100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 12, 1963 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

I

MSU Favored To Extend Streak over 'M' JI! m 72'

'1n~.
< " t

EA

By JIM BERGER
Associate Sports Editor

I

9

Michigan State is aiming fori
an unprecedented five straight
wins over Michigan this after-
noon before an expected 101,001
sell-out crowd at Michigan Stad-
ium starting at 1:30 p.m.
The Spartans favored by seven
points have defeated the Wolver-
ines four straight years since 1959
when the two teams tied, 12-12.
In the past 13 years State has
won 10 times; Michigan has won
twice.
Although the game has not been
officially declared a sell-out,
Michigan ticket manager Don
Weir expects the game will be
sold out at the gate. The remain-
ing tickets will be on sale prior
to the game.
Jinx
Twice before Michigan State has
set the Wolverines down four
straight times only to be thwarted
in their fifth attempt. Between
1934-37, between 1950-54, and
now, the Spartans have made it
four straight.
This afternoon, both Michigan
and Michigan State sport ident-
ical 1-1 records. Michigan defeat-
ed Southern Methodist, 27-16,
two' weeks ago in the opener and
last week bowed to fourth ranked
Navy, 26-13. The Spartans blast-
ed North Carolina, 31-0, in their
opener and bowed to eighth-
ranked Southern Cal; 13-10, last
week at Los Angeles.
Today's game will be the 56th
meeting of the two teams. Mich-
igan has won 35; State ha- won
16 and there have been four ties.
Little Weight Difference
The weight up front for the
starting teams is almost identical.
The Wolverines average 213 per
man while the Spartans average
211. Michigan averages an even
200 in the backfield while State
averages a light 181.
Michigan will probably feature
an aerial show as coach Bump El-
liott will start Bob Chandler at
For Direct
from 1:00 to 3:0
HELP WANTED
WANTED--Responsible woman, age 30-
35. Knowledge of animals preferred
but not essential. Part time position
developing to full time. Call 663-7747.
H45
FULL OR PART TIME HELP-Apply
McDonald's Drive In, 2000 W. Sta-
dium. H44

quarterback. Chandler, who got
his first chance against Navy last
weekend, completed nine of 10
passes for 138 yards. His favorite
target was end John Henderson
whom Chandler hit for two touch-
downs.
Lincoln May Play
Spartan coach Duffy Daugherty
expects that injured halfback

halfback Dick Rindfuss
listed as starters today.
Newcomers

The Spartans lost their whole
line with the exception of end
Matt Snorton through gradua-
tions, and Daugherty has been
complaining all year about the
lack of weight and experience up
front. Against Southern Cal, the

are allI

However, the Spartans think of
themselves as a running team and
they have the horses.
Horses
Senior Sherman Lewis, a "scat-
back's scatback" weighing 152
pounds, is probably the fastest
football player in the Big Ten.
Lewis this season has carried 15
times for 71 yards for a neat 4.7
average.
Horse number two is Roger
Lopes, who qualifies in the work
horse category. Playing for two
years behind All-American George
Saimes, Lopes finally has gotten
his chance this season. The 210-
pound senior fullback has carried
39 times for 242 yards for a big
6.2 average.
Lincoln is the dark horse. The
senior from Hamtramck has car-
ried 11 times for 18 yards. How-
ever, the 181-pound running back
has hurt Michigan twice before
Frosh Basketball
Freshman basketball coach
Tom Jorgensen has announced
a tryout meeting for all pros-
pective freshman basketball
players at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, in
the I-M Sports Bldg.
and no Michigan fan doubts his
ability.
Adding to this list is Ron Ru-
bick, a leading Spartan last sea-
son, who hasn't played yet this
season due to a knee injury. The
word is now that Rubick is 100
per cent ready, and we'll probably
see plenty of him this afternoon.
'M' Backs
The Wolverines' leading ground-
gainer is Rindfuss. In two games
the 191-pound junior has picked
up 91 yards in 12 carries for a
7.59 average. Sophomore Jack
Clancy is the number-two ground-
gainer with 72 yards in 11 carries.
Fullback Mel Anthony has 44
yards in 19 carries.
Today's meeting will be the first
conference clash of the season for

MSU
Krzemienski
Herman
Larrimer
Ross
Karpinski
Bentley
Snorton
Juday
Lewis
Ammon
Lopes

Pos.
LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

Michigan
Conley
Keating
O'Donnell
Cecehini
Hahn
Year by
Laskey
Chandler
Clancy
Rindf uss
Anthony

the two teams. Both teams held
light workouts yesterday. State
worked out in the Stadium; Mich-
igan at Ferry Field. We'll just
have to wait and see if State can
make it five straight.
THE LINEUPS

-Daily--;Bruce Taylor
STEAL--Michigan pass defender sophomore Tom Cecchini (53)
picks off a Navy pass during the second half of last we k' 1

loss. Cecchini is the first team
defense.
Dewey Lincoln will see action
against the Wolverines. Lincoln
who has a hairline jaw fracture
is not listed as a starter but will
be dressed and is expected to play.
Michigan's only injury is left
halfback Dick .Wells who is still
ailing from a bruised hip, and
won't be dressed. Other Wolver-
ines injured last Saturday: start-
ing guard Joe O'Donnell, starting
tackle Bill Yearby, and starting

center on offense as well as on
Spartans used only 21 men, and
the Trojans who scored all their
points in the last periods exploited
this advantage to its fullest.
Michigan State has always gone
with a sophomore, quarterback
this season. Steve Juday seems to
follow the tradition of recent
Spartan signalcaller-s. He has
completed an unrespectable 34
per cent of his passes, but his
completions have been key ones.

Classified Ad Service, Phone NO 2-4786
'0 P.M. Monday through Friday, and Saturday 9:30 'til 11:30 A.M.

1

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS

2
3
4

70
.85
1.00

1.95
2.40
2.85

3.45
4.20
4.95

PERSONAL
"REALLY TO KNOW" Defined. See ad-
vertisement, page 3. F49
DIAMONDS-Highest quality at com-
petitive prices. Call C. K. Reaver Co.
of Ann Arbor, 300 S. Thayer, NO
2-1132. F18
THE TIME has come: It's finally HERE!
F21
IT'S HERE! IT'S HERE! IT'S HERE!
F22
SOPH SHOW IS FINALLY HERE! F23
AUSTIN DIAMOND CORPORATION -
"where marginal prices buy quality
diamonds!" 1209 S. University. 663-
7151. F73

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Woman's engagement and
wedding ring. Never have been worn.
Original price $225. Will sell for $150.
Call 662-2196 between 5:30 and 7:30
p.m. B28
PORTABLE STEREO, Motorola. Two
412" detachable speakers with 10'
cords. One 6" speaker. Excellent con-
dition. Reasonable price. Cal NO 3-
9348 between 5 and 7 P.M. Ask for
John W. B27
FOR SALE-Microscope "Zeiss' mono-
oular-binocular. excellent cond. Ph.
542-6431, Detroit. B9
RCA-VICTOR clock-radio for sale. AM,
almost new, works very well. White
with gold numerals. 5-9761, Ext. 104.
Bll
REAL ESTATE
HOUSE FOR SALE-2 Bedrm, $9500, 3
lots, Roc face cement block garage.
Whitmore Lake Sub. Call 30175. F4
HOUSE-Three bedrooms, $14,000, $1,100
down. Lakewood, 115 Highlake, city,
gas heat, full basement, fenced back-
yard, wooded lot, near elementary
school, lake, shopping center, bus
line. Almn. storm screens-screen
porch, tool shed, electric stove, dish-
washer. NO 5-5839. R3
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
GUITARS, ETC.
Make. Repiar, Buy and Sell
Private and Group Instruction
Hoots Daily
Herb David Guitar Studio
209 S. STATE
NO 5-8001
Xi
PETS AND SUPPLIES
FALL SALE
Ten gallon - complete aquarium set.
(not economy). Sale price $15.98, reg.
price $20.98. Specials and bargains
galore.
FIFTH AVE. PET SHOP
215 S. Fifth Ave.
NO 3-7747
9 a.m.-8:30 p.m.-Closed Sunday
100 Top Value Stamps free with this
ad. Conic in and browse. Ti
BUSINESS SERVICES
25c A PAGE for either theses or themes.
Free pick up and delivery. HA 6-
8374. J17
CUSTOM MAKING for ladies fine ap-
parel. Restyling on your favorite suit
or dress. Also fast alteration on any
garment. 665-6965. J16
AVON REP, now on N. Campus. Will
service dorms. Xmas gift specials.
Call 665-7490. J13
ANN ARBOR PIANO SCHOOL-Classics,
Jazz, Theory, taught by pro. pianist.
308 Catherine, Ann Arbor. 662-3735.
J15
BARGAIN CORNER

