100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 25, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1963

)UNCIL MEETING:
Sigrman Tells SGC
Pilot Project Aims

PTP Presents Two Comedies

By MARY LOU BUTCHER
The literary college Pilot Project
vas devised "to try to improve
he intellectual atmosphere in the
esidence hall and to increase
nterest in learning," Herbert Sig-
nan, Grad, coordinator for the
>roject, told Student Government
-ouncil members at their meeting
Wednesday.
The project, involving freshmen
iving in Greene and Hinsdale
-ouse in East Quadrangle and
Departments'
Requirements
Vary on Test
By-ALAN Z. SIULMAN
The Graduate Record Examina-
ion, to be given Nov. 16 and at
rarious other times throughout
he academic year, is not a gen-
ral University requirement for
dmission to the graduate school.
Following a format almost iden-
ical with that of the Scholastic
kptitude Tests given to entering
undergraduates, the GRE consists
f an aptitude test which measures
eneral verbal and quantitative
kills and an advanced test which
mphasizes comprehension of the
>asic materials in the student's
)roposed graduate major.
Requirements
However, individual departments
vithin the school can superimpose
additional requirements on the
Jniversity's minimum admission
tandards, particularly when han-
iling borderline cases. The Grad-
uate Record Examination is one
uch requirement.
Commenting on the relative im-
>ortance of the GRE in selecting
tudents for graduate work, Prof.
rohn E. Milholland of the Psy-
hQlogy department, and chief of
he Evaluation and Examination
Division of the Institute of Hu-
nan Adjustment said, "If it is
available, it is used as an item of
nformation along with the under-
;raduate record, teacher recom-
nendations and any work or re-
earch done with faculty mem-
ters. It is only one aspect of the
admissions system.
"One advantage of the GRE is
hat it gives the Graduate School
a common denominator in evalu-
ating students who come from
different. undergraduate colleges"

Little House in Mary Markley
Hall, seeks to unite the social and
academic process as closely as pos-
sible, Sigman said.
There are 150 participants in
the project, who are encouraged
to elect common sections in their
freshmen courses.
Relationship
Although the project is only in
its second year, a "definite rela-
tion between learning and social
contacts has been found," he noted.
Another effect of the project has
been to increase student-faculty
contact on an informal basis.
"The major concern of the proj-
ect is to discover in what ways
the classroom and the living unit
can be related to make a more
valuable living experience," Sig-
man said.
The success of the Pilot Project
may well influence the University's
plans to construct residence halls
on North Campus.
Presently the planning commit-
tee for the project, consisting of
John Taylor, director of East
Quadrangle; John Pyper, director
of Mary Markley Hall; three stu-
dents representing each of the
houses involved; and Sigman, as
an ex-officio member, is engaged
in assessing the value of the proj-
ect.
SGC Approval
Student Government Council
approved a motion submitted by
Michael Knapp, '64, that Council
request the opportunity to appoint
an additional memberhnot involv-
ed in the project to the planning
committee.
Knapp noted that it is impor-
tant to obtain the views of a per-
son not involved in the living
atmosphere of the houses partici-
pating in the project.
Executive Vice-President Thom-
as Smithson, '65, noted that "this
project can have an influence on
the ongoing education of the Uni-
versity. It can encourage the ex-
pansion and growth of the Univer-
sity."
Daily Editor Ronald Wilton, '64,
pointed out that "the philosophy
behind this project is so broad
that it could have important ram-
ifications for the University and
higher education throughout the
oountry."
Submit Report
Sigman noted that he would
take Council's request to the plan-
ning committee and report on its
decision as soon as possible.
In other action taken at the
meeting, Council approved the ap-
pointments of the following mem-
bers to the standing committees:
Student activities committee:
Scott Crooks, '65; Patrician El-
kins, '64; Curtis Huntington, '63;
Fred Rhines, '64.
Student concerns committee:
Gary Cunningham, '66; Gretchen
Groth, '64; Knapp; Elaine Resmer,
'64.
National Student Association
committee: Edwin Sasaki, Grad;
Raymond Rusnak, '64; Clifford
Taylor, '64.
University affairs: Charlene
Hager, '64; Howard Schechter, '66;
Wilton.
DIAL 2-6264
ENDING TODAY
"MONDO CANE"
Shown cft 1:05,
3, 5, 7 and 9

