in this country. But you must
be patient. Equality for the Negro
will not be achieved over night
simply because understanding and
good faith cannot be achieved
over night. You must gather every
friend you can find, white and
Negro. Please do not hate people
you don't even know.
-David Andrew, '65
Herbiock .. .
To the Editor:
YOUR HERBLOCK CARTOON
of Oct. 30 on Barry Goldwater
is the most stupid cartoon I have
seen in The Daily yet-and I have
seen the worst in it so far. The
cartoon more than implies that
Goldwater is a creature of the
far right (i.e. the John Birch
Society) and vice versa.
Without mentioning that Presi-
dent Kennedy has appointed more
than 50 persons from the socialis-
tic A.D.A. (Americans for Demo-
cratic Action) (who believe in ad-
mitting Red China to the United
Nations, a "peaceful" approach
towards Communist Cuba, etc.), I
would like to state that Herblock
is wrong, and he cannot prove
otherwise.
For example, Robert Welch him-
self has stated that he has no
personal preference for president.
In fact, he considers Barry Gold-
water as nothing less than a "lib-
eral."
THE JOHN BIRCH SOCIETY
has never officially endorsed any
candidate for any office anywhere.
Barry Goldwater has even en-
dorsed time and time again regu-

We see that Goldwater's only
concern with victory is a victory
of freedom internationally by the
United States, and a victory of
freedom nationally by the Repub-
lican Party whether it be Nelson
Rockefeller, Richard Nixon, an
obscure Republican running for
Congress in North Dakota or
Barry Goldwater himself.
-Lee E. Hornberger, Jr., '66
Freaks . .
To the Editor:
WITHOUT giving any particular
thought to my choice I decided
to stop in at Cinema Guild Thurs-
day for a movie titled "Freaks."
Such a longdtime had passed since
I last heard a handicapped per-
son called by that name, that it
n e v e r occurred to me that

"Freaks" might refer to human
beings.
An elaborate preface to the film
stated its professed purpose to
demonstrate the true dignity of
the deformed. In fact, the entire
production was nothing but a
weak excuse for satisfying the
audience's love of the grotesque
and desires to be horrified. This
needless display of the unfortun-
ate I found neither edifying nor
amusing.
CINEMA GUILD has evidenced
the very poorest taste by bringing
this film to our campus. "Freaks"
should not have been shown here
-at least for the reason that every
deformity represented there still
has its counterpart in real exper-
ience.
We have a responsibility in por-
traying the handicapped that

WHAT KIND OF WORLD?
The Limitations
Of education

limits the freedom with which we
might treat Lilliputians and Mar-
tian spider-men. We hav to just-
ify a movie about "freaks" and
then we have to be very sure that
the justification is worth it.
At least as important as the
above, we ought to consider whvt
is the effect of this movie on our-
selves. I am aware that we are
living in an emancipated age-all
too aware. Perhaps certain kinds
of hardness, however useful, are
gained at the expense of some-
thing valuable within us.
I'm not saying this from an easy
distance. My experience with the
handicapped in state hospitals and
summer camps is fairly extensive.
The disabilities in this movie were
nothing new to me nor did they
approach the worst I have seen.
STILL, THIS parade of de-
humanized bodies, for the movie
never really succeeded in pre-
senting most of the characters as
individuals or personalities, this
parade gave me nothing but a
feeling of disgust. It is that dis-
gust that we cannot afford to lose.
Continued exhibitions of tasteless-
ness, such as "Freaks," threaten
to dull that sensibility in us until
we too suffer a kind of deformity.
-Trim Bissell, '64
Ballet . .
To the Editor:
DURING the past three years I
have been appalled at the
shoddy, unprofessional manner in
which your staff has written re-
views of outstanding professional
concert artists and groups.
Miss Becker's tragic review of
the Ballet Folklorico de Mexico is
a prime example of The Daily's
inability or unconcern in obtain-
ing qualified persons who can give
a knowledgeable and intellectual
review of a concert. The lack of
understanding of the Mexican folk
dances and music which Miss
Becker demonstrated in her piti-
fully meager review is inexcusable.
THE REVIEW demonstrated
precisely what can be written
when an author has no knowledge

of the subject she is reviewing
and has only one interest in writ-
ing-to criticize. Unfortunately
Miss Becker has a complete mis-
understanding about Mexican folk
music, thinking that a dance such
as the "Deer Dance of the Yaqui
Indians" is completely typical of
Mexican Folklore, while most of
the other dances performed lacked
"authenticity" and "dignity."
Agreed that this is a typical
dance of the Yaqui Indians, but
it is by no means typical of all,
or even most Mexican folklore.
During the past two summers I
have spent sixteen weeks in Cd.
Valles and Mexico City. While I
was there I had the opportunity
to see many folk dances performed
not by the Billet Folklorico de
Mexico but by high school stu-
dents and other nonprofessional
groups. The very typical and
popular folk dance such as La
Bamba which is danced and loved
throughout Mexico is always per-
formed with precision and vitality.
OBVIOUSLY Miss Becker was
so poorly versed in her subject
that she could neither write about
the majority of dances nor com-
ment on the authenticity of the
costumes.- Having spent most of
my time in the "land of the Huas-
tecan Indians" I was amazed to
see the excellent detail in cos-
tuming in the "Wedding in the
Huasteca Potosina." Such detail
as the small embroideried bags
which all Huastecan Indians carry
to market, and the typical yarn
which the Indian women wear
around their hair, were pleasant
surprises indeed.
In Mexico, the natives consider
the Ballet Folklorico the best
group of "authentic" folk dancers
in the country.
It is disgusting to me that The"
Daily has failed to take the ini-
tiative to seek out persons from
the University who are qualified
to evaluate intellectually the con-
cert performances which the resi-
dents and students of Ann Arbor
are so fortunate to have avail-
able to them through the auspices
of the University Musical Society.
-James S. Aneff Jr., '64

4

THE LIAISON:
Open Comments
Marjorie Brahms, Associate Editorial Director

A~r-L 4

By ROBERT M. HUTCHINS
I WOULD LIKE to propose two
new laws. The first would forbid
any person to offer education as
the "solution" for anything. The
second would prohibit anybody
from using the word "education"
without saying what he meant by
it.
Rigid enforcement of the second
law might make the first unneces-
sary, because usually education is
offered as a solution only when
the speaker has no idea what he
means by it.
But it is also true that educa-
tion may be offered as a solution
because the speaker has no clear
idea of the problem he is discuss-
ing and hence no conception of
any possible solution of it.
WE HAVE ALL heart orators
on unemployment, peace, tech-
nology, delinquency, divorce, de-
mocracy, the developing nations
and the race question bring their
melancholy reports to an opti-
mistic conclusion by saying that
education is the solution. This
shows either that they have rack-
ed their brains f-r an answer and
haven't been able to think of one
or that they be ieve they are say-
ing something when they are not.
All they can mean is that if all
of us everywhere were very much
wiser and more intelligent than
we are, we would probably get on
somewhat better than we do. This
is so obvious a truism as to
amount to saying nothing at all.
Such talk is fraudulent, and
should be made criminal.
TAKE THE simple question of
time. There is no suchthing as
i n s t a n t education. Education,
whatever it is, takes time. Even
in the most advanced industrial
country a man who recommends
education as the solution of any
problem must mean that he does-
n't have to solve it, or even to
begin to solve it, in less than 20
years.
This is the minimum time, as-
suming thehimmediate introduc-
tion of a new educational scheme,
that would be required for it to
affect the community in any sig-
nificant way. This is the time re-
quired after the program has been
formulated, accepted and put into
effect. Anybody who has had any
experience in formulating educa-
tional programs and getting; them
accepted and put into effect
knows that this adds at least an-
other 20 years to the process.
* * *
IN THE developing countries-
education is the "solution" of all
their problems-it may be possible,

that will teach 40 million people
simply to read and write. Only a
totalitarian dictatorship commit-
ted to this aim could accomplish
it in less than 20 years.
** *
THE TIME education takes is
no reason for failing to begin at
once the development of the best
possible educational p r o g r a m.
Marshal Lyautey, the great French
general, when be was in Morocco
asked his gardener to plant a
certain tree. The gardener said
that tree took 200 years to reach
maturity. The Marshal replied:
"Then there's no time to lose.
Plant it this afternoon."
But the time education fakes
is a reason for refusing to be-
lieve that it can be the "solution"
of immediate problems.
After all, if you want shade this
afternoon, you don't plant a tree
that takes 200 years-or even 20-
to reach maturity.
(Copyright. Los Angeles Times)

'A

4.

EACH TIME a student visits his academ-
ic counselor, a manila folder is present
at the interview. This is the student's ac-
cumulated academic record, compiled
throughout the school years and de-
stroyed either five or eight years after he
graduates.
It is natural to be curious about what's
in that folder and perhaps somewhat
disturbed when told that it is confiden-
tial.
ACCORDING TO Associate Dean James
H. Robertson of the literary college,
these records enable faculty members of
the various colleges to make "knowledg-
able and informed judgments" about stu-
dents when the need presents itself.
The uses and needs for these records
seem obvious. As Dean Robertson remark-
ed, they are used "judiciously" and are a
"service to students."
HOWEVER, one aspect of the confiden-
tial academic records is highly ques-
tionable. Included in the manila folder

ed" or any other subjective and superfi-
cial reaction.
If the records were open to the student,
so he would know what his counselor
thought of him, then the idea of record-
ing superficial judgments would not be
quite so objectionable. However, they are
not open. According to Dean Robertson,
this is because openness would reduce
their "accuracy" or "frankness."
THIS IS A FALLACIOUS statement. It
seems to me that a counselor would be
more accurate, more honest, more judi-
cious if he knew the student were to see
his remarks. As for frankness: if it means
license, then there is no value in it.
Fortunately, as Dean Robertson points
out, one comment alone never sank a
student. That is, one counselor's perhaps
subjective, perhaps biased, perhaps un-
thoughtful comment will not keep a de-
serving student out of graduate school.
Nevertheless, this is not a reason for hav-
ing closed rather than open records; it is
merely reassurance.

'

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