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October 26, 1963 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Nerni Asks Socialist Party
To Break Communist Ties

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:
Rickover Asks More Reforms

1_

Various Critics Attack
Kelley Housing Ruling
By RAYMOND HOLTON
Attorney General Frank Kelley's recent ruling against city ordi-
nances on fair housing has drawn comment from city attorney Jacob
Fahrner, University professors and the Michigan chapter of the
American Civil Liberties Union.
All sources said Kelley's rul Ng is not binding on local units of
government.
"If the proposition that the constitution fully occupies the civil
rights field to the exclusion of cities were to have the force of law, it
could only reach that status by a court decision," Fahrner said. "The

ignore GOP
SRigs Plan
WASHINGTON ()-A Republi-
can proposal aimed at obtaining a
breakthrough on civil rights legis-
lation stirred little interest among
IDemocrats yesterday.
The administration declined
even to acknowledge there was
such a thing, although one of its
GOP sponsors insisted both the
White House and the Justice De-
partnient had been made aware of
it.
Among Democrats on the House
Judiciary Committee, where the
fight over a bill is building up to
a climax, there were suspicions of
a political trap.
The proposal, advanced Thurs-
day by some Republican judiciary
committee members, calls for
President John F. Kennedy to em-
brace a GOP bill and offer it as a
"harmony" measure.
The Republicans also want Ken-
nedy to make a public announce-
ment crediting the GOP with au-
thorship of the bill.
Despite its obvious political
overtones the proposal calls for a
legislative package that closely
parallels what the administration
is seeking.
It would cover voting rights,
public accommodations, school de-
segregation, federal intervention
in civil rights cases, and creation
of a community relations service
to mediate racial disputes. Only
the latter provision would be taken
bodily from the administration's
bill.
Rep. Clark MacGregor (R-
Minn), who helped draw up the
proposal, said it was not offered
on a take-it-or-leave-it basis, but
as something on which negotia-
tions can be based..

attorney general cannot Just give
an opinion which carries the force
of law so far as city ordinances are
concerned," he added.
Fahrner is presently making a
detailed study which he plans to
submit to the City Councir when
it meets to make a final decision
on whether the fair housing ordi-
nance will take effect.
Bipartisan Commission
Michigan's new constitution es-
tablishes a bipartisan civil rights
commission. Its members have
been appointed by Gov. George
Romney and will officially take of-
fice Jan. 1, the same date Ann Ar-
bor's ordinance is scheduled to
take effect.
Prof. Robert J. Harris of the
Law School said recently that the
ruling would have crippling re-
sults if followed by the courts.
"It would prevent the state from
passing legislation permitting vic-
tims of discrimination to go to
court for damages or injunctive
relief," he said.
He also claimed that it would
invalidate the existing state leg-
islation concerning public accom-
modations and fair employment
practices.
Prof. Harris criticized the Kel-
ley ruling for "resting solely on
two irrelevant cases" and for "ig-
noring the conventional rules for
accommodating regulations of the
same subject matter by two sov
ereignties."
ACLU Opposes Kelley
The ACLU recently announced
its opposition to Kelley's ruling,
urging "municipalities of the state
which have already adopted open
housing ordinances to keep them
intact."
The statement continued, that
"until the rules of the civil rights
commission actually supersede
such local requirements, our or-
ganization is prepared to defend
in the courts any legislation,
whether on the state, county or
municipal level, which appropri-
ately extends the guarantees of
equality to all."

Italian Leader
Urges Coalition
With Centrists
ROME (P) - Pietro Nenni told
his Marxist Socialist Party last
night to support NATO, leave the
Communists behind once and for
all and accept cabinet posts in a
new Center-Left government with
the Christian Democrat Catholic
Party.
In a ringing two-hour address
opening a five-day national party
congress, the 72-year-old Socialist
leader called for a fateful 1arty
decision to turn'Italian politics in-
to an historic new course.
Seated before him' were 600 par-
ty delegates, many still determined
to continue the party's old working
ties with the Communists.
Before the Congress ends, the
pro-Red faction ,will appeal to the
party to reject Nenni's course and
refuse further cooperation with
the Christian Democrats.
Old Sympathies
The pro-Reds will play on the
Socialists' Marxist sentiments. The
Socialists still wave red sickle and
hammer banners and sing the "In-
ternationale," despite cooperation
with the Centrist parties.
Communists made big gains and
the Christian Democrats suffered
sharp losses in the national elec-
tion last April.
Nenni told his party not only to
lend voting support to the next
Center-Left attempt, but to join
as full cabinet partners.
It was a major turnabout for the
aging Socialist firebrand, who once
won a Stalin Peace Prize. He had
been Italy's foreign minister in
1947, but then joined the Commu-
nists in opposition to the line of
governments that followed.
Disillusion Sets In
Nenni soured on the Commu-
nists starting with the Soviet sup-
*pression of the 1956 Hungarian re-
volt. In recent months he has re-
jected Communist pleas for re-
newed cooperation, denouncing the
Communists as offering no solu-
tion for Italy's problems.
Most predictions were that Nen-
ni would win his fight with his
dissident Left wing. A major ques-
tion was whether he would score a
big enough victory to increase his
bargaining position in negotiations
for a new government.
The nation is awaiting the out-
come of the congress to end Italy's
six-month political crisis. Pre-
mier Giovanni Leone has been
governing with a minority cabinet
pending the outcome. He is expect-
ed to resign early next month.

