100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 03, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 196

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

f

v93 H ...GN.AL PG

U.S., Russia
A ons

May

Ban'

MONETARY FUND:
Ten Nations To Study
International Finances

in

1
{

School Study
Inconclusive
By The Associated Press
EAST LANSING-A study of
seven.Michigan schools, each with
a Negro enrollment of'85 per cent
or mpre, showed contradictory
evaluations of the students by
white and Negro teachers, reports
a Michigan State University pro-
fessor.
"It -turns out we really know
very little about the Negro stu-
dent," said Dr. David Gottlieb, an
associate professor of sociology,
anthropology and education. "Un-
fortunately, most of the research
into the Negro student has been
on delinquency."
Negro teachers described the
Negro pupil as "happy, energetic
and fun-loving." White teachers,
in the schools-who made up
slightly more than 50 per cent of
the teaching staffs-termed the
students "talkative, lazy and re-
d bellious," Gottlieb said.
"These teachers were talking
about the same kids," Gottlieb
- said. "Now the question is" are
they both right-or who is right?"
"It may be possible," he said,
that a Negro student responds
differently to a Negro teacher than
a white teacher, just as adults re-
spond differently to those of other
races.''
Studies in the Michigan schools,
Gottlieb reported, also showed Ne-
gro teachers had greater job sat-
isfaction, more favorable atti-
tudes toward the pupils and par-
ents and tended to come from low-,
er economic backgrounds.
Many of the Negro teachers in-
terviewed, he reported, felt that
white teachers placed in Negro
schools were inferior teachers and
were there because they couldn't
qualify for white schools.
Gottlieb also reported on a study
he made as a member of, a nine-
member Committee of the United
States Office of Education, com-
paring Negroes in segregated
schools in a Texas community with
their counterparts in integrated
schools in northern urban areas.

Cambridge Vote Defeats
City Anti-Bias Measure
CAMBRIDGE, Md. (RP)-In an atmosphere of quiet despair,
Cambridge officials are groping for another answer to the racial
dilemma threatening the life of their city.
What they had hoped would be a temporary answer lay buried
in the vote returns from Tuesday's historic referendum.
By a 1,994 to 1,720 count, the people of Cambridge disapproved
a town charter amendment. Aimed chiefly at preventing restaurants
'-from denying services to Negroes,
it also would apply to hotels and

leek ulues

In Bombing
BIRMINGHAM (P)-State inves-
tigators seeking clues in Birming-
ham's racial bombings discovered
yesterday 133 sticks of dynamite
-enough to demolish a block-
square wooden frame building.
"We are stepping in the right
direction. We are making pro-
gress," said Col. Albert J. Lingo,
Alabama public safety director.
Lingo has assumed command of
the state's investigation of recent
bombings including one which
killed four Negro girls attending
Sunday school.
Army demolition experts esti-
mated that the dynamite found
last night could, if placed properly,
destroy a wooden fraiiie building
one block square.
Lingo declined to say what his
next step might be. But he in-
dicated valuable evidence was ob-
tained in the dynamite find.
"Not all of the dynamite came
from .the same manufacturer, in-
dicating it was taken from two
different sources," he said.
Trial for three white men 'on
charges connected with Birming-
ham racial bombings was set to-
day for next Wedneday after-
noon.
The three are Robert E. Chain-
bliss, Charles Cagle and John Wes-
ley Hall.

motels.
r Bitterness Deepens
The defeat of the 'mendment
passed by city council last July 1'
deepened bitterness which has be-
set 'the 12,000 *residents of the
community for months.
Government officials said it was
the nation's first public vote on the
question, which embraces issues
even now before the Supreme
Court in a case involving a Bal-
timore restaurant and an amuse-
ment park in the Maryland su-
biirbs of Washington, D.C.
The vote was held against a
background of national guards-
men continuing a 3%Y2-month oc-
cupation to prevent renewed out-
breaks of racial violence.
Many Problems
Once an issue pitting white
against Negro, the proposal evolv-
ed into a myriad of problems in-
cluding racial ,prejudice, economic
survival, a tarnished national im-
age and several political power
struggles in both the white and
Negro camps.
In what seemed to be the cli-
max, a coalition of white and
Negro leaders submerged personal
and racial differences to. try to
gain approval of the amendment.
Lined up against them were two
groups, one Negro and the other
white, which feared approval
would mean erosion of rights.
Mrs. Gloria Richardson, Negro
chairman of the Cambridge non-
violent action' committee, urged
her people to boycott the referen-
dum. She said they should not be
required to vote for a right al-
ready theirs.

~pace,
Agreement
Of Powers
Quite Close
See Less Progress
On Other Questions
UNITED NATIONS ()-Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gro-
myko expressed belief yesterday
that the United States and the
Soviet Union were near agreement
on keeping nuclear weapons from
being put into orbit'in outer space.
Talking to newsmen in advance
of a dinner meeting with Secre-
tary of State Dean Rusk, Gromy-
ko declared that the positions of
the United States and Soviet gov-
ernments coincide on this issue
and that agreement is possible.
In the banning of nuclear weap-
ons from outer space is one of
the steps under discussions be-
tween the two foreign ministers as
a follow-up to the limited nuclear
test ban and the Moscow-Wash-
ington "hot line."
Agreement Possible
"The question is promising,"
Gromyko said. "Agreement is quite
possible. In substance, I think our
views coincide-the views of the
United States government and our
government."
Gromyko was less optimistic
about agreement on two other pro-
posals, the stationing of observers
in central Europe to guard against
surprise attack and a curb on the
dissemination of nuclear weapons
to countries not now possessing
them.
On the observer question, he
said:
"It depends on the position of
the Western powers. There is jus-
tification for agreement if they
are objective-if they do not try
to put a one-sided understanding
on this matter."
Non-Distribution Policy
United States diplomatic sources
say all the atomic powers follow a
policy of not distributing nuclear
weapons to nations not possessing
them. But the sticking point in
any agreement as far as Gromy-
ko is concerned is the United
States proposal for a multi-nation
seaborne Polaris force under NA-
TO. Gromyko claims this will put
nuclear weapons in the hands of
the Germans.
UnitedaStates sources said in ad-
vance that Rusk planned to press
again for removal of Russian
troops from Cuba, then go over
with Gromyko a long list of possi-
ble United States-Soviet accords
ranging from trade to cooperation
in space.
Ticketed for discussion also were
more general East-West questions,
mainly in the disarmament field.
Rusk, British Foreign Secretary
Lord Home and Gromyko are slat-
ed for a second and final three-
way parley tonight before Home's
departure for London.
Little progress has been an-
nounced from the meetings so far
although their tone has been cor-
dial enough.
Western diplomats warned
against expecting any quick solu-
tions to longstanding cold war
problems. They said neither side
appears ready to move fast yet,
but cntinuing the contacts is a
good thing in itself and some po-
tential area of agreement may yet
be found.
Bringing up the United States
dislike of the continued Russian
presence in Cuba has been stan-

dard United States diplomatic
practice in talks with the Soviets
since last fall's missiles crisis.
Claims Pirates
Raze Saw Mill

WASHINGTON (,')-A group of
10 wealthy nations said yesterday
they probably will rely on exist-
ing machinery to propel any new
steps toward strengthening the
world of international finance.
Secretary of the Treasury Doug-
las Dillon, temporary chairman of
a "gioup 'of 10" nations, said the
study of his group would work
without friction alongside an in-
quiry set up by the International
Monetary Fund.
Although Dillon said the manag-
ing director of the fund, Pierre-
Paul Schweitzer, had given his
blessing to the 10-nation study, he
made it clear that the inquiry
would not be limited to possible
actions which might be taken "in
and through the fund."
Hedging Statements
In carefully hedged statements
suited to the world of internation-
al finance, Dillon and others at
the international conclave have
made it clear that they do not in-
tend to change the price of gold or
abandon the system of fixed ex-
change rates.
The combined meeting of the
boards of the World Bank and the
International Monetary Fund has
produced strong support for the
two parallel studies of "interna-
tional liquidity"-the gold, curren-
cy or credit used as a means of
payment between governments.
Common Sense
Although Dillon described the
fund study as limited to possible
uses of the fund itself, Schweitzer
said it would be bounded only "by
the limits of common sense."
He said conclusions probably
would be reached by spring, so
that delegates could then report
to their respective countries in
time for action by next fall's
meeting of the Fund in Tokyo. The
study will be headed by Robert V.
Roosa, United States undersecre-
tary of the Treasury for monetary
affairs.

