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October 18, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER MOSS'

TIlE MIChIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1903
S S

OT ES WEAKNESSES:
Barlow Discusses Tax Reform

By STEVEN HALLER
"It is inconsistent to favor the
tax reform programs proposed by
former Governors G. Mennen Wil-
liams and John B. Swainson and
yet oppose the current proposal of
Gov. George Romney because
their programs are too similars"
Prof. Robin Barlow of the eco-
nomics department said recently.
Addressing the Young Demo-
crats on Romney's tax plan, Prof.
Barlow noted that Romney's pre-
decessors had also called for a
statewide income tax but had not
been successful in obtaining it.
Although t ey as Democrats were
hampered by working with a legis-
lative majority of Republicans, the
fact that Romney is a Republican
probably will not change matters
any, Prof. Barlow predicted.
He explained that the same "ul-
tras"--the extreme right wingers
-who had blocked passage of the
tax program before are still
around.
Good Features
Prof. Barlow noted that the pro-
gram as suggested by Romney has
many good features. The plan to
remove food and drugs from the
sales tax will lighten the tax bur-
den on low-income families.
However, the question of where
to draw the line on defining "food"
for taxation purposes presents an
obstacle to passage of this part of
the program, he, added.
The major weakness of the pro-
gram revolves around Romney's
suggested repeal of the business
activities tax. "This tax was vir-
tually foisted on -the Legislature,.
which didn't understand the de-
tails, by Ford and General Motors
lobbyists in 1953.i
"The tax has acquired academ-

ed services that a firm utilizes,
such as regulatory agencies and
health facilities, is the only legiti-
mate basis on which to consider
business tax liabilities. Business
taxes should be like insurance
premiums; every firm should pay
its share," he added.
Poor Prerequisite
The ability to pay is a"good
principle where individuals are
concerned, but it just doesn't
make sense at the business level.
"What basing the tax on this con-
cept amounts to is subsidizing in-
efficiency, and this is not in the
total social interest," Prof. Barlow
said.
He also noted the "illusion"
commonly held about the corpor-
ate profits tax that it reduces
business profits. Actually, it is
mostly "passed on to the consum-
er in the form of raised prices,"
he explained.
Another major inequity in Rom-
ney's plai is the fact that> the
"nuisance taxes" are not touched
at all. "This is just a case of the
strong-willed exploiting the weak-
willed. It constitutes discrimina-
tion against one group of tax-
payers or another on the basis of
their particular habits. There's no
logic to that," he commented.

KICKING UP ITS HEELS--The 75-member Bulgarian National
Ensemble, on its first tour of the United States, will appear at 8:30
p.m. today at Hill And. The program, directed by Philip Koutev,
will perform Bulgarian folk dances accompanied by native instru-
ments.
TroupeDance Director
Cites CreativityNeed

PROF. ROBIN BARLOW
... discusses tax proposals
ic popularity since that time,rbut
it has become unpopular among
businessmen and just about every-
one else except teachers of public
finance at universities," Prof.
Barlow noted.
Corporate Tax
The repeal of the business tax
would be accompanied by the im-
position of a 3.5 per cent tax on
corporate profits, but this is not
as reasonable, Prof. Barlow said.
He noted that he thought it
better to tax businesses on the
basis of the amount of govern-
ment-provided services they en-
joy, as would be true under the
business activities tax, than on the
basis of their ability to pay, as un-
der the corporate income tax.
"The amount of state-support-

College
Roundup
By CARL COHEN
UNIVERSITY PARK-Pennsyl-
vania State University has recent-
ly been granted $50 million to build
and endow a new medical school,
hospital and research center by
the Milton S. Hershey Foundation.
The grant is reportedly the larg-
est single private gift ever receiv-
ed by a public university.
* * *
NEW YORK - The Columbia
University chapter of Sigma Nu
fraternity last week requested a
waiver of the sections in its na-
tional constitution which bar Ne-
groes and Orientals from member-
ship. The fraternity, the last on
the campus subject to discrimina-
tory clauses, voted unanimously to
apply for the waiver to the Sigma
Nu High Council, its alumni board.
* * *
CHICAGO-The University of
Chicago, in its first public an-
nouncement of information con-
cerning faculty salaries in 60 years,
disclosed Friday that their aver-
age faculty salary, "including
fringe benefits," exceeds $15,000.
UNIVERSITY, Ala.-The Uni-
versity of Alabama has modified
its oath which had prohibited all
students from writing for news
media on matters expressly con-
cerning race relations. The admin-
istration announced that the new
restriction only prohibits students
from writing about Negro students
on the Alabama campus or from
discussing Negro applicants to the
University.
A university spokesman said the
change was made because, "the
greatest period of racial danger for
the university is past."
* * *
CHAPEL HILL--In a special
session last Thursday, the student
legislature of the University of
North Carolina unanimously pass-
ed a resolution voicing opposition
to the school's "controversial"
speaker ban law.
*, * *
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. - The
student council ofSpringfield Col-
lege passed a motion prohibiting
the sale of cigarettes on campus.
The motion now goes to the stu-
dent body from whom a two-
thirds majority vote is required.

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By JEFFREY CHASE
Folk music should not be treat-
ed as a museum art, but rather as
a living art which must be brought
to life by the trained composer,

_ ___ _

Across Campus

a- -- . -1

.U

STUDENTS & FACULTY
Bewitce Bothered,
& B i?
Call 662-8871
(iv' Cinema d (dd

Prof. Delos Wickens of Ohio
State University will discuss "An
Evaluation of the Galvanic Skin
Response as a Measure of Associa-
tive Strength" at a psychology col-
loquium at 4:15 today in Aud. B.
Interstellar Dust ...
Prof: John Malville .of the as-
tronomy department will discuss
"Dust Between the Planets" at 8
p.m. today in Rm. 2003 Angell
Hall. A double star, Jupiter and
Saturn will be observed by tele-
scope at the program.
MUFUN..
The Michigan Union opens its
billiards room to women for the
first time in history tonight.
The occasion is MUFUN-Mich-
igan Union Fun Night. Running
from 8 p.m.-midnight, couples will
be able to bowl, play billiards or
ping pong for half price. Women
will be allowed in the second floor,
library-another first.

There will also be a Little Club
dance in the MUG.
Financial Report..*
Robert E. Pfenning, vice-presi-
dent and comptroller of General
Electric, will discuss "The Gen-
eral Electric Financial Report for
1962" at 11 a.m. today in Rm. 131
Bus. Admin. Bldg.
He will also describe "The Fi-
nance Function at General Elec-
tric" at 2:15 p.m. in Rm. 146.
Law School Panel....
DearsRoy E. Proffitt of the Law
School will moderate a panel on
"Law School Admission Practices
and Problems" at 10 a.m. today in
Rm. 100 Hutchins Hall. Members
of the, panel will include Dean
Lindsey Cowen .of the University
of Virginia law school, Dean A.
Kenneth Pye of Georgetown Uni-
versity law center and Dean Wil-
liam R. Shane of the University of
Pennsylvania law school.

Bulgarian composer and musicolo-
gist Philip Koutev said yesterday.
Koutev, creator and director of
the Bulgarian National Ensem-
ble, believes that it is necessary
to have a creative approach to-,
ward folk music and to make it
more contemporary.
The Koutev Bulgarian National
Ensemble will appear at 8:30 p.m.
today in Hill Aud. as part of the
Choral Union Series. The company
of 75 singers, dancers and instru-
mentalists is on its first tour of
the United States.
Basic Dances
Among the dances that the com-
pany will perform are the "horo,"
and the "rutchenitsa." The "horos"
are the basic folk dances of the
Bulgarian people, according to Co-
lumbia Artist Management, Inc.
of New York, the ensemble's agent.
"Horos" can be both tranquil
and wild when performed by
groups of dancers. The "rutchen-
itsa" is done in a very lively tem-
po with an endless variety of steps
as one of Bulgaria's most popular
dances for couples or solo.perform-
ers, the troupe's agent noted.
Bulgarian folk music is known
for its syncopated rhythms where
the music is sung as well as played
while the dancers perform. The
women do most of the singing,
with two or three women chant-
ing the melody while the chorus
repeats the same tune in echo
fashion.

S & FACULTY
More
YI OCT. 28-NOV. 21
)ct. 28&30
yes., Oct. 29 & 31
., Oct. 30
$5.50; Bale. $4.40, $3.30, $2.20
5; Balc. $4.40, $3.30 $2.20
40; Bale. $3.95, $3.30, $2.20

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'Much Ado' Succeeds at U-M

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SHOWS START AT
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"BIZARRE AND BARBARIC.. MACABRE AND GRUESOME...
IRONIC, BLOOD-STAINED AND SADISTIC...UNCONVENTION-
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10100 CR1E
Produced by GUALTIERO JACOPETTI
TECHNICOLOR . A Times Fim Relese

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18
Day Calendar
School of Public Health Conference-
The First Training Conference on Or-
ganized Home Care: School of Public
Health Room 3042.
U-M Medical Center Alumni Confer-'
ence-Med. Science Bldg.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar No. 99 -
Dr. Dean Berry, Assistant Prof. of In-
dustry, Wharton School of Finance,
Univ. of Pennsylvania, "Planning and
Conducting Useful Personnel Research":
Third Floor Conference Room, Mich.
Union, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Conference for Pre-Law Advisors -
Hutchins Hall, 9 a.m.
Thirty-Seventh Annual Accountants'
Conference--Rackham Lecture Hall, 10
a.m.-4:15 p.m.
Cinema Guild - James Stewart and
Kim Novak in "Bell, Book and Candle":
Architecture Aud., 7:00 and 9:00 p.m.
Dept. of Speech Univ. Players Produc-
tion-"The Miser" by Moliere: Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.
Univ. Musical Society Choral Union
Concert-Bulgarian National Ensemble,
Philip Koutev, director: Hill Aud., 8:30
p.m
U-4W Professional Theatre Program-
APA Broadway Theatre Company in
Fry's "A Phoenix Too Frequent" and
Moliere's "Scapin": Trueblood Theatre,
8:30 p.m.
School 'of Music Recital: By piano ma-
jors. Today, at 4:15 p.m. in Lane Hall.
Students include Nancy Bradley, Evan
Ferber, Jerry Davidson, and Barbara
Nissman.
Dept. of Biological Chem. and Insti.
of Science & Tech.: Prof. Feodor'Lynen,
director, Max Planck Institut fur Zell-
chemie, will speak on "Mechanism of
Fatty Acid Synthesis and its Biological
Regulation." At 4 p.m., today, 4th floor
Amphitheatre, Rackhan. Coffee will be
served in M5410 Biological Chem. Lab.
at 3:15 p.m. in Med. Science Bldg.
Astronomical Colloquium: Today, 4
p.m., Room 807, Physics-Astronomy Bldg.
Dr. Donat G. Wentzel; Dept. of Astron-
omy, will speak on "A Model of a
Solar Flare."

Doctoral Examination for Grover John
Farnsworth, Speech: thesis: "An Ap-
proach to the Study of Behavioral Inte-
gration . in Aphasic Adults," today,
Speech .Clinic,. at 2 p.m. Chairman, R. S.
Tikofsky, Rm. B27.
General Notices
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
Voice, Film Festival, Oct 24, 31; Nov.
7, 14, 21, 28; Dec. 5, 12, 7 p.m., Multi-
Purpose Room, UGLI.
Women's League, Study Abroad Panel,
Nov. 5, 7:30 p.m., League-Kalamazoo
Room.
Voice, Speakers on Civil Rights -
Malcolm X, Oct. 22, 8 p.m., Union Ball-,
room.
Voice, Table to distribute literature,
Oct. 23 & 24, 8 aam.-5 p.m., Fishbowl.
International Students Association,
Pizza Party, Oct. 18, 8:30-12:00 p.m.,
South Quad.
Michigan Union, Tri-semester Discus-
sion, Nov. 5, 8-10 p.m., Rooms R & S
in Union Bldg.
Final Payment of Falil Semester Fees
is due and payable on or before Oct.
31, 1963.
If fees are not paid by this date:
1) A $10.00 delinquent penalty will be
charged.
2) A "Hold Credit" will be placed
against you. This means that until pay-
ment is received and "Hold Credit" is
cancelled :
(1) Grades will not be mailed.
(2) Transcripts will not be furnished.
(3) You may not register for future
semesters.
(4) A Senior may not graduate with
his class at the close of the current
semester.
3) The Dean of your school or college
will be given a list of delinquent ac-
counts.
Payments may be made in person, or
mailed to the Cashier's Office, 1015 Ad-
min. Bldg.,. before 4:30 p.m., Oct. 31,
1963.
Mail Payments postmarked after due
date, Oct. 31, 1963, are late and subject

