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August 27, 1963 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-08-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i

'U,

Medical

Center

Provides

Statewide Servic

)JAM(
1ft
717 N
EWEl.

)NDS

WATCHES

HALLE R' S
fewue/eri
TO THE STUDENTS OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
5 Years: 1858 8 to1963
We welcome the Old Students and
invite the New Students to our store,
located just North of Main Campus.
. University - near Hill Auditorium
COLLEGE JEWELRY

The University Medical Center,
a sprawling complev of buildings,
provides an important statewide
teaching and patient care service.
In recent years the shift in state
population and the dispersal of
physicians and facilities through-
out the state has placed greater
emphasis on the region as the
prime service area. Approximately
80 per cent of all Medical Center
patients come from within a 100
mile radius.
The buildings of the center are
located on a hill overlooking the
Huron River valley. Included in
this area are the several hospitals
and clinics-University Hospital,
Outpatient Clinic, Women's Hos-
pital, Neuropsychiatric Institute,
Kresge Medical Research Build-
ing, Children's Psychiatric Hospi-
tal, Simpson Memorial Institute,
and the Lloyd Radiation Therapy
Center.
The Medical Center area has
been the site of new construction

Y n

activity almost continuously since
the end of World War II.'
In 1958 the three-unit Medical
Science-School of Nursing Build-
ing was opened. It houses the
School of Nursing, administrative
offices of the Medical School, and
the departments of Pathology,'
Pharmacology, and Biochemistry.
A second unit to house remaining
departments of the Medica l
School is proposed and funds have
been requested from the Legisla-
ture. Late in 1959 the Mental.
Health Research Building was oc-
cupied and at present the Kresge
Hearing Research Institute build-
ing is being completed.
It is the world's largest medical
laboratory devoted exclusively to
research on hearing. The cost of
the facility is estimated at $1,750,-
000 which was started with a
$200,000 grant from the Kresge
Foundation.
Kresge Grants Aid
The Kresge Medical Research
Building was built in 1951 with a
grant of $3 million, just west of
the University Hospital. The build-
ing was designed to achieve a
three-fold . objective. It provides
facilities for research in problems
related to medicine and the aux-
iliary health services; it provides
training for a carefully selected
group of men and women who
have research ambitions and apti-
tudes and who have the necessary
scientific background; it brings

theory, and practice together by
increasing the efficiency of medi-
cal education.
The Radiation Therapy Center,
located underground in a passage-
way connecting the hospital with
the Kresge Research Building, is
not only financed by the Univer-
sity Hospital but also by the Phoe-
nix Project, the University's me-
morial to the war dead which is
concerned with putting the atom
to work in peaceful projects. The
Center is being operated under a
contract with the Atomic Energy
Commission which has given ap-
proval for the use of radioactive
cobalt and cesium-137 for cancer
patients.
Physical Development
Iu July, 1960 upon consultation
with the Campus Plan Advisory
Committee, the Regents author-
ized a study of the Medical Center
which would serve, as a guide to
future physical development. The
planning report, released last De-
cember, said "the Medical Center
in the future will expand its
facilities to a size significantly lar-
ger than its present size.
"This growth will occur in vary-
ing magnitudes in each of the
three major functional areas of
the Center: instruction, patient-
care, and research. High priority
should be given to instruction or
academic medicine, strengthening
the relationships between the
Medical Center and Central Cam-
pus," the report said.F

rRy

WATCH REPAIRING

~J1

il

B'nai 3'ritF HiEY Fon Cdtion
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

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We are pleased to announce the outline of our program for 1963-64
(5724)
ORI ENTATION
Friday, Aug. 30, 7:30 p.m. Welcome Sabbath Service-
Followed by Oneg Shabbat
Saturday, Aug. 31, 9:00 a.m. Morning Services-
Mon., Sept. 2, 7:30 p.m. Hillel Mixer-Dancing, Refreshments
Members-free Non-members-$1
Art Bartner Orchestra
HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES (in Rackham Lecture Hall Auditorium)

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'i/edconew
TO ALL OF YOU NEW
MICHIGAN STUDENTS
Please make yourself

at home in

.:.