Ballet Group
To Initiate
'U' Program
The University Musical Society's
Chamber Dance Festival will take
place this weekend in Rackham
Aud.
The three-part festival will be
opened by the Marina Svetlova
Dance Ensemble at 8:30 p.m. to-
day. Miss Svetlova, a former bal-
lerina of the Ballet Russe de
Monte Carlo and prima ballerina
of the Metropolitan Opera, will
present a program of classical bal-
let. Among the pieces to be pre-
sented will be Chopin's "Les
Sylphides," Debussy's "Cake Walk"
and De Falla's "Farruca."
The second program will be
Shanta Rao and her company of
dancers and musicians from South
India at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow.
Shanta Rao, the leading dancer
of India, will present works rep-
resentative of three classical
styles of Indian dancingeas well
as examples of folk dance of the
Andhra State and Malabar Coast.
The final presentation in the
festival will be the Hungarian
Ballet's "Bihari," with Nora Ko-
vach and Istvan Rabovsky at 2:30
p.m. Sunday. The program will
be a mixture of the classical ballet
with the native dances of Hun-
gary, accompanied by a Gypsy
instrumental ensemble.
All of the members of the com-
pany are Hungarian artists- who
defected from Communist control.
The "Bihari" will include in its
program the national "Czardas"
and "Verbunkos" as well as two
full-length ballets.
Kovack and Rabovsky were stars
of the Budapest Opera Ballet and
Leningrad Ballet until their highly
publicized defection from Com-
munist Hungary in 1953.
A unique Hungarian instrument,
the cymbalum, a wirestrung in-
strument played with mallets, will
be heard in solo at the presenta-
tion. -

dffffl "I

HELD OV ER'
"FUN...SPICE AND IMAGINATION!"
LESLIE
CARON r FABLES
OF MOVE
ROSSANO BRAZZIMONIGAVIT CHARLEsAZNVOR

DIAL
8-6416

a'

COMI NG:

"THE FACE OF WAR"

SOPH SHOW'63,
"PAJAMA GAME"
Tickets Still Available For
Saturday Matinee-$1.50
BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY 12:30-5:00
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater

t

PERFORM "PHOENIX"-The Professional Theater Program presents Christopher Fry's "A Phoenix
Too Frequent" and Moliere's "Scapin" at 8:30 today at Trueblood Aud. The double bill is the second
program of the season for the PTP which is part of the Association of Producing Artists. "Phoe-
nix" and "Scapin" run the gamut of methods of humor, featuring both sophisticated comedy and
slapstick.
HIGHER EDUCATION:
Hatcb Defines College Standards

aid.

Work load

By JEFFREY GOODMAN
"With all the talk about rais-
ing standards in American schools
and colleges, not enough attention
has been given to the problem of
what these standards are," Wins-
low R. Hatch points out in a pam-
phlet "What Standards Do We
Raise?"
Hatch is director of the Clear-
inghouse of Studies on Higher Ed-
ucation for the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare.
The pamphlet was published this
year as part of the Office of Edu-
cation's "Dimensions in Higher
Education" series.
The firstsof the 21 standards
cited is a college's disposition to
involve students more extensively
in the acquisition of knowledge
and to involve faculty more ex-
tensively in its critical examina-
tion.
Basic Principle
The principle behind this stand-
ard is that the personal inter-
cession of a teacher is not essen-
tial to the student's acquiring
knowledge. Teachers, on the other
hand, cannot afford merely to in-
struct; their function should be
an extension of, not a means to,
the acquisition of information.
Manifestations of this emphasis
are included in further standards
shown by Hatch. Quality is indi-
cated in colleges which are most
successful in involving their stu-
dents in independent study, in
which the teacher can devote his
time to "reinforcing, extending
and examining the information
acquired by the student."
Furthermore, colleges should
provide adequate learning and re-
source materials as an integral
cross
Camp us
Prof. Daniel Katz of the psy-
'chology dept. will speak at 12 noon
today in 5615 Haven Hall on "Who
Shall Speak for the APA."
New Look ...
Prof. Marcus Bach of the Uni-
versity of Iowa will speak on "A
New Look at Church Street U.S.A."
at 8 p.m. today at the YM-YWCA.
X-Ray Analysis . .
Prof. J. Monteath Robertson of
the University of Glasgow will
speak on "Application of X-Ray
Analysis to Alkoloid Structures"
at 8 p.m. today in Rm. 1300 Chem-
istry Bldg.

