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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 27, 1963 - Image 37

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-08-27

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THE MICHIGAN D IAILY ;

.......rug

R MEMORIAL FOR PEACE:
'hoenix Project Probes Effect of Atom

i the world's most signifi-
rograms .to develop the
1 use of the atom stands
th Campus as a living
al to University students
i World War II.
activities of the Michigan.
al-Phoenix Project range
Udying the physical inter-
of atoms to medical radia-
the national and iterna-
legal problems of atomic
project comprises seven
s, one of which is the $1
Ford nuclear reactor, the
at any educational institu-
400 Papers
eal booksand' about 400
in technical j ournals have
L, as has the University's
te program in nuclear en-
ag, the largest in the
project has attained ,'a
interdisciplinary influence,
as its international effects
search it has done in such
as anatomy, archeaology,
logy, botony, chemistry,

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engineering, geology, law, not to
mention physics.
Perhaps the greatest strides
have been made in medicine. The
availability of tracers, such as
radioactive iodine, make possible
the investigation of numerous
biological, chemical and physical
phenomena associated with the
human ,body.
Control Parasites
Other work has been done on
controllirig p a r a s i t i c diseases
t h ro u g h irridation, diagnosing
tumors of the abdomen, thyroid,
eye and brain by means of radio-
isotopic studies, maintaining.an
.bone- bank,' in which bone and
soft tissues are stored :d be used
for surgical transplatation, and
perfecting a method of sterilizing
living bone tissue.
High level gamma radiation has
been used experimentally to dis-
infect river water. and ,sewage.
T';he project also ;serves ┬░public
and scientific interests with' its
radiocarbon dating techniques.
This laboratory work fixes through
Carbon 14 disintegration dates of
various prehistoric materials and
objects. Skulls from the Himalyas,
tusk fragments from New Mexico
and agricultural tools from Mex-
ico have all been dated from the
'University facilities.
Legal Scope
Legal problems involved. in the
use of the. atom have their place
in the project's scope. The Atomic
Unergy Research Program of the
University's Legal Research In-
stitute serves as a clearing house
for national and-'international'
complications in law.
At present the project is con-
sidering new methods of financing
itself when the $2 million raised
by the last fund drive in 1959 runs
out.
While the project has a budget
of approximately $400,000 a year,
the University \contributes slightly
less than $100,00. Among the al-
ternatives now being considered,,
the project could ask the Univer-
sity to raise its share of the costs,
seek federal support as well as
having the government -support
specific grants or ask industry, to
contribute more to its upkeep.
Additional money is desired :t'
modernize the 10 year old reactor
in order to. expand and conduct
more elaborate experiments.

Art Museum
Shows Vary
(Continued from Page 1)

BOTTOM-UP-A reactor floor view of the Phoenix Project's Ford
Nuclear Reactor shows the long tubes used to insert into the
reactor material to be irradiated. The project runs an irradiating
service for University and private researchers.
DIVERSIFY STUDIES:
Distributin Requiements
Broaden Student Outlook

ahns
Presented by
The University Musical Society
,f .'
CHORAL UNION SE RIES
Hill Auditorium
NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC--LEONA.RD BERNSTEIN, ConduCtor . ... W ednesday, Sept.
GYQRGY SANDOR, Pianist .,. . .. . .. .. .. . ... .. . . . . .. .. .. . .. ... Tuesday, Sept.
JEROME HINES, Bass. ................... -- .. .-...--------------. ---...Monday, Oct.
BULGARIAN NATIONAL ENSEMBLE-PHILIP KOUTEY, Director . . . ... .. .. Friday, Oct.
THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA-GEORGE SZELL, Conductor .. .. . ... .Thursday, Nov.
Don Giovanni (Mozart)-NEW YORK CITY OPERA COMPANY. .. . .. ...Sunday, Nov.
PHILHARMONIA HUNGARICA-TOSSY SPIVAKOYSKY, Violin Soloist .. .. . .Monday, Jan.
MAZOWSZE DANCE COMPANY (from Poland) .. ... . .. .. . ... .. . .. .Thursday, Jan.
TERESA BERGANZA, C0oratura ~mezzo-soprauo .. .. . .. ... .. . ... .. Wednesday, Feb.
CHICAGO OPERA BALLET.. . .. .. .. ..................- -- . -----.---. . ..Friday, March
Season Tickets: $24.00-$20.00-$ 17.00-$ 14.00-$ 12.00. Now on Sale.
Single Concerts: $4.50-4.00-3.50-3.00-2.25-1.50. On Sole Sept. 5.
.... ..
Hi AuditoriumN
Tosca (Puccini)-GoLDovSKY OPERA THEATER.. . .. ... .. .. .. .. ..Thursday, Oct.
BALLET FOLKLORICO OF MEXICO..... .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. .... . .. . . ....Fiay, Nov.
Madama Butterfly (Puccini) .. . ... .. .. . ... ... . ... . .. . . ..(2:30) Sunday, Nov.
NEW YORK CITY OPERA COMPANY
VIENNA SYMPHONY ORCHSE TRA . ..,.,........----- Thursday, Feb.
WOLFGANG SAWALLISCH, Conductor
ANNA MOFFO, SoraMN..................- odut....... .... Friday, April

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began with former acting-Presi-
dent Harry S. Frieze, w ho served
? as curator of the. collections until .
his death in 1889. On a European
trip he purchased a collection of
engravings and photographs and
copies of classical sculpture to illu-
strate his lectures on the Arts of
Classical Antiquity.
First Donation
The first important original
work was donated to the Univer-
sity by alumni in- 1862. It was a
sculpture entitled "Nydia," by the'
American sculptor Randolph Rog-
ers, who had spent his youth in
American and who later became
one of the leading figures in the
Classical Revival.
-The University collections moved
from one building- on campus to
another, until they. were finally
established. in Alumni Memorial
Hall on its completion in 1910.
Lewis Bequest
In the meantime, almost 500
paintings by European artists of
the 19th century had, been be-
quested , to the University by
Henry C. Lewis of Coldwater.
Collections of Egyptian anti-
qutiels of the first to third cen-
turies after Christ were expanded
'by archaeological┬░ .expeditions of
Prof. Francis W. Kelsey. They.
were the beginnings of the Kelsey
Museum of Archaeology.
In 1946, the Museum of .Art
became an administrative unit,
and the University embarked on
an incidenral program. The' Mar-;
garet Watson Parker bequest pro-
vided for "over 600 items to 'be
iven to the. University. This is
"the most important single col-'
lection of works of art acquired
by the University to date," Prof.
Charles H. Sawyer, director of the
art museum, said.
Recently, the museum's acquisi-
tion program was extended to in-
clude early Western art since the
Sixth Century A.D., Near and Far
Eastern art including India, but
with emphasis on Japan and
China.

The University requires that
certain courses be taken "to pro-
vide all students with a broad in-
tellectual experience in the major
fields of knowledge."
The first required courses that
a student meets are in English
composition: English 123 and 124.
The emphasis in these classes is
the writing of effective prose. The
students who receive an A grade
in the first course are exempted
from the second, but are expected
to take some other English
course.
Dur in g orientation freshmen
take a foreign language placement
test. This test m i enable him to
the four semester profiency re-
quirement. However, the Univer-
sity provides 13 languages to meet

the foreign language distribution
requirement.
The most hours are required in
the social sciences. Fourteen se--
mester hours of work are needed
in at least two departments.
Twelve hours of work are re-
quired in the ,natural sciences.
This includes a two semester lab-
oratory sequence.
To meet the humanities require-
mint a student must complete a
two semester sequence in one sub-
ject.
Most of these requirements must
be met in the first 60 hours of
study. The distribution courses
. may not be used for concentration
in a major.

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Special Textbook Service
for PRE-REGISTERED STUDENTS
(No Cash Required)
Reserve Books This EASY Way-
AVOID the usual RUSH, crowds and waiting
lines. Fill in this schedule card, drop in mail,
then forget about next semester's books until
you pick them up during the orientation.
period.
WE GUARANTEE - We will select GOOD
USED or NEW required books, as you specify,
sack 'em, and have ready for you to pick up
at your convenience. We'll protect you on any
course you change.

Season Tickets:
Single Concerts:

$12.00-$10.00-$8.50-$7.00-$6.00. Now on Sale.
$4.50-4.00-3.50-300--2.25-1.50. On Sale Sept. 5.

CHAMBER ARTS SERIES
Rackhacm Auditorium
KIMIO ETO, Kotoist, with SUZUSHI HANAYAGI and assisting musicians .... Sunday, Oct.
MoSCoW CHAMBER ORCHESTRA-RUDOLF BARSHAI, Conductor . ... Wednesday, Nov.
JULIANT BREAM CONSORT..... ................. .. . .............Tuesday, Nov.
Treble lute, pandora, cittern, viol, flute, and violin

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SESTETTO ITALIANO LUCA MARENZIO ...................'....uesday, Dec.,10

Madrigals and Christmas music from taly
ZURICH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA-EDMOND DESTOUTZ, Cnd0uct0...... . Saturday, Jan.
KOREAN COMPANY OF DANCERS AND MUSICIANS .. .... . . .. .. . .. . . . .....Sunday, Feb.
ORCHESTRA SAN PIETRO OF NAPLES . .. .... . . ..:... ......... Thursday; March

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RENATO RUOTOLO, Director
Season Tickets: $1'4.00-$12.00-$10.00 Now on Sale
Single Concerts: $3.50-$2.50-$2.00 On Sale Sept.'5
ANNUAL CHRIST MAS CONCERTS

PUBLISHED
FOUR TIMES A YEAR
.9'

--GUARANTEED
THE RIGHT BOOK
FOR tH E RIGHT COURSE!

Messiah (Handel) (Two Performances)
Soloists:
LOIS MARSHALL, Sopra no
BEVERLY WOLFF, COntralto
'JOHN CRAIG, Tenor
RICHARD CROSS, Bass

. ." . . . .. s.. .. . ;. .. ..+ Saturday, D ee.
(2:30) Sunday, Dec.
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION

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THE UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
MARY MCCALL STUBBINS, Organist
LESTER MCCOY, Conductor

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r------------.......-------..------ ------ -------- -- - 1
l I
B K R E SE RVAT I t) CA RD
FALL 1963 SEMESTERI
FILL IN THIS CARD and reserve your books
Dept. Course for 1st semester. WE GUARANTEE to have I
Dp'No. the right books ready for you, as you indicate. I
I ______ SAME SERVICE to Cash or Charge Customers I
I I
I Home I
_ _ _ _ Address City __
I prefer D GOOD USED Eli NEW BOOKS
_______ Iwill be a El cash, or L charge customer I
I ____Your order will be ready by Aug. 20, 1963.
I _ __ __ _ __ __ __ _ SignedI
I I
Local Address CityI
I {(f available) I
------------------------------
Mail YOUR Reservation Card
AT ONCE !

a

Chamber Dance Festival
MARINA SvETLOVA DANCE ENSEMBLE .................
SHANTA RAo, and Company of Dancers
and Musicians from South India.. ..
HUNGARIAN BALLETS BIHARI--KOVACH and
RABOVSKY, with Gypsy Musicians...... ......
Season Tickets: $6.00-$5.00-$4.00
Single Performances: $3.50-.-$2.50-$2.00
On Sale Sept. 5
Chamber Music Festival (three concerts).................
NEW YORK PRO MUSICA, NOAH GREENBERG, DireCtor
Season Tickets: $6.00-$5.00-.$4:00
Single Performances: $3.50-$2.50-$2.00
On Sale Nov. 5
Ann Arbor May Festival (Six Concerts)........:.........

Tickets: X2.00-X1.50-$1.O.Q-75c
On sale beginning Oct. 10
FESTIVAL

..Friday, Oct. 25
.Saturday, Oct. 26
(2 30) Sunday, Oct. 27

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... 3Feb. 14,215,16
April 30, May 1, 2, 3

to

THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA, EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor;
rrr.A ...' ini 4r l4PYC 141 Cft~ lVCIC_

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