the two

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JOHN L EI DY

Shops-and,. good
in Ann Arbor

luck

DOCTORS AND PILLS-The sprawling Medical Center complex is situated on a hill overlooking the
Huron River valley. Containing hospitals for women and children in addition to University Hospital
the center serves patients from within a hundred mile radius. It also contains the Kresge Hearing Re-
search Institute building, the world's largest medical laboratory devoted to hearing research.
SOCIAL RESEARCH:
Institute Studies Man Within Society

The University Institute for So-
cial Research is one of the focal
points for research in the social
sciences on and off the campus.
The ISR is divided into two
main sections: the Center for
Group Dynamics and the Survey
Research Center. They are sup-
ported by funds from the govern-
ment, grants from. foundations,
given by private organizations
and contracts, which include funds
and businesses to do particular
projects.
The Center for Group Dynam-
ics aims its investigations toward
gaining insight into the numer-
ous groupings of human beings
which are included within this
complex society. They study such
specifics as what groups are, how
they interact, why and when they
form and how change comes
about.
Various Divisions
Under the Center for , Group
Dynamics are divisions dealing
with Children, Youth and Family
Life and with Mental Health in
Industry. The latter studies the

relative mental and emotional
situations of subordinates and
superiors and how interaction af-
fects each, along with ways to in-
crease productivity and efficiency.
The Survey Research Center is
also divided into divisions deal-
ing with particular problems and
questions. Organizational. Behavior
deals with the individual within
the organization. e '
Organizational Change studies
and at times recommends the
ways in which an organization
can be changed by altering the.
relations between underlings and
bosses.
Studies Attitudes
Communication and Influence
delves into the question of how
groups and the individuals com-
posing them revamp their atti-
tudes and behavior. One study of
juvenile delinquency viewed how
the group has influence over in-
dividuals..
Political Behavior studies the
voting habits and .practices cor-
related with attitudes and other

factors. The group was the only
survey in the country to accurately
predict the Truman victory. They
also have studied the correlation
of votes of congressmen and the
feeling of their constituency.
Economic Behavior is concerned
with the consumer, rather than
Gross National Product or sales.
Their quarterly reports do not
predict or give facts to any -
ticular group, but thesex evies
of economic conditions are used
by American businesses and pro-
ducers.
Investigates Students
The Student Development pro-
ject is a seven-year study of stu-
dents at the University and is de-
signed to discover what and how
attitudes are changed by a col-
lege experience.
The ISR is administered separ-
ately from the teaching depart-
ments of the University, but is
closely allied with them through
mutual research interests and
through sharing .of some teaching
and other professional activities.

JOHN 1TLEIDIY

Rosh Hashana, Sept. 18-20
Wednesday evening,F
Thursday,
Friday,
Yom Kippur, Sept. 28
Friday evening, Kol Nidre,
Saturday,

Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.

18,
19,
20,

7:30 p.m.
9:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m.

Phone NO 8-6779

* 601 East Liberty

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d

27,7:00 p.m.
28, 9:00 a.m.

Reform Services at B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill St.

First day Rosh Hashana,
Yom Kippur,

Sept. 19,
Sept. 28,

10-12 a.m.
10-12, 3-5

YEAR-AROUND ACTIVITIES
"Wednesday Evenings at 8" (Lectures by Faculty)
Rabbi-Student Discussion Series
WEEKLY SABBATH SERVICES-Fridays at 7:30 (conducted by students
from Hillel organizations, Fraternities & Sororities)
Saturdays at 9:00 a.m.
Israeli Folk Dancing-Nagila Dancers
Theatre Hillel
Saturday Evening Parties
A special note:
Sun.-Thurs., The HILLEL LIBRARY is open evenings for study
and reference use during the school year.
SPECIAL EVENTS INCLUDE
SUKKOT OPEN HOUSE
ZWERDLING LECTURESHIP in Jewish Studies
HILLELZAPOPPIN' (Benefit, UJA)
ANNUAL FACULTY LATKE-HAMANTASH DEBATE
STUDY GROUPS
Hebrew-Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced
Others to be announced
SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS
SZO (Student Zionist Organization)
ATID
KOSHER MEALS
SUNDAY NIGHT SUPPER CLUB (delicatessen)
Dinners, by subscription, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday evenings
All students are invited to identify themselves with HILLEL, to enjoy its
facilities, program and personnel, to join committees and to affiliate
as members.
-HILLEL STUDENT GOVERNMENT
7-63
MAIL TO
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
(Please Print)
Name
last first middle
1

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