part of the curriculum. The col-!
lege should offer common or core
curricula, "b r i n g i n g together
courses and teachers that have
heretofore been kept apart in the
student's mind" which establishes
a more "solid curricular context"
for an individual's efforts.
In general, the quality school
will have a significant impact on
the formation of values and habits
in its students. It will be deliber-
ately permissive and flexible, em-
phasizing "clearly formulated and
jealously defended" policies on
academic freedom, informal rela-
tionships between teachers and
students and flexible course and
degree requirements.
A further standard is based on
the school "whose introductory
courses reflect a discriminating
scholarship and also exploit
uniqueness, the point being to
make the courses sufficiently

above high school courses in meth-
od and content to challenge stu-
dents."
Quality will also be indicated by
a school's willingness to recognize
and compensate effective teach-
ing. "Where good teaching is in-
sisted upon, it should be recog-
nized and adequately compensat-
ed," Hatch said.
Summarizing the student char-
acteristics correlated with these
institutional standards, Hatch
pointed to findings by the Center
for the Study of Higher Education
at the University of California,
Berkeley: "disposition to work in-
dependently and to like it, an in-
tellectual orientation, a liberal
outlook, an experimental non-
stereotyped cast of mind, sensitiv-
ity, flexibility, tolerance, a crea-
tive-artistic flair and a resistance
to leveling influences and to con-
formity for conformity's sake."

Order Your Daily Now-
'NO 2-34

LMIINOU S!
-Time Magazine,

{ _ _ _-

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill

"Students who score well on the
examinations have sufficient in-
telligence and ability to carry the
work load in graduate school,"
Prof. Milholland added.
He pointed out, however, that
there was no definitive correla-
tion between the student's per-
formance on the GRE and his
performance in graduate school.
"The correlation is positive but
it is not particularly large. It is
far from being an infallible pre-
dictor."

THEATRE HILLEL
ORGANIZATION MEETING
Sunday, Oct. 27, 4:30 P.M.
OPEN TO ALL INTERESTED
SUPPER CLUB
Serving Kosher Delicatessdn
Sundays at 5:30 P.M.
I .

Tickets may be available
at the door before each performance
7:00-8:0

4

STUDENTS & FACULTY
IN NEED OF A LAUGH?
CALL
662m8871
for Ciheina quild
PROGRAM INFORMATION

DIAL 5-6290
N
0
w
I

BRITAIN'S ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
BEST ACTRESS

STARTING

J[6"$3

1I

M t

Like most of us, you probably
feel pressured at times with the
demands made on you for original
thinking, -for fresh ideas that
will lift your work above the
commonplace. Through the stud*
of this book, Science and Health
with Key to the Scriptures by
Mary Baker Eddy, we are learn-
ing how to turn to God for the
intelligent ideas we need. You
can do this, too.
We invite you to come to our
meetings and to hear how we
are working out our problems
through applying the truths of
01* + QCl n

..t- ...~v v ..vv.. .n t -..n..r. . .... .. r . ... ... . .. . v ... ....-,.... .... .:...: .......... .... ...-r-. ........: .v-:.;..r..w:..... ::.::. 4 t1 .
- "SCAPIN" and
THE ANN ARBOR NEWS
APA Twin Bill
(New D ramaCritic amusement that alternated from
sly sophistic digs to slapstick and
"'Phoenix" and "Scapin" are an back again like lightning.
evening of sheer delight. An xust preesi h
hout a mcssr e for l iterrh-uaig touch of director Stephen Porter
teca funlie.AP crespecte complemented the vigor of the
bothic by mpaki is two classics three players tostmake the whole
Laughter chased thie 20th cen- slightly earth-colored fun that
anryimpish adieu as we trpped Changing his mood completely
lightly into Fry's Roman tomb in the second half of the pro-
and Moliere's Gallicized Naples gram, Porter gave "Scapin" a
simply and purely to enjoy our- reading broad enough to have
sent even Moliere into howling

0

"LES-LIE CARON
IS IMMENSELY AFFECTING.
I RECOMMEND THE PICTURE
TO EVERYONE."
-New Yorker Magazine
"Stunning performance!
Leslie Caron imbues it with
tremendous compassion
and charm.".
-New York Times
"A bittersweet extravaganza
of. emotionalism...
eudlessly suggestive."
-Newsweek
"Highest Rating:
Another film of award calibre.
New York Daily News

i I

A I

I

U --

I - I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan