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October 26, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-26

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THE MICHIGAN 'DAILY SATURDAY. OCTOBER 26, 1963

Hatcher Asks New Partnership

Sawyer Cites Shortage
Of Science Personnel

SOUTHEAST ASIA:
I Watt Views New Position of Australia

In return, President Hatcher
believes industry should "invest in
research-oriented staffs of their
own, bring its technology up to
date and be eager to learn and
explore new ways of doing things."
Trained Workers
Cooperation with educational
institutions can enable industry to
easily do so, he claimed, because
universities provide new graduates
every year who are already re-
search-minded because of their
training.
President Hatcher commented
that "their training is indirectly
a part of what you pay for when
you sponsor research on a univer-
sity campus."
He also described some of the
efforts of the University to com-
bat the problem on intellectual
obsolescence caused by the rapid
change occuring in all industrial
and professional fields.
'U' Efforts
"Subscribers to the industry
program of the engineering col-
lege receive abstracts of scientiilf
papers, invitations to campus con-
ferences and special lectures ar-
ranged at company locations and
conducted by faculty," President
Hatcher said.
In an agreement with one Mich-
igan company, the University pro-
vides six weeks of concentrated
instruction on campus and six
months of one-a-week seminars
at the company location to en-
gineers who have not been able to
keep up with progress in their
fields.
"To contribute toward an ef-
fective partnership with industry
at the University, the Institute of
Science and Technology sends bul-
letins to companies and helps to
find the right man or organization
for an inquiring industry," Presi-
dent Hatcher commented.
There have been many examples
of the inter-relationship of uni-
versity research and the develop-
ment of new industrial products.
"A new product or process may be
the result, or the necessary means'
toward the universities' goal of
gaining new knowledge," he ex-
plained.

Special To The Daily
CHICAGO - "Even though the
number of youths going to college
will increase sharply in the years
just ahead, the scientific person-
nel problem will become more ag-
gravated," Vice-President for Re-
search Ralph A. Sawyer said yes-
terday.
Speaking before the American
Optical Society meeting here, he
accepted the society's Ives Medal
for his work in spectroscopy.
"The problem of scientific man-
power will be aggravated for two
reasons," he indicated.
"One is the simple and direct
fact that the large increase in
college enrollment calls for cor-
responding increases in college
faculties.
"The other reason is the rapid
growth of research and develop-
ment expenditures, both by the
government and by private indus-
try," he added.
He pointed out that the rate of
increase in research spending has
been about 15 per cent per year
since World War II, doubling
every five years under the stimu-
lation of needed new developments
in space and defense areas.
Quoting the President's Scien-
tific Advisory Committee to show
the need for increased scientific
and technical manpower he said:
"The output of doctorates in
these fields should be increased
by 150 per cent in the decade of
the sixties in comparison with a 50
per cent increase in the fifties."
He noted that the problem is
basically financial and that more
funds will be required to support
graduate students, to pay for addi-
tional educational costs and for
construction and renovation of
laboratory and teaching facilities
and research equipments
'UT' To Install
Centrex Phones
Work will begin Monday on
consolidation of the 10,400 tele-
phones of the University into a
single system, called Centrex.
Various sidewalks around cam-
pus will be torn up.

RALPH SAWYER
... personnel problems
STUDY:
AlumniGroup
To Evaluate
Law School
(Continued from Page 1)
of the opportunities for engaging
in legal aid work.
"Exploitation of the resources
of state and local bar associations
as well as the use of strategically
located alumni may be helpful in
enlarging the (placement) pro-
gram," the committee report stat-
ed. Although no formal expansion
of the placement bureau hastaken
place, there was an increase in
placements made last year.
Concerning committee - recom-
mendations, Dean Proffitt com-
mented, "Some of their ideas may
be good, but if we don't have the
money we obviously can't put
them into effect."
Today's committee schedule in-
cludes meetings with law students,
further attendance of classes and
conferences with faculty. In ad-
dition, committee members will
have free hours to investigate
areas of particular concern to
them. They will have an opportun-
ity to contact persons with which
they may have wished to discuss
the Law School, but whom they
have not met in the formal pro-
gram, Dean Proffitt said.

By JOHN WEILER
Australia's position toward the
Southeast Asian area has changed
considerably since World War II,
Sir Alan Watt of the Australian
National University said yester-
day.
Watt, who was formerly with the
Australian government but is now
a visiting fellow at the Depart-
ment of International Relations at
the University, said that the
change has been one from com-
parative isolation to "identifiable
presence of Australia in the South-
east Asian area."
He said that although Australia
has inherited European cultures
and British parliamentary tradi-
tions by nature of its location on
the "southeast rim of Asia," Aus-
tralia has a more important geo-
graphic stake -in the actions of
Asian countries.
Watt said the prime minister
once summed it up as "what Great
Britain calls Far East, we call
Near North."
World War II
While before World War II the
Australians had no diplomatic of-
fices in foreign countries they es,-
tablished three soon after war
broke out.
The aftermath of Pearl Harbor,
the fear of invasion and the fall of
Singapore caused drastic changes
in Australian attitudes, Watt add-
ed.
"As the invasion fears died down
Federalists
To Convene
Mrs. Marion McVitty will speak
on "Can the United Nations
Weather the Winds of Change?'
at the Friends Meeting House,
1420 Hill Street at 10 tonight, at
at the regional fall conference of
the United World Federalists.
Others speaking at the con-
ference are Mr. William Bathea
National Director of the United
World Federalists; Mrs. Judy Rey-
nolds, member of the Executive
Council of the United World Fed-
eralists; and Walter H. Grossfeld,
Chairman of the Detroit chapter.
Mrs. McVitty is editor of "The
Independent Observer," and an
observerat the United Nations for
the World Association of Fed-
eralists.
Admission to the conference will
be one dollar for adults, students
free.