to penalty. Identify mail payment as
tuition and show student number and
name.
The Mary Louisa Hinsdale Scholarship
amounting to $214.40 (interest on the
endowment fund) is available to un-
dergrad single women who are wholly
or partially self-supporti ngand who do
not live in Univ. resid ence halls or
sorority houses. Girls with better than
average scholarship and need will be
considered.
School of Music Honors Program: Ap-
plications are now being received for the
second semester, 1963-63. Forms are
available in the School of Music Office,
Lane Hall. Deadline for receipt of appli-
cations and supporting statements by
the Honors. Council: Friday, Nov. 8.
'vents
The following sponsored student events
are approved for the coming weekend.
Social chairmen are reminded that re-
quests for approval for social events
are due in the Office of Student Affairs
not later than 12 o'clock noon on the
Tues. prior to the event.
OCT. 18-
Alpha Omicron Pi, Fall Party, 800
Oxford; Crop & Saddle Coed Riding
Club, Hayride, Susterka Lake; Greene
House, Open Open, East Quad; Hins-
dale, Mystery Party, Susterka Lake;
Jordan and Hinsdale House Mystery
Party at Susterka Lake; Markley Hall,
Party; Scott-Kleinstueck, Mixer. Mark-
ley Hall; Strauss, Hayride, Susterka
Lake; Theta Chi, Informal Party, 1351
Washtenaw; Tyler-Prescott, Open Open,
East Quad; Trigon, Study Party, 1617.
Washtenaw; Chi Psi( TGIF, 620 S. State;
Delta Gamma, Pinafore Party, 1800
Washtenaw.
OCT. 19-
Alpha Delta Phi, Band Party, 556 S.
State; Alpha Epsilon Pi, Party, 2101
Hill; Alpha Omicron Pi. Open House,
800 Oxford; Alpha Xi Delta, Fathers'
Weekend (19-20), 914 Hill; Beta Theta
Pi, Baid Party, 604 S. State; Chi Ome-
ga, Fathers' Weekend (19-20), 1525
Washtenaw; Chi Phi, Topa Party, 1530
Washtenaw; Collegiate - Sorosis, Open
House, 1501 Washtenaw; Cooley House,
Open Open, East Quad; Delta Delta
(Continued on Page 8)

TRU EBLOOD
THEATRE

SEATS AVAILABLE'at Box Office

SAT., 8:30
SUN., 3:00'

By KEN BARNARD
Free Press Staff Writer
A fetching and accomplished
production of Shakespeare's
"Much Ado About Nothing"
opened the Fall Festival of the
University of Michigan's Asso-
ciation of Producing Artists
Thursday in Trueblood Auditor-
ium, Ann Arbor.
A striking Spanish courtyard
set with clean lines provided a
flexible area for working out
the twin romances of Beatrice
with Benedick and Hero with
Claudio.
Richard Baldridge's direction
provided a deliberate pace that
resulted in extreme clarity of
expression and action.
It also decked out the play
with a generous amount of

__ f

stage business to point up the
character relationships and ex-
tract something close to the ut-
most of comic possibilities.
IN THE leading role of
Beatrice the beautiful man-
hater was Nancy Marchand,
well remembered for her crea-
tion of top feminine role in the
original television presentation
of "Marty."
She made of Beatrice a'
woman of crisp wit and arch'
manner, avoiding the coy over-
playing which has frequently
marred the rendition of this
role in less capable hands.
Opposite her as Benedick was
Ellis Raab, the APA's artistic
director.
He carefully built his por-
trayal and captivated the aud-
ience with his working out of

the scene ih which the sworn
bachelor decides that he will,
after all, become a suitor.
Clayton Corzatte, as Claudio,
submits a precise performance
that is born of rich experience
in classical assignments.
Jan Farrarand r a d i a t e s
charm and sweetness as his be-
loved Hero.
AS DON JOHN, who schemes
to poison their romance, Paul
Sparer is an excellent heavy,
exuding malevolence with little
more explanation than "I can-
not hide what I am."
Joseph Bird engenders high
spirits with his low-comedy por-
trayal of the officious and ver-
bose constable Dogberry. He has
a fine few minutes at stage
center reciting confusing and
useless orders.
-Detroit Free Press, Oct. 11, 1963

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