OFFERS REASSURANCES-West German Chancellor Ludwig Er-
hard (right) greets U.S. Secretary of State Dean Rusk in Bonn.
Rusk flew to Germany with the pledge that the United States
would not withdraw any of its 250,000 troops stationed there.
:Fears Ease in Germany
Over U.S. Troop Pull-Out
BONN (P)--West Germany relaxed somewhat yesterday on the
issue of United States troop strength in Germany after receiving reas-
surances from two high United States officials.
Late in the day, Secretary of State Dean Rusk expressed high
satisfaction with his first round of talks with West German leaders
aimed at dispelling their fears about the maintenance of United States
military strength.
Rusk met with the new chancellor, Ludwig Erhard, former Chan-
cellor Konrad Adenauer and Defense Minister Kai-Uwe Von Hassel.

By G. K. HODENFIELD
Associated Press Education Writer
WASHINGTON-Vice Adm. H.
G. Rickover, a hardy perennial
among education critics, said yes-
terday recent reforms in the pub-
lic schools have barely scratched
the surface of the problem.
"It is true," he said, "that un-
der outside pressure, curricula-
especially for the college prepara-
tory course-are being toughened
here and there, and various new
gimmicks are being tried out, but
I venture to say that only one stu-
dent in a thousand has so far been
affected by any serious reform.
"The life-adjustment people are
still in the saddle."
Rickover, in a speech to the an-
nual meeting of the Council for
Basic Education, aimed his sharp-
est barbs at what he called "the
snail's pace, the incredible stretch-
out, in American education."
Better Education in Europe
"The plain fact is," he said,
"that the educational value of a
school year is at least a third high-
er [in European countries] than
here. Our children sit in class more
years because they learn less each
year."
Another speaker, Supt. William
H. Cornog of New Trier Township
High School, Winnetka, Ill., told
the Council that "degrading edu-
cation courses have kept more
good minds out of public school
teaching than has low pay.

"In the past, the intellectual dis-
repute and the actual gross inept-
ness and boredom of courses in
education have acted as an effec-
tive bar to many of intelligence
and integrity who contemplated
going into public school teaching,"
Cornog said in his address.
Education Courses Degrading
"Men and women of good will
and high endowment have often
been unwilling to endure the hu-
miliation of acquiring 'education'
credits in order to practice a pro-
fession to which they felt they
wanted to dedicate their lives.
"I am saying simply that on
the national scale what is available
UN Observers
Visit Pagodas
SAIGON (P)-A United Nations
fact-finding team visited two gov-
ernment-controlled Buddhist pa-
godas in Saigon yesterday in an
attempt to probe charges of reli-
gious persecution in South Viet
Nam.
The investigators saw no lead-
ers of the Buddhist opposition to
President Ngo Dinh Diem, all of
whom were arrested in a military
crackdown on pagodas Aug. 21.
They talked to a few government-
screened monks, but only in the
presence of Vietnamese officials.

and possible in the best schools
should be available and possible in
all schools."
Rickover said that because of
the superiority of European edu-
cation, "it is . .. not surprising
that Europe has a shortage oA
unskilled workers and must im-'
port foreigners to do common la-
bor. In contrast we have a surplus:
we have a mass of young people
so deficient in mental and manual
skills that no advanced society
could provide them all with jobs,
except on a charity basis."
CHRISTIAN WORSHIP
IS DISCUSSED
BY NORTHSIDE PRE
Christian worship is essen-
tially a review of the theologi-
cal scene in which the Church
was established. This review
simultaneously provides direc-
tion for personal religious ex-
perience within the community
of the redeemed. In worship,
the Church acknowledges God
as the all-knowing, all-power-
ful Creator, perfect in holiness
and goodness. In'contrast, the
Church -,and the individual
within--confesses. its own de-
pendency; imperfection, and
sinfulness. In the next step, the
Church re-affirms the Gospel,
God's provision of Redemption
from the terrible predicament.
Finally, the Church offers itself
to serve God's good purposes,
deeply grateful that God ac-
cepts it, and that God's accept-
ance gives it renewed life.
Is worship an individual or a
corporate concern? Is worship
significant only in terms of
personal religious experience, or
does it have practical value for
the Church in maintaining its
identity as the community of
the redeemed?
While questions such as those
indicated -above are being dis-
cussed in next Sunday's "Con-
cern Period" at Northside Pres-
byterian /Church, children will
be learning significant details
in the theological scene in Sun-
day School classes held simul-
taneously with the ,-Church
Service. 10:45 a.m. Sunday is
the time, and the Phi Chi Fra-
ternity, 2250 Fuller Road is the
place. Readers who cannot
bring children are urged to
come anyway.

How would you like to win a
free dinner for you and your date
AT___
The Michigan Union is looking for a new name
for its dining room and it needs your help.

y

SWorld News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
VATICAN CITY-The Vatican
Ecumenical Council e n d o r s e d
moves yesterday to give the world
a perpetual calendar and a fixed
date for Easter.
WASHINGTON-Defense Secre-
tary Robert S. McNamara turned
down yesterday the Navy's re-
quest for atomic power in its new
carrier, ordering instead that the
ship use conventional power. He
said he did this to avoid further
delay in building the ship and said
that his action does not prejudge
another question of nuclear power
for Navy service ships in the fu-
ture.
NEW YORK-President Josip
Tito of Yugoslavia sailed for home
yesterday on a luxury liner that
was delayed 40 minutes by a bomb
scare. The incident climaxed a
hectic week in which New York
police were belittled for their se-
curity efforts on behalf of the
Communist leader.
*1 * *K
NEW DELHI-India told Paki-
stan yesterday any attempt by
forces of the Pakistan-controlled
portion of Kashmir to cross the
Kashmir cease-fire line would
compel India "to exercise the right
of self-defense."
SALISBURY, Southern Rhode-
sia-Prime Minister Winston Field
of Southern Rhodesia announced
yesterday he will renew demands
for Southern Rhodesia's- inde-
pendence. He said he intends to
ask the British government to re-
open "urgent discussions"~ on the
subject.
LONDON-Cheddi Jagan, prime
minister of British Guiana and the
leaders of the-two opposition par-
ties in the South American colony
have told Britain they are unable
to agree on the road to independ-
ence. They asked the British gov-
ernment to decide major consti-
tutional issues andsaid they would
accept the government's decision.
LOS ANGELES-Adlai Steven-
son said yesterday United Nations
forces may have to remain in the
Congo beyond the six-month ex-
tension granted by the General
Assembly.
MOSCOW - Foreign Minister
Andrei A. Gromyko issued a con-
ciliatory statement last night on
the value of his recent talks in
the United States. This contrasted
with the pessimistic statement he
made last week at Prestwick, Scot-
land, while returning from the
United States.
Last night's statement sounded
as if it had been issued to over-
come puzzlement and pessimism
generated among Western diplo-
mats last week.
COMRIE, Perthshire, Scotland-
Cheered by well-wishers who lined
the roads to see him, Britain's
Prime Minister Sir Alec Douglas-
Home arrived here last night to
launch his campaign for a House
of Commons seat in a special elec-
tion Nov. 7.
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THE

Cr H IJCi
SAB~tr BAmTH

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST.CHURCH
Meeting in the Ann Arbor Y.M.-Y.W.C.A
at 5th and Williams
Rev. Jesse Northweather, Pastor
Phone 668-9894
SUNDAY-
9:45 a. m. Sunday School.
1 :00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m. Training Union.
7:30 p.m. Evening Worship.

"The secretary flew here from
Washington yesterday morning to
reassure the West German govern-I
ment. Its leaders feared that exer-
cise Big Lift--transport by plane
of the whole United States 2nd
Armored Division from Texas-
would be used to justify a reduc-
tion in the number of troops the
United States maintains in this
and other European countries.
West German sources indicated
they are looking to .Rusk person-
ally to resolve their last doubts
about the troops issue. They said
his Frankfurt speech would pro-
vide the right kind of occasion.
Before Rusk saw Erhard, the
United States took the worst of
the strain off United States-West
German relations with . a state-
ment made in Frankfurt by Sec-
retary of the Army Cyrus Vance.

All you need to do is to send your suggestion to:
DINING ROOM

CHRiSTMAS FLIGHT to EUROPE
$339 ROUND TRIP
NEW YORK to PARIS Dec. 22
PARIS to NEW YORK Jan. 12
22 DAYS IN EUROPE
Call: Mr. K. Hans Mr. J. Shurmon
NO 5-8394 NO 8-7720
Absolute Deadline - November 21

STUDENT OFFICES
MICHIGAN UNION

CONTEST CLOSES NOV. 11
Sorry! No Union personnel allowed.

P~rai e for

"SCAPIN" and
"PHOENIX"

THE ANN ARBOR NEWS

APA Twin Bill

'Sheer Delight'.

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BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Meeting'in Room 528D
in basement of S.A.B.
Monday-7:00 to 8:00 p.m. Bible Study.
Thursday-5:10 to 5:40 p.m. Vesper Service.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave,
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 A.M. and 12 Noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
.Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 and 512 E. Huron-663-9376
Rev. James H. Middleton-Senior Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light-Campus Minister
Mr. David Backus--Student Intern
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Class, "The Diversity of
the Bible."
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
7:30 p.m. Choir Presentation of Baroque
Music, First Baptist Church.
Monday, 12:00 to '1:00 p.m. Luncheon,
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister-
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all services--
Call NO 2-2756
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY-
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Worship Services.
4:00 p.m. Bible Study.
6:00 p.m. Supper and Program. Sharon Raft-
stol-Slides from Luthern Summer Euro-
pean Study Project.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m. Vespers.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
SERVICES at 9:30 and 11:15 a.m. "A Church
on the Move"-Laymen's Sunday.
BIBLE LECTURE at 10:30 a.m. The Reverend
Raymond Barstow.
CHURCH SCHOOL: all ages, 9:30 and 11:15
a .m.
STUDENT GUILD, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-
5 189.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1017 Wi .n- Ave

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets ,
Minister-Hoover Rupert
Campus Minister-Eugene Ransom
Associate Campus Minister-Jean Robe
SUNDAY
Morning Worshi pat 9:00 and 1 1:15S a~m.
"Any Late News From God?"-Dr. Rupert.
10:15 a .m.-Student Seminar, Methodist Social
Creed, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Old Fash-
ioned Song Fest.
TUESDAY
8:30-1 1:00 p.m.--Open House, Miss Robe's
apartment. .
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by Breakfast.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Supper in the
Pine Room; "Religion in the Nuclear Age
-New Things in Science,'" Dr. Lawrence
Oncley. Phone 8-6881 forreservations.
NEXT SUNDAY
Bishop James K. Mathews will preach under
the Henry Martin Loud Lectureship. He
will also speak at the evening program.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
John Koenig, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m. Worship
Services, "in Defense of the Faith," Refor-
mation Sunday.
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m. Bible study
groups.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m. Gamma Delta Supper.
Sunday at 7:00 p.m., Reformation Sunday
Choral Vesper Service, featuring the Chapel
Choir.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m. Reformation Eve
Vespers.

I
.4
'1
4
.4
.4

By Ted Rancont, Jr.
(News Drama Critie
"Phoenix" and "Scapin" are an
evening of sheer delight.
Without a message and with-
out a care for literary crusading,
the fun-loving APA respected
both by making its tworclassics
classically uproarious.
Laughter chased the 20th cen-
tury away, and we all waved it
an impish adieu as we tripped
lightly into Fry's Roman tomb
and Moliere's Gallicized Naples
imnly a nmirvtoPinvm rm_

amusement that alternated from
sly sophistic digs to slapstick and
back again like lightning.
An exquisite sparseness in the
touch of director Stephen Porter
complemented the vigor of the
three players to make the whole
a robusetly restrained gem of
slightly earth-colored fun that
left us wanting more.
Changing his mood completely
in the second half of the pro-
gram, Porter gave "Scapin" a
reading broad enough to have

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service.
0 -'n nn.: 10 -A n ..... ora es n

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
For Transportation Call 2-2756
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.

A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty. Reading room hours are 10.00
A.M. to 5:00 P.M. doily, except Sunday
and Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00 P.M.

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