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October 12, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-12

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ti.

PAGE TWO

TEUfU UB IIV Ili Ca r w A Yo 1

,..-. -I A N 'WI N A'P'3l U lw 'W'f'W' " A' Y .-.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1963

I

ACE Kl ListDid utCANTS:s
Kelly4Lists Desired Qualities

By JOHN WELER
"The stress is on quality and
not quantity in choosing appli-
cants for the Peace Corps," Prof
E. Lowell Kelly of the psychology
department said yesterday.
rCollege
Roundup
By Intercollegiate Press
ROCKFORD-Rockford College
has announced a new student con-
tract system which guarantees the
signer that his tuition will not be
increased during his four years in
college.
This "degree plan" was an-
nounced by Rockford President
sjohn A. Howard.
Under the new optional plan
beginning this year, a student or
his parent contracts for the re-
maining years of tuition at the
current rate. A slightly higher
amount is paid the first year and
'lesser amounts each succeeding
year, so that the average charge
is the current tuition rate.
Students who do not choose the
degree plan will simply pay each
year those charges fixed in ad-
vance by the board of trustees, as
in the past.
Under the degree plan, a new
student will pay $1,150 the first
year, $1,050 the second year, $950
the third year and $850 the fourth
year. The total cost will be $4000,
or an average of $1000 a year-the
present rate.
GAINESVILLE-Student govern-
ment leaders at the University of
Florida have drawn their academic
life and government work together
in a special political course. The
several stud rats are registered in
ABC 329, "Functions and Practice
of teadership in a Democratic So-
ciety."
The course is open to any upper
division or graduate student now
taking an active role in student
government or related campus ac-
tivities. The course follows a lec-
ture-seminar pattern.
According to Prof. W. W. Young,
the course chairman, this program
is designed to "acquaint the stu-
dent who expects a role of leader-
-ship in governmental affairs with
in a democratic society."
BOULDER-The faculty of the
arts and sciences college at the
University of Colorado has voted
revisions in the language gradua-
tion requirements aimed at en-
couraging students to continue in
the same language study in which
they have done work in high
school.
The objectives of this change,
according to Dean Kenneth Clark,
are to improve general working
proficiency in a foreign language
and to allow appropriate place-
ment procedures by the various
language departments for stu-
dents having previous knowledge
of a language.

Prof. Kelly noted that the basic
d criteria used in the selection of
- applicants includes maturity,
. adaptability, tolerance of change,
V patience, friendliness, ability to
work alone, physical condition and
* motivation to be of service to oth-
ers.
Prof. Kelly served as chief of
selection for the Peace Corps in
Washington during 1962.
First Look
In the first evaluation of orig-
inal applicants, approximately 80
per cent are kept, Prof. Kelly not-
ed. If the applicant is retained, he
is given a code number, and 12
reference forms are sent to per-
sons named by him.
When six of these forms have
been returned, they are evaluated
by an assessment officer and given
a score from zero to five, five be-
ing the highest, he said.
Sixty per cent of these appli-
cants receive scores of 3 to 5, and
this group is considered further.
Spells Out Purpose
Prof. Kelly noted that the over-
all classification procedure is con-
cerned with determining in which
fields an applicant is skilled.
These skills are tabulated with
the requirements for each coun-
try and each job. Scores are as-
signed to each individual and the
results are again tabulated.
Finally, before the applicant is
invited to training, his folder is
again reviewed, in case additional
information has been gained since
the computer tape was prepared
and in case there has been any
change in the applicant's prefer-
ences, Prof. Kelly said.
Several Month Duration
The training program lasts two
to three months, Prof. Kelly said.
During training, as well as before,
the applicant is being continually
evaluated as to personality and
skills.
Only after training is he finally
accepted as a volunteer.
The program's success is indicat-
ed by the fact that less than five
per cent of those who finally go
overseas will return before their
two-year assignment is over, Prof.
Kelly said.
Self-Selection
The conditions of service in the
Corps resiilt in a great deal of
self-selection by the applicants.
Corps people are not allowed dip-
lomatic immunity, may resign at
any time they wish, must speak a
foreign language and are given no
salary, only a subsistence allow-
ance of $75 per month.
Prof. Kelly noted that in his
year with the Corps "there was
always an urgent atmosphere, even
more so than in the armed forces
during the Second World War."
Folk Song Group
To Sing at Hill
The New Christy Minstrels will
give a concert at 8:30 p.m. today
at Hill Aud. The group consists of
eight men and two women who
sing folk songs. Their performance
is sponsored by the Pershing Rifles.

v

PROF. E. LOWELL KELLY
...selection procedures
He attributed this urgency to early
doubts about the value of the pro-
gran.
He said that promoting world
peace through providing needed
services, showing foreigners an im-
age of a working American and
helping educate Americans them-
selves to their responsibilities of
world citizenship are the prime
purposes of the Peace Corps.
Urges Limits
He noted that he had urged that
the program be limited only to
qualified applicants, even if Con-
gress increased the Corps' appro-
priation. He estimated $9000 as
the total cost per year of training
a Corpsman and maintaining him
overseas.
Prof.Kelly originally partici-
pated in the Corps because he was
convinced that the concept was
right. Noting that he felt that a
key factor in its success was its
selection procedures, he explained,
"I wanted to do something con-
crete in a program designed to im-
prove a very complex international
situation."

Group Head
Cites Rise
In .Budget
Allen W. McCarthy, director of
development at the University,
yesterday announced a $15,000 in-
crease in the Development Coun-
cil's budget for last year at the
joint board meeting of the Devel-
opment Council and the Alumni
Fund.
The Alumni Fund reported
$703,000 as calender receipts for
1962. Gifts for the calendar year
1963 through September were $33,_
900 for the President's Fund;
$480.00 for research equipment;
$17,400 for student loans; $10,600
for scholarships and student aid,
$266,800 in other designated gifts
and $139,900 in undesignated gifts.
Vice-President for Finance Wil-
bur K. Pierpont said emphasis
would be placed on getting new
memberships for the President's
Club in the coming year. Eligibil-
ity for membership in the Presi-
dent's Club rests upon a cash
gift of $10,000 or more payable
immediately. Membership may also
be attained through a payment of
at least $1,000 a year for ten
years or a deferred gift of $15,000.
There are currently 177 mem-
bers of the club.
The Law School fund of the De-
velopment Council, which is cur-
rently in its third .year, reported
that as of yesterday the 1963
fund had received $43,700 which
is approximately half of the total
sum the fund received in total
gifts last year.
U -MSU Students
To Mix at Quad
A University-Michigan State
University mixer will take place
from 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. today in all'
four dining halls of East Quad-
rangle. Sponsored by Assembly
Association and the Inter-Quad-7
rangle Council, the event will be3
free.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12
Day Calendar
Annual Development Council Confer-
ence-Session: Mich. Union, 9:00 a.m.
Football-U-M vs. Mich. State Univ.:
Mich. Stadium, 1:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Stratford Canadian
Players in "Oepidus Rex": Architecture
Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
U-M Professional Theatre Program-
APA Broadway Theatre Company in
"Much Ado About Nothing": Trueblood
Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Pershing Rifles Concert--New Christy
Minstrels: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Doctoral Examination for William Jo-
seph DeSua, Comparative Literature;
thesis: "Dante Into English," today, 848
E. Univ. St., at 2 p.m. Co-Chairmen, G.
G. Cambon and Austin Warren.
General Notices
Nursing 100: There will be a meeting
Mon., Oct. 14, 3:30-4:30 p.m. in Room
M5330 Medical Science Bldg.
Mrs. Adrea Keyes, director of Volun-
teer Services, Univ. Hospital, will be the
speaker,
Preclassification: All students In
School of Nursing who have not made
an appointment to preclassify for spring
semester, please call receptionist at
School of Nursing 663-1531, Ext. 7163, to
make an appointment.
Admission Test for Graduate Study in
Business: Application blanks for the
SAdmission Test for Grad. Study inrBusi-
ness are now available in 122 Rackham
Bldg. The first administration of the
test for 1963-65 will be on Nov. 2. Ap-
plications must be received in Prince-
ton, New Jersey by Oct. 19.
The Next Meeting of the Literary Col-
lege Steering Committee will be held in
Room 1220 Angell Hall this coming
Mon., Oct. 14, at 4 p.m.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance
Co., Detroit, Mich.-Salesmen for field
sales of life insurance. 2 yrs. college or
graduate (Lib. Arts). Some sales exper.
required. Trng. prog. of 1% yrs. with

follow-up. Sell financial planning
services. Limited travel. Need own car.
Future oppor. for mgmt. positions &
relocation. Possible to take part-time
employment while furthering educ.
First National Bank & Trust Co.,
Kalamazoo, Mich.-Seeking men with
management potential to advance with
a growing Banking organization. Should
be approx. 23-35 yrs. old with business
bkgds. or have a sincere interest in
considering Banking as a career.
City of New York-Planner BS in
City Planning, Engrg., Arch., Landscape
Arch., Publ. Admin., Econ., Soc., Stat.,
Geog. Law & 6 yrs. exper. Examination
will be held on Feb. 14, 1964 in N.Y.C.
Must apply by Nov. 27.
Swift & Co., Chicago, Ill.-Various
openings including: 1) Advertising-3
yrs. exper. in Indust. products adv.
Consider recent grad if has had strong
educ. bkgd. in Adv. & 2 yrs. of college
chem. 2) Automation Specialist-ME
plus 8-10 yrs. exper. 3) Manager Trainee
-Dairyr &poultry products-recent col-
lege grads - any major. 4) Foreign
Trainee-Recent grads, pref. those who
have lived abroad, to train from 12 to 18
mos. in U.S. & then go overseas-start
in sales & work toward sales mgmt. 5)
Operations Res. Div.-Major in Math.
combined with trng. in phys. sciences,
stat., or business & econ. 6) Bacteriolo-
gist-young woman-recent grad-De-
gree in Bacti. required.
Baltimore, Md. Civil Service-Sanitar-
ian-Degree with major in Chem., Phys-
ics, Biology, or Engrg. Apply by Oct. 18.
* * *
For further information, please call,
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.

ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER- Procter & Gamble Co., Research &
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please Dv., Central Engrg., Central Ind. En-
sign interview schedule posted at 128-H grg., Ivorydale (Cincinnati) & 12 other
W. Engrg. for appts. with the following: U.S. Plants, International Div.-Ail De-
OCT. 14-15--- grees: ChE & IE. BS-MS: CE, EE, EM, &
American Oil Co., Mfg. Dept., whiting, ME. BS: E Physics. MS: Instruuenta-
Ind.; Woodriver, Ill.; Mandan, N. Dako- tion. R. & D., Des., Prod., Corp. Ind.
ta; Salt Lake City, Utah; Yorktown, Engrg., Sys. Analysis & Operations Res.
Va.; Texas City, Texas & others-All OCT. 14-
Degrees: ChE, CE & ME. Men only ex- Hooker Chemical Corp., Montague,
cept for chem. Engrg. can consider Mich.-BS: ChE. Dec. grads. Prod.
women. Mig. Litton Systems, Inc., Guidance & Con-
OCT. 14-16- trol Systems, Woodland Hills & Bev-
Bell Telephone System, All Locations erly Hills, Calif.-All Degrees: EE, E
-All Degrees: EE, IE. BS-MS: EM, Math. Mech's., ME & Met. Dec. grads. Men &
ME. Met. BS: E Math, Sci. Engrg. & Women. R. & D., Des., Prod.
Physics. Men & Women. R. & D., Des., Sperry, Rand Research Center, Re-
Prod. & Mgmt. search Facility, Sudbury, Mass.-PhD:
OCT. 14- Commun. Set., EE, E Mech's., Meteor.
Beloit Corp., Beloit, Wis.-BS-MS: ME. Men & Women. R. & D.
Dec. grads. R. & D., Des., Sales, 'Appli-
cation Engrg., Trng. Prog. ! !'!!'
Cele e e
Clnas nsCorp.,ofAmerica, All cor- O G N Z TO
porate locations, primarily N.J.,ASouth-
east, Southwest-All Degrees: ChE. BS- n # N IZ T O
MS ME. BS: E. Men and (Women- NOTICES
grad level). R. & D., Des., Prod. & Sales.
Chrysler Corp., Detroit Area - All De -_______________
grees: ChE, CE-(Auto. Int.), EE, IE,
ME & Met. BS: E Physics. MS-PhD: Congr. Disc.-E & R Stud. Guild, After-
hyi c. grads. R. & D., Des game cider & donuts, Oct. 12; Seminar:
FaibakI rse& ECo.,Beloit,Wis.- "Interpretation of the Old Testament,"
BS-MS: Es, IS & ME. Men & Women. Oct. 13, 9:30 a.m.; 802 Monroe.
R. & D., Des., Prod. & Sales. * , ,
OCT. 14-15-- Unitarian Student Group, Talk & Dis-
Ford Motor Co., All Co. Components cussion, Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m., Unitarian
Country-wide-All Degrees: EM, IE, ME, Church. Speaker: Subash Chandra-Ba-
Met., Chem. & Physics. Prof.: Applied su, Grad student from India, "Hindu-
Mech's. BS, MS & Prof.: ChEm. MS :Coin- ism."
mun. Set. BS-MS: BE. ES: S Math, E-
Physics & Set. E. MS-PhD: Instrumen-
tation. Dec. grads. R. & D., Des., Prod.
& Sales. IU- M Players

I

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN.
.........::" {4:? ...... ........................ .....:.r:::. ..::.Lvo:._h:v:,.}::::....:vv.: ,.......

Dept. of Speech

MOLIERE'S
extravagant farce
THE MISER
Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre
Wed.-Sat., Oct. 16-19
$1.50 *1$1.00*
Why pay more for less?
Save your money!
See "The Miser" and get
your money's worth
Valuable fun !
"Fri. and Sat. 25c
additional
Individual performances
on sale Monday

I
V

Make Union Pipe Repairs

/

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

.=.

CAE

'(0

J G lut

ON

U H E

ENDING
TONIGHT

"A Complete
Creation
-dealing with the
hungers, pains
and joys of youth in
terms of compassionate
understanding and
truth, underlined
by haunting tenderness,
subtle sophistication and
mature wisdom I"
"-Jd;th Crisr)IHerold Trifwne

DIAL
8-6416

a
i

EXACTING EXCAVATION-Progress continues on the repairs
being made beneath the Michigan Union's side entrance. The re-
pairs consist of replacing hot water pipes with hot air pipes in or-
der to facilitate the melting of snow above ground. The hot water
pipes were unable to withstand underground pressure.

DIAL 5-6290

ENDING TUESDAY
Prices-This Attraction Only
Matinees-$1 .00
Eves. & Sun.-$1,25

r SATYAJIT RAY'S /
wo
Daugtrn

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Meeting in the Ann Arbor Y.M,-Y.W.C.A
at 5th and Williams
Rev. Jesse Northweather, Pastor
Phone 668-9894
SUNDAY-
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:00 a'm. Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m. Training Union.
7:30 p.m. Evening Worship.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Meeting in Room 528D
in basement of S.A.B.
Monday-7:00 to 8:00 p.m. Bible Study.
Thursday-5:10 to 5:40 p.m. Vesper Service.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Woshtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 A.M. and 12 Noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 and 512 E. Huron-663-9376
Rev. James H. Middleton-Senior Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light-Campus Minister
Mr. David Backus--Student Intern
Saturday-Cider and doughnuts after the game,
Campus Center Lounge.
SUNDAY
6:45 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship, Campus Center Lounge.
11:00 am. Morning Worship.
6:45 p.m. "Christianity andpCulture in In-
dia," Mr. L. G. Benny, Speaker, Campus
Center Lounge.
Monday, 12 Noon. Luncheon Discussion, Cam-
pus Center Lounge.
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. Midweek worship and
discussion, First Baptist Church.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all services-
Call NO 2-2756
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry O. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY-
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Worship Services.
_4:00 p.m. Bible Study.
7:00 p.m. Speaker: Dr. Paul Doerring, Psy-
chologist, Merrill Palmer Institute, Detroit.
Wednesday-7:30-8:00 p.m. Vespers.
Friday-8:00 p.m. Swimming Party-Meet at
Center.

LOUI JOUDAN-ELSA MARTINELLI
MARGARET RUTHERFORD-MAGGIE SMITH
ROD TAYLOR AND ORSON WELLES

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
- Minister-Hoover Rupert
Campus Minister-Eugene Ransom
Associate Campus Minister-Jean Robe
SUNDAY
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 11:15 a.m.
"Bring Jonah Up to Date"-Dr. Rupert.
10:15 a.m.-Student Seminar, Methodist So-
cial Creed, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m. - Worship and Program. Small
group discussion on Religious Poetry.
TUESDAY
8:30-1 1:00 p.m.-Open House, Miss Jean
Robe's apartment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, follow-
ed by breakfast.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads-Picnic Supper and
Program.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1 511 Washtenow Avenue
663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
John Koenig, Vicar
Saturday, 4:00 to 5:00: Open House after
MSU game.
SUNDAY
9:45 and 11:15 a.m. Worship Services, Ser-
mon by the pastor, "High Noon at So-
maria."
9:45 and 11:15 a.m. Bible Classes.
:00 p.m. Gamma Delta Supper and Pro-
gram. Talk by Prof. Wilbert Rusch, head
of Science Dept. at Concordia, "Science
and Biblical Theology."
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m. Midweek Devotion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
For Transportation Call 2-2756
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11 :00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty. Reading room hours are 10.00
A.M. to 5:00 P.M. daily, except Sunday
and Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00 P.M.

.4

COMING
SUNDAY:

"Carry On Regardless"

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ARE YOU REALLY SURE?
Students and Faculty,
Find Out What's Playing At
Cinemna qutildQ

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It

hwAtAV V:ION n :0 M ET:OC 7:OLO9RP.M
Shows at 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:10 P.M.

DIAL A STARTING TODAY
2-6264 ,Shows at 1:00-2:45
2644:50-6:50 & 9:00
SOPHIA [OREN MAXIMILIAN SCHELL

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it

FREDRIC MARCHIROBERT WAGNER

I

WHAT
-, IlHAPPPl~Irn

I

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9;30 annd 10:45 avm. Worship Service.

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 West Liberty Street
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Adult Instruction Class and Adult Bible Class-
9:45 a.m.
Church School-9:35 a.m.
8:30 and l11:00 a m.-Mornina, Wrship.

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