after Midway, Australians wanted
a larger part in the post-war
settlement." he said.
The dilemma that has faced
Australia since the war has been
one of the difficulties in reconcil-
ing military security and peaceful
relations, Watt said.
One possibility for establishing
good relations has been the Aus-
tralian universities and other edu-
cational institutions who have al-
Students Protest
Poor Facilities
CALCUTTA - Post-graduate
students at the University of Cal-
cutta have submitted a petition
to the vice-chancellor calling for
reforms of the overcrowded eat-
ing facilities, absence of open ref-
erence shelves in the library and
infrequent tutorial classes.

lowed Asian students to attend.
This has helped to break down a
portion of the isolation formerly
held.
Problem Areas
Watt cited Indonesia as one ex-
ample of a problem area to the
Australians. Australia has contin-
ually supported the new state of
Malaysia while Indonesia has op-
posed it.
Watt said that serious consider-
ation should be given to the speech
given by President Sukarno of In-
donesia on August 17. He char-
acterized the address under four
headings: national revolution, per-
manent revolution, aid to the
"newly emergent" forces outside
Indonesia and a continuous con-
frontation.
"I take these statements seri-
ously," Watt said. ''It is reasonable
to regard the process of de-coloni-
zation in establishing Malaysia as
a good one but not a perfect one."

ANN ARBOR'S
10-SPEED BICYCLE
HEADQUARTERS
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Cinema Guild-Renoir's "Rules of the
Game," and W. C. Fields in "The Great
Chase": Architecture Aud., 7:00 p.m.
and 9:00 p.m.
General Notices_
Freshman Class Elections-October 28,
1963, 3:30-4:30. Room M7330 Medical
Science Building.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
Young Americans for Freedom, Mem-
bership Meeting, Oct. 31, 8 p.m., Union.
Voice and Office of Religious Affairs,
Rev. Malcolm Boyd, Dramatic Readings,
Nov. 6, 8 p.m., Aud. A Angell Hall.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Univ. of Denver & The Social Science
Foundation announce graduate fellow-
ships for 1964-65 for the study of Inter-
national Relations leading to the MA
& PhD degrees. Fellowships range from
part-tuition to $2,500. Must apply by
Feb. 15.
Indiana Univ., Bloomington, Ind. --
Announcing Graduate Internships in
Student Personnel Admin. & Resident
Assistantships for grad students in
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

WAWOMW j

other academic areas. Posittcns provide
room, board & remission of basic tui-
tion fees. Cash stipends based upon re-
sponsibilities assumed. File applications
as early as possible.
Teachers College, Columbia Univ., NYC
Announcing 5th year MA degree pro-
grams for graduates of Liberal Arts col-
leges. Special preservice programs com-
bining certification & MA degree re-
quirements in various teaching fields.
Graduates without any previous educ.
courses may expect to complete this
prog. in 2 terms & a summer session.
Student teaching is part of these special
preservice programs.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Rohm & Haas Co., Philadelphia, Pa.-
Various openings for those with BS/MS
in Chem; BS/MS in Chem. Engrg.; BS
in Physics & BS in Textile Engrg.
City of Oshkosh, Wisc.-Seeking grad-
in field of forestry. Position involves
the management & administration of
Gemco Electric Co., Detroit, Mich. --
the city tree maintenance program.
Opening for Electrical Engnr. for Res.
(Continued on Page 5)

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DIAL 8-6416
H ELD OVER

I

"THE MOST REFRESHING MOVIE
GAIETY IN TOWN!
LESLIE CARONin THE LAUGHTER IS
} = CONTINUOUS, SLY
AND HEARTY! "
-A lon Cook, World Telegram
3osto DA MoN G .a AZNvouR

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Unitarian Student Group, Oct. 27, 7:30
"A bittersweet extravaganza p.m., Unitarian Church. Speaker: Dr.
E. Golde, "Ministering to Unitarians."
of euotIonallsm...
endleCongregational Disciples, E & R,
y uOSu suggesive EUB Student Guild, Oct.,27, 9:30 a.m.,
-Newsweek Guild House, 802 Monroe, Rev. J. Edgar
"Interpretation of the Bible."
Edwards, Campus minister, Seminar:
You Are Invited to enjoy dinner to-
gether with U.S. and International stu-
dents and visitors from other coun-
tries, 7 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 27, at the
Catholic Center, 331 Thompson St. For
tickets-cost $1.00-call 665-5645.
WOLVERINE CLUB PRESENTS
Student Air Charters
to NEW YORK
W*UNITED AIRLINES
"THANKSGIVING VACATION"
Leave Nov. 27........ ...................ReturnDec. 1
"CHRISTMAS VACATION"
FIt. No. 1-Leave Dec. 20............... . . Return Jan. 12
Fit. No. 2-Leave Dec. 21 .......... . ...Return Jan. 12

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