October 24,

25,

rVII

DOUGLAS DILLON
... chairs study
RADIO, TV:
Bill Passes
WASHINGTON (;)-The Senate
passed by voice vote yesterday, a
bill to clear the way for radio
and television debates by the
Democratic and Republican pres-
idential candidates next year.
The measure would suspend for
the 60 days immediately 'preceding
the Nov. 3 election in 1964 the
requirement of the federal com-
munications act that broadcasting
stations provide equal time for all
candidates for a public office if
time to the major party candidates.
The practical effect is to per-
mit broadcasters to give or sell
time to the major party candidates

/

T

Everyone's
talking
about
IPAJA.MA GAME

26

'. I

d

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
SCARBOROUGH, England - Anthony Greenwood was elected
last night as chairman of the British Labor Party for the coming year.
Greenwood, 52, had been vice chairman since February. He has
long been identified with left-wing sections of the party, notably on
nuclear disarmament.

,,EODORANT

11

JOHANNESBURG-Ethiopian Airlines has announced that
fective at once it will refuse to transport to or from Ethiopiao

ef-
any

Here's deodorant protection
YO'U CAN TRUST
Old Spice Stick Deodorant...fastest, neatest way to all.
day, every day protection! It's the man's deodorant pre-
ferred by men...absolutely dependable. Glides on
smoothly, speedily... dries in record time. Old Spice Stick
Deodorant - most convenient, most economical deodorant

,.

a - p

ORCHESTRA AUDITIONS FOR "THE BOY FRIEND"
this evening at 10:00
UNION HOBBY SHOP (side entrance, then immediately right)
looking for: Brass, Reeds that double, Violins, and Banjo.
Must be Non-union Musicians.

a

passengers with South African0-
passports.
VATICAN CITY - Vatican
sources said yesterday that Roman
Catholic Ecumenical C o u n c 11
authorities were studying the pos-
sibility of admitting women to the
assembly.
S. .
UNITED NATIONS - Foreign
Minister Golda Meir of Israel call-
ed on all Middle East countries to
enter into negotiations aimed' at
complete disarmament in the re-
gion under mutual inspection.
RANGOON-Seventy per cent
of Rangoon's shops are closed in
protest against the revolutionary
government's income tax policy.
Under new regulations shop-
keepers are required to maintain
up to 10 prescribed forms and
registers.
SINGAPORE -Indonesian ter-
rorists are penetrating deeper into
Sarawak, a state in the new fed-
eration of Malaysia, the British
army reports.
*
VIETIANE - Guns have been
booming again on the Plaine Des
Jarres of east central Laos after
more than three months of brood-
ing quiet.
NEW YORK-Despite extreme
weakness in New York Central
and Pennsylvania Railroads, the
stock market remained pretty
much on an even keel yesterday.
Dow-Jones averages showed 30 in-
dustrials down .39, 20 railroads
down .32,15 utilities down .38, and
65 stocks down .33.

A

ANN ARBOR'S
FINEST
PAPERBACK
BOOK DEPT.!
5000 TITLES
BROWSE AT
FOLLETT'S

STICK
DEODORANT
S Hu LO N

I

_I

t
i

i

money can buy.1.00 plus tax.

CHRISTMAS FLIGHT
toEUROPE
ROUND TRIP -$
December 22-New York to Paris
January 12-Paris to New York
FOR ALL: Call: NO 5-8394 or NO 8-7720
STUDENTS Or write: MR. KLAUS HAAS
MR. JOHN SHURMAN
FACULTY 820 McKinley, Apt. 3
EMPLOYEES Ann Arbor, Michigan
a 554

rI..
ItI
- 4 ,-.

.
jc.j

I

I

HAVANA (iP)-The Cuban armed
forces ministry announced yester-
day the destruction of a saw mill
at Cayo Guin, on the north coast
of Oriente Province, by a ship it
called a pirate.
A communique said the vessel
slipped into the area under cover
of darkness early Tuesday, de-
stroyed the mill and escaped to
the north. The British-ruled Ba-
hama Islands lie north of Cayo
Guin.
A Havana dispatch relayed by
the Soviet news agency Tass said
the ship opened up with shellfire
at about 2:50 a.m. It called this
"a new piratic attack on the
Freedom island."
Cuban exiles staged three such
hit-and-run raids on Cuban tar-
gets in four days in August.

Friday Noon Luncheon
Discussion
The Guild House
802 MONROE
"The Fair Housing Myth
In Ann Arbor"
Brereton Bissell
Re port of Factual Study

'I

I

I

LUNCH 25c

I

'.1 .

classics by
- a *

k u - U U kAA t

I

11

N our JIRa. U.F Pn vsvE l n n#U3'MfUnRrhIA' 1 u iim 111'-'5,.- PinleUof0? to anaI

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan