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November 05, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

P& iT WO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 5. 19R3 .

E M E W T E M I H I A D I Y TJ.flV...~l'1

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Ong Probes Course
Of Catholic Beliefs

i

By ROSALIE BAINE

"No new revelation of truths
has been given to the Catholic
Church since the death of the
last apostle," Prof. Walter Ong
of St. Louis University said yes-
terday.
In a lecture on "Catholicism,
Past and Present," sponsored by
the Office of Religious Affairs,
Prof. Ong asserted that "the
church is gradually unfolding the
revelation originally given to it,"
but that it does not teach any
new doctrine.
He pointed out that Catholics
recognize two sources of their be-
liefs-scripture and tradition. The
former consists of both the Old
and New Testaments of the Bible.
Prof. Ong defined the latter as
"the voice of Christ speaking
through the ages, not a second
book of the Bible which the Cath-
olics have but won't let the Prot-
estants read."
Important Customs
Many important Christian cus-
toms, such as going to church on.
Sunday instead of Saturday, the
Sabbath, are attributed to tradi-
tion, he said.
Institutions of the church were
established either by Christ and
the apostles or by the church
through the ages. However, those
set up by the church have some
basis in the Bible, he added.
Postpone Date
Of Dedication
Prof. James T. Wilson, acting
director of the Institute of Science
and Technology, announced yes-
terday that the dedication of the
new IST Bldg. on North Campus
will not take place until "some-
time next spring."
The dedication, which had been
scheduled for this fall, will be held
up, Prof. Wilson noted, until the
biophysics laboratory is completed.
The lab is scheduled to be finish-
ed shortly after December.

PROF. WALTER ONG
...Catholicism
To prove this, Prof. Ong used
the example of the papacy. The
powers of the Pope were given to
Peter by Christ when he said,
"You are Peter, and upon this
rock I will build my church," in-
dicating that the church was to
have a head, Prof. Ong said.
Private Revelations
In regard to private revelations
of God, such as those claimed by
Bernadette Soubirous of Lourdes,
Prof. Ong pointed out that no
Catholic is required to believe in
these. The church says only that
the ideas promulgated at places
such as Lourdes are not harmful
to the faith of any Catholic.
This does not mean that the
church asserts the truth of such
apparitions, he said.
Prof. Ong opposed the idea of
"primative Christianity corrupt-
ed by the church." He pointed out
that in St. Paul's letters to the
early Christians he often admon-
ished them for their faults. The
Middle Ages were not so com-
pletely Catholic as is generally be-
lieved, while the Renaissance saw
many improvements in the Cath-
olic Church.C

SGC Board
To Request
Job Survey
By NANCY FOX
The Human Relations Board of
Student Government Council plans
to submit a request soon to Vice-
President for Business and Fi-
nance Wilbur K. Pierpont, asking
that a comprehensive study be
made of the University employ-
ment structure in an attempt to
remove structural barriers to the
employment of minority group
members.
The proposed study would cover
all areas of University employ-
ment including recruitment pro-
cedures, on-the-job training pro-
grams, placement and opportunity
for advancement.
According to Human Relations
Board Chairman David C. Aroner,I
'64, such a study "would be con-.
sistent with other programs of thef
University in its recent effort to
fulfill its responsibilities to mi-
nority groups."
Passive Discrimination
The board feels that there is
discrimination of a passive nature
on the lower levels of the em-
ployment structure and that prej-
udice sometimes hinders place-
ment and promotion according to
merit, he said.
Realizing, however, that an in-
stitution which employs over 10,-
000 people often unconsciously
gives rise to some discrimination
on a personal level, the board is
confident that their proposal will
be considered carefully and acted
upon in the best interests of the
University and its employes, Aron-
er added.
Another future project is to in-
vestigate the possibility of initiat-
ing a policy to prevent the Uni-
versity from entering contracts
with building trade unions which
discriminate in their apprentice-
ship or admission policies, he said.
Union Labor
Aroner suggested that union la-
bor from another county be em-
ployed if local unions do not fit
the new specifications.
Aroner noted that recently the
board has rot heard much about
discrimination from students and
suggested that they avail them-
selves of the services of the board
in such cases.

UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF:
Odiorne Surveys Local Labor

By ROBERT CUMMINGS
Prof. George S. Odiorne, director
of the Bureau of Industrial Re-
lations at the University, has re-
cently completed the second phase
of a study of Washtenaw County's
manpower.
The conclusions he has arrived
at cause him to question the wis-
dom of the federal government's
policy for relieving unemployment,
he revealed in an interview Satur-
day.
Prof. Odiorne felt that the fed-
eral government is cancelling any
hopes of improving the unemploy-
ment situation when it advocates
a tax credit to industry for ex-
panding investment while imple-
menting its Manpower Develop-
ment and Retraining Act.
Capital Gains
He noted that industry uses
the capital gains from tax credit
for automation, thus eliminating
many of the jobs that the man-
power act is training workers for.
A second criticism of federal
policy was directly derived from
Prof. Odiorne's study. "President
John F. Kennedy, Walter Heller,
his chief economic adviser, and
the tax cut people are saying if
we cut taxes we'll eliminate un-
employment," he said.
"This may relieve cyclical un-
employment but local studies show
that cyclical unemployment is not
the most significant form."
Most Comprehensive
Prof. Odiorne, noting that the
study he . has supervised is the
most comprehensive local study he
is aware of in the country, found
that "hard core unemployment is
the crucial problem in America's
affluent society."
The hard unemployed are not
those that are affected by the
AAUTP To View
Role of Faculty
The University "chapter of the
American Association of Univer-
sity Professors will discuss facul-
ty participation in three Univer-
sity schools and colleges at 8 p.m.
today in the East Conference Rm.
of the Rackham Bldg.
All teaching and administrative
staff members of the University
are invited to attend and partici-
pate in the discussion.

JOHN

VALERIE

ALEC

signs for local and corporation re-
training programs, as well as adult
education programs. Prof. Odiorne
said his basic assumption is that
the hard core problem of America's!
affluent society demands local
solutions as opposed to the broad
fiscal measures which Kennedy's
Council of Economic Advisers and
Congress are focusing on.
j He added that this assumption
is based on his observation that
local corporations and businesses
'first look to their own employes
and the local labor force to fill
newly created jobs, and only if the
local supply is insufficient, do em-
ployers recruit from outside.
Predicted Trends
Apart from his findings on the
present unemployment situation,
Prof. Odiorne also predicted fu-'I
ture occupational trends and pre-
pared material 'to describe the
PROF. GEORGE S. ODIORNE work situation of critical areas.
... labor survey As an example of the use of this
- material, he cited the University
''ups and downs" of industrial pro- Research Park which will even-
duction or business sales, nor those tually employ over 15,000 people.!
with a minimum of skills who face The descriptive material indicates
structural displacement, he com- the types of jobs that will be cre-
mentedu ated. This information will be of
Ryeuse to Ann Arbor businessmen who
Rather they are those laborers have to plan for their future mar-
who do not have the verbal skills, kets.
aptitude, or personal habits neces- It will also guide the local gov-
sary to hold any type of job, he ernment both in planning the pub-
said.rlic services and residential areas
Drop-Outs for this addition to the city's pop-
Generally these people are high ulation, as well as in training the
school drop-outs. Though the na- existing surplus labor force for
tional percentage of high school positions.
drop-outs has remained stable at
about 40 per cent for a number of
years, industry's skill requirementsA4
have been upped considerably. cross
Thus, unless the nation can find
some method to increase the skills 171
of high school drop-outs, the num-
ampus
ber of them who become hard core
unemployed will continue to in-
crease, Prof. Odiorne said. 1 The Stanley Quartet, composed

a
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LESTER

I

F LATT
EARL
SCRUGGS
and the
FOGGY MOUNTAIN BOYS
SAT., NOV. 16-8:30 P.M.
ANN ARBOR HIGH
All seats reserved
Tickets 3.50, 2.75, 2.00, 1.75
tickets on sale at the
Disc Shop, 1210 S. Univ. and
Record Center, 304 S. Thayer

Ann Arbor has 450 hard core un-
employed registered at the unem-
ployment agency with probably, at
least half as many more who have
not reported their status, he said.a
Not Victims3
The evidence that these workers1
are not victims of forces broader
than their personal inadequacies
is conclusive as Ann Arbor is an
over-employed city, and Washte-+
naw County is one of the two af-
fluent counties of the state. "There
are even unskilled jobs in the city
for these people if they couldl
meet the requirements," he ob-
served.
The problem is not limited to
Ann Arbor. Prof. Odiorne men-
tioned that Prof. W. Allen of the
business administration school and1
Dean William Haber of the liter-
ary college had jointly found'
about 30,000 hard core unemployed
in the 16-21 year old age bracket
in Detroit.
The New York Times recently
estimated that there were 200,000x
in this category in New York City.
These' people will not be affected
by the proposed tax cut if it is
enacted, as they are incapable of
filling the new jobs that will be
created, Prof. Odiorne said.
Investigation
In order to investigate the spe-
cific conditions of the hard core
unemployed, Prof. Odiorne said
that he was requesting a grant
from Gov. George Romney's Eco-
nomic Development and Research
Fund. He felt the expected find-
ings would suggest specific de-
BILLIARD ROOM
MICHIGAN UNION
10:30 A.M.-10:30 P.M. Daily
Sorry girls-men only

of Prof. Gilbert Ross, violin; Prof.
Gustave Rosseels, violin; Prof
Robert Courte, viola and Prof.
Jerome Jelinek, cello, all of the
music school, will perform in the
Rackham Memorial Bldg. in De-
troit at 8 p.m. today.
Scientific Revolution*.. .
Prof. John Bardach of the zo-
ology department will hold a sem-
inar concerning C. P. Snow's essay,
"The Two Cultures and the
Scientific Revolution," at 7:30
p.m. today in lounge four of Mark-
ley Hall.
Electronic Music . .
Wayne Slawson of Harvard Uni-
versity will speak on "Electronic
Music, Psychoacoustics and Com-
puters" at 4:15 p.m. today in Lane
Hall Aud.
Hichiganensian ..
The 1964 Michiganensian will
go on advance sale today, tomor-
row and Thursday in the Fish-
bowl. This year's Ensian will be
sold for $5 and will include a
supplement of 100 pages.

343 S. Dearborn
Chicago, Ill.

5706 S. University
Chicago, 1ll.

631 E. Green St.
Champaigne, 1ll.

, i

This advertisement is neither an offer to sell
nor a 'solicitation of an offer to buy any of
these securities. The offering is made oniy
by the prospectus.
IU.S.N.S.A. Co-Operative, Inc.
5,000 common, par value $5.00
7,500 preferred-A, par value $10.00
2,000 preferred-B, par value $100.00
COPIES OF THE PROSPECTUS MAY BE OBTAINED AT

333 Nickels Arcade
Ann Arbor, Mich.

INCORPORATED STATE OF WISCONSIN 1961
Order Your Subscription Today-
Phone NO 2-3241

3457 Chestnut St.
Phila., Penn.

w!

D o ~ tIde ,

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---_- --_----=,ii
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MUSKET is giving a play by Sandy Wilson November 6, 7, 8, and 9
MUSKET'S play is called "THE BOY FRIEND" and it is a
musical comedy of the 1920's

-

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TICKETS
AVA ILAB LE

on the

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Thursday

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PRICES:
Wednesday Night

.

Saturday Afternoon
$1.75

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and
at Lydia Mendelssohn
Box office
Monday th ru Thursday

Friday

Night

Li

$2.00
Saturday Night

III

In

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