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Phone NO 2-4786

i

TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Ride to Miami of Ohio in
Oxford, Ohio, the weekend of Oct. 25.
Call Judy at 3-7541, Ext. 761. G7
WANT RIDE Tuesday and Thursday
from Ypsi to campus and arrive by 9
a.m., to leave at 6 p.m. Will share
expenses. Call 483-4452. Gi
USED CARS
'61 RAMBLER Amer., standard trans. R
and H, top. Call Gold, Univ. ext. 3048
or 663-1883. N6
1963 VW-NO 5-0405. N5
1957 FORD-Excel. mech. cond. Body
and tires very good. $450. NO 2-1291
after 5:30 p.m. N4
1955 DODGE, 4 door, R and H. Good
cond. Clean. Good rubber. Call 663-
0473. N7
1960 FIAT-In good condition, less than
10,000 miles. Phone NO 2-2625. N50
1929 HUDSON super 6, 4 door sedan.
Call 449-7051. N48
1963 BUICK LE SABLE-4-door hard-
top, power brakes and steering, many
extras. Excellent condition, low mile-
age, private owner. HU 2-0405. N37
COMPETITION PREPARED
1963 Sunbeam Alpine: Engine and
trans. just rebuilt; a very competi-
tive race car.
Call Bill Wooding - NO 3-4213. 62
ALFA-ROMEO'S
1964 models on display now. ALSO: 1960
Alfa '2000 roadster, sharp, 28,000 miles,
1959 Alfa Giulletta Spider, black,
radio, nice, $1495. 1958 Alfa Super
Spider, red, engine overhauled, nice,
$1495.
Overseas Imported Cars Inc.
331 S. 4th. 662-25411

FOR RENT

2 ROOM FURNISHED apt. Private bath.
1207 Willard St. Phone 5-3446. C18
SPACIOUS 3 RM. APT. Ideal for grad
or prof. couple. 605 Elmcrest Dr., one
block N. of Summit off Minor. Can
be seen after 1 p.m. C17
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to share
State St. luxury apt. with 3. 665-2719.
C16
3 ROOMS AND BATH near campus. Off-
street parking. NO 5-7215 or 2-2545
after 6. C12
ROOM FOR RENT-Clean, pleasant;
garage included. Male student pre-
ferred. 223 Buena Vista. NO 2-7692.
C50
GARAGE and open parking available
near intersection of Wilmont, Forest
and Geddes. Also next to Harris Hall.
Call NO 2-7787. C14
PARKING PLACE
Block from Law Quad. $4.50 per ma
NO 3-7268. C45
BEL-AIR APTS.-1 and 2 bedrooms. All
new. Danish modern furniture. Air-
conditioning, balconies, wall to wall
carpeting. Campus location. 2-5780.
Eves. 2-5140. C24
PERSONAL
GREETINGS DEARIE.
Matilda did very well selling Gar-
goyles Wednesday-but there are still
200 left. That's not bad considering
8,000 were printed.
Irma said you can still get a Gar-
goyle at the main office in the Stu-
dent Publications Building, at Slater's
Book Store and at the Michigan Phar-
macy.
Better hurry though . . . the Great
Pumpkin is coming.
Love and Kisses,
George F20

The COTTAGE INN is throwing a
PIZZA PARTY for the football play-
ers if they beat MSU. George and Pat
Paron. F18
ABOLISH STUDENT GOVERNMENT-
To sign or help circulate petitions,
call Jim or Terry at'5-3490. F17
The MET-TET is MUSIC. NO 8-6807. F26
ROMANOFF'S RESTAURANT
300 S. Thayer
Serving German Food
CHARTER FLIGHT TO NEW YORK!-
Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays.
Total package-$43. Call Mr. Gampel,
NO 8-8141, 4-8 P.M. F3
REWARD for a black boy's bike, license
201D. 928 Church, Apt. 2. 665-3481.
F16
$1.25
HAIRCUT, Mon. thru Thurs., 347 May-
nard, near Arcade. $1.50 Fri. and Sat.
LIQUOR, BEER, WINE, CHAMPAGNE
Available at: The Village Apothecary,
1112 S. University, Ann Arbor. F
SHORT STORI ES
NOW BEING considered for publi-
cation in the campus inter-arts mag-
azine, GENERATION. All material
submitted will be carefully read,
criticized, and returned if not used.
Manuscripts may be left at the main
office, Student Publications Bldg.
First issue in October.
GENERATION
FOR SALE
One roommate. Slightly used. Best of-
fer accepted. May be inspected be-
tween hours 6-8 p.m. Mon. thru Fri.
Call Tom, X 372 S. Quad. F43
I'D GIVE you my autograph but my
middle name starts with a C. F19
DEAR POOPSIE-
Please send $43 for my charter air
flight to New York over Thanksgiving.
Inexpensive, isn't it? I need it by
next Wednesday before the flight
fills up. S. F5
JOHN, will you PLEASE return Martha's
at the MSU-UM Mixer. F15
RIDE WANTED to Chicago weekend of
Oct. 25. Willing to share expenses.
Call Bonnie, 3-1561, Ext. 1275. F7
. .- . r - . P _ .

BIG TEN:
Wisconsin
Favored
By The Associated Press
MADISON- Unbeaten Wiscon-
sin launches defense of its Big
Ten football championship today
when it meets sopomore-studded
Purdue before a near capacity
crowd of 60,000.
The Badgers, owner of two
straight non-conference victories
and two weeks rest, are ranked
fifth in the nation after defeating
Western Michigan 41-0 and Notre
Dame 14-9.
Purdue has demonstrated a
stout defense in losing 3-0 to
Miami of Florida and defeating
Notre Dame 7-6. The Boilermak-
ers attack has had trouble scor-
ing despite the passing of Ron
DiGravio, a senior with a mighty
arm.
Wisconsin appears to h a v e
found capable replacements for
the 1962 passing tandem of Ron
VanderKelen and Pat Richter in
Junior quarterback Hal Brandt
and end Jimmy Jones.
Surprise May Prevail
COLUMBUS - Woody Hayes'
Ohio State Buckeyes, who some-
times throw a forward pass once
in every half, are favored by a
touchdown to grind down Big Ten
co-leader Illinois today. But look
out-this year ends in three.
The two teams have met for 50
straight years, and every 10 years
-those ending in three - some-
thing big has occurred in the
game.
Red Grange, then a sophomore,
scored a touchdown in a 9-0 Illi-
nois victory in 1923 that gave his
team a tie for the Big Ten title.
In 1933, the Bucks won 7-6 as
they blocked an Illinois conver-
sion try and a field goal attempt.
In 1943, Paul Brown won with
his Baby Bucks, on a field goal
kicked by a freshman saxophone
player 12 minutes after the "final"
whistle.
The game apparently had ended
26-26 after an incomplete Ohio
State pass, and both teams were
in the dressing rooms when the
officials ruled Illinois offside on
the last play and gave the Bucks
one more chance. Brown selected
18-year-old John Stungis who had
played the saxophone in his high
school band the year before, to
kick the field goal, although Stun-
gis had never tried one in a game.
"Nothing to it," Brown assured
the boy. "All through high school
and college I never missed one."
Stungis kicked it from 25 yards
out for a 29-26 Ohio State victory,
and said: "I'm like you coach,
100 per cent on field goals."
Brown said: "You're way ahead
of me. I never even tried one."
In 1953, Illinois upset highly
favored .Ohio State with J. C.
Caroline running for 192 yards
and two touchdowns and Mickey
Bates for 147 yards and four
scores. The final was 41-20.
NU Seeks Revenge
EVANSTON - Northwestern's
Wildcats, once-beaten Big Ten
football favorite, tangles with
enigmatic Minnesota at Dyche
Stadium today.
The Gophers, virtually stripped
of personnel which nearly swept
them to the conference title last
year, displayed considerable im-
provement between an opening
14-7 loss to Nebraska and a 24-8
triumph over Army.
However, this is Minnesota's
first road game- and Northwest-
ern's Wildcats are twitching to
atone for last Saturday's 10-9 up-
set at Illinois. Earlier, they trim-
med Missouri and Indiana.

A crowd of 45,000 is expected
for the renewal of an old and
spirited rivalry, to be televised
nationally at 1:30 p.m. by CBS.
It was last season's free-wheel-
ing 34-22 triumph by Northwest-
ern at Minneapolis, along with a
closing 14-9 setback at Wisconsin,
which cost the Gophers the Big
Ten crown.
In that 1962 battle, Tom Myers
flipped four touchdown passes

KNOXVILLE - Upset-minded
Tennessee tackles Georgia Tech in
a homecoming football game be-
fore what promises to be a sell-
out crowd of 51,527.
Georgia Tech, which has yielded
only one touchdown in three
SMU Trips
Navy in .Fin,
DALLAS P)-Trackman John
Roderick ran Navy into the ground
in the fading minutes last night
and Southern Methodist knocked
over the nation's No. 4 football
team 32-28 in the second smash-
ing upset in a row for the Metho-
dists.
Roger Staubach, magnificent in
defeat, led Navy on a wild drive
that reached the SMU seven with
one second left. Staubach's pass
into the end zone was batted down
by Tommy Caughran as the last
gun fired.
Roderick's 14-yard run on third
down got SMU moving on a last
quarter desperation drive and his
six-yard run on another third
down situation got SMU within 21/2
yards of the goal line. Then Rod-
erick cracked over for the touch-
down.
Navy regained the lead on a
field goal by Fred Marlin with
2:52 left. But Roderick raced 23
yards to get SMU going on an-
other drive. Finally, pass inter-
ference was called on Navy at its
one-yard line and Billy Gannon
smashed across for the touchdown
that, knocked Navy from the un-
beaten ranks.
Roderick's great running capped
an SMU rally that began when
Danny Thomas raced 45 yards for
a touchdown with the Mustangs
trailing 25-13 in the third quarter.
A crowd of 37,000 roared its ap-
proval of an SMU team that never
quit and fought back against some
of the toughest breaks it ever got
Roderick, the 9.4 trackman who
came out for football only this
season, was the hero.
This was the Southern Metho-
dist team that had won only five
games in the last three years and
started this season with a 27-16
Amfa+ a h anrle fMiruiinn a

By The Associated Press
DALLAS-A head-on clash be-
tween the two top-rated college
football teams in the nation; a
teacher-pupil duel between two
coaches who like the sweet taste
of success; and the 58th game of
a rivalry traditionally so intense
that it fills Dallas' huge Cotton
Bowl even when the teams aren't
so highly rated.
All that makes the Texas-Okla-
homa game the top event on to-
day's football program.
The Oklahoma Sooners took
over the No. 1 spot in the national
football rankings after they beat
Southern California two weeks
ago. Texas is No. 2 in the Asso-
ciated Press poll.

games, is rated a solid favorite to
pin the third Southeastern Con-
ference setback in a row on Ten-
nessee.
Tennessee's problem would seem
to be fairly simple-stop quarter-
back Billy Lothridge. But putting
a halter on Lothridge is no sim-
ple matter.
Lothridge, Tech's "Mr. Do-It-
All," has figured in all except one
of the Yellowjackets' scoring plays
this season.
It was the same old story last
year when Tech whipped the Vols,
17-0. Lothridge scored one touch-
down, passed for another, kicked
both extra points and a field' goal,
thus figuring in all 17 points.
* * *

-Daily-James Keson
LOOKOUT BELOW-Michigan halfback Dick Rindfuss high steps by Navy defender Pat Philbin (75)
in last week's encounter. Rindfuss carried eight times for 33 yards before leaving the game with a leg
injury. Coming up to cover on the play are Middies Ed Merino 4(87) and Bob Sutton (16). Left
sprawled on the ground after missing Rindfuss is Larry Kocisko (66).
NATIONAL ROUNDUP:
Oklaho-ma, Texas Clash

Bud Wilkinso
one of the most
of all time with
record, includi:
this seaon. Roya
pupils as an 0
68-27-3 for n
three victories1
Texas leads i
with two ties,;
year, when both
win conferenc
and lose bowl g
*
Tennessee

n of Oklahoma is
successful coaches
a 139-27-4 career
ng two victories
al, one of his prize
klahoma player, is
ine seasons, plus
this year.
n the series, 35-20
and won 9-6 last
teams went on to
e championships
ames.
*U *n
Upset-Minded

Trojans Favored
SOUTH BEND-Southern Cali-
fornia and Notre Dame meet to-
day in the 1963 renewal of their
famed football rivalry - and
Southern Cal is favored to score
its first victory in 24 years on
the home field of the Fighting
Irish.
The Trojans, winless here in
eight games since 1939, currently
rank seventh nationally and have
back virtually the same team that
romped over the Irish 25-0 last
year.
i In addition they have newcomer
* Mike Garrett, sophomore left'
halfback, who is heralded the
best runner since the Trojans'
celebrated Jon Arnett. Last week
I Garrett scooted 118 yards in 10
carries, including a 52-yard touch-
Top-Rnked
a Comeback
iod to escape with a 3-0 decision
over the Hurricanes.
In the closing minutes an 80-
yard run to the Miami goal by
Don Schwab was recalled because
of a holding penalty. On the final
play Miami's Hoyt Sparks dropped
a sure touchdown pass from
George Mira in the LSU end zone.
Mira, returning to the form that
made him an'All-America last
Z season, twice directed the Hurri-
canes deep into LSU territory.
Each time, when a fourth down
situation came up, Coach Andy
Gustafson ordered a field goal try
and 45,986 fans rocked the Orange
Bowl with boos.
With Mira hitting his receivers
beautifully, they wanted the Hur-
ricanes to go for it all, not a tie.
Both field goal tries by Don Cifra
were from difficult positions.
A scoreless deadlock was brok-
en in the third period when Danny
- Leblanc and Joe Labruzzo led the
Tigers with smashing runs to the
Miami 10. On fourth down, with
three to go, Doug Moreau kicked
the winning field goal.
Immediately afterward, and al-
though his protection crumbled
under the hard rushes of the Ti-
gers, Mira got the Hurricanes in
high gear. He hit Bob Barth with.
s a 22-yard pass, then broke loose
on a 37-yard run to the LSU 15.
After a clipping penalty set
Miami back to the 27, Cifra tried
a field goal from 44 yards out and
it was wide and short.
Another Miami attack, during
which Mira hit five passes, surged
to the LSU 22 and Cifra missed a
e field goal from 39 yards away.
All season Mira has been
plagued by butter-fingered receiv-
ers and last night was no excep-

down sprint, as USC rallied for
a 13-10 victory over Michigan
State.
Garrett's breakaway s p e e d,
which has produced an 8.5-yard
average in three games, enhances
a versatile Trojan offense that
also has the running of fleet Wil-
lie Brown at left half and the
passing of Pete Beathard to end
Hal Bedsole.
USC, the 1962 national cham-
pion, opened the 1963 season with
a 14-0 triumph over Colorado and
then lost 17-12 to Oklahoma, be-
fore beating Michigan State.
Notre Dame so far has found it
difficult to crank up an offense
to go with its rugged defense. The
Irish were edged in their first two
starts 14-9 by Wisconsin and 7-6
by Purdue. In each game, the
winners had to come from behind
in the final quarter.
* *
Duke Seeks Fourth
BPRKELEY-Duke's Blue Devils
rate as favorites to beat California
today in an intersectional foot-
ball game between two teams with
vastly different records.
The southerners have won three
straight this season and are out
to repeat as Atlantic Coast Con-
ference champions. California has
lost two after beating Iowa State
in its opener and faces a tough
job to avoid repeating as cellar
dwellers in the Big Six.
Coach Mary Levy of the Bears
indicated his club will emphasize
the ground attack for the first
time this season when he said,
"We threw too much against
Pittsburgh and I don't want the
Cal attack to be known as an
aerial circus."
California's quarterback Craig
Morton completed 19 of 38 passes
as the Bears lost to Pitt 35-15.
The throws gained 206 yards but
the Bears gained only 51 on the
ground. For three games they're
averaging less than 100 yards
rushing.
Duke rallied to whip Maryland
30-12 last week behind sophomore
quarterback Scotty Glacken. Half-
backs Jay Wilkinson and Billy
Futrell, plus fullback Mike Curtis
provide the visitors with a potent
running attack.
Rice. Eratic
HOUSTON-Stanford and Rice,
a pair of teams that have had
trouble with fumbles and pass in-
terceptions, meet tonight with the
Californians seeking their first
victory in three starts against the
Southwest Conference school.
Rice, with a 1-1 record, is a
two-touchdown favorite over the
Indians, 1-2.
Rice'was impressive while up-
setting Louisiana State two weeks
ago, but two fumbles and three
intercepted passes contributed to
last week's 28-7 downfall against
Penn State.
Ruggers Anyone?
The Michigan Rugby Club
plays the Oshawa Vikings to-
day, at Wine's Field, 3:30 p.m.
Stanford, after splitting even
in games with San Jose State and
Oregon, had a 9-3 lead over UCLA
last Saturday until a 47-yard
fourth period pass interception
return led to a 10-9 defeat.
Both coaches may alternate
with two or more quarterbacks.
Walter McReynolds apparently
had the Rice position nailed down
after the LSU game but his un-
derstudy, Benny Hollingsworth,

N 2

APA TICKETS for sale for Sat., Oct.
12. Call Sue, NO 5-0467. F10

BIKES AND SCOOTERS

1963 SILVER EAGLE Motor Scooter -
Fully equipped, 4 months old. Cost
$616. Will take $400. 2740 Tim, Wooa-
ldnd Lake, Brighton, anytime after
5 p.m. Z29
HONDA of Ann Arbor
1906 Packard Road
665-9281 I
Z3
1960 CUSHMAN SCOOTER-New paint
job. Call 662-7880. Z22
1961 LAMBRETTA - All extras. 2900

WANTED-Data acquisition experts to
work in the quads. Apply at once.
F11
FURNITURE for Sale. Call 30175. F5

RONI, HOW 've ya' BEEN? F45
The MET-TET for the JET-SET. NO
8-6807. F30

E5
i0

AT DARWI1 N'S

HOUSEHOLD Furnishings, appliances,
tables, glassware, books, antiques.

miles, exc. running cond. $270.
4111, Ext. 257 after 7:30 p.m.

665-
Z28

2930 5. State

NO 8-7744

FOR SALE-Bella Motor Scooter, like
new. One of the finest made. Must
see to appreciate. 665-3291. Z12
AICrCII AbCAIIC

F
SCRIPTS AVAILABLE for filming. Mail
to 543 Church. Will return to writer.
F36

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan