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October 01, 1963 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Hickey Resigns San Francisco Post

SAN FRANCISCO OP) - Be-
leaguered Red Hickey quit as
coach of the winless San Fran-
cisco 49ers yesterday and was re-
placed for the rest of the year
by assistant coach Jack Chris-
tiansen, a specialist with the de-
fensive secondary.
Hickey handed his resignation
to club owner Vic Morabito Mon-
day morning and in mid-afternoon
Morabito appointed Christiansen
to the job.
Christiansen, an eight-year de-
fensive halfback with the Detroit
Lions, joined the 49ers in 1959 as
an assistant-the same year Hick-
ey became head coach.
Became Favorite
During the few hours of specu-
lation before Christiansen was
named coach, he quickly became
the favorite, at least to finish out
the year.
The former Colorado State
sprinter is popular with the team
and, on such . short notice, the
49ers did not have too far to look
beyond the staff of assistants.
As .a player he was named all-
pro six seasons, starring as a
kick return specialist and pass
defender.
Hickey's departure was expect-
ed, though many observers
thought it would not come until
the end of the season, when the
redhead's three-year contract ex-
pires.
But when the Minnesota Vikings
smothered the 49ers 45-14 Sunday,
Hickey took his big step.
Neither Hickey nor Morabito
was available for comment after
Harder Axed
As Cleveland
Hires WVnn
o/
CLEVELAND (A") - Pitching
coach Mel Harder, whose 36 con}-
secutive seasons with the Cleve-
lard Indians was a tenure record
in major league baseball, was
fired yesterday.
He will be succeeded next year
by Early Wynn, a 43-year-old
right-hander who won one game
-the 300th of his major league
career--while losing two with the
Indians this season.

their Monday morning meeting,
so it could not be determined how
much pressure, if any, Morabito
applied to the-ex-coach.
But with five exhibition losses,
three regular season defeats and
a combined losing streak of 10
games that reached back to 1962,
Hickey was obviously in trouble.
His record in four-plus seasons
at the San Francisco helm was
a dead-even 27-27-1 but only the
1960 season, when the 49ers lost
the NFL's Western Division title
to Green Bay by one game, could
be termed a success.
The club was fourth in Hickey's
initial season of 1959 and fifth the
past two seasons.
His troubles began after the
1960 season when he traded aging

but extremely popular quarter-
back Y. A. Tittle to the New York
Giants. Tittle promptly led the
Giants to two divisional titles.
By 1961 Morabito was forced to
announce: .
"It is regrettable that some
players have not agreed with Red
Hickey and his staff in their
assessment of personnel. Red
knows what he wants and he
fully intends to achieve the de-
sired goal without compromise."
At that time lineman Ed Henke
was asking to be traded and half-
back Hugh McElhenny was blam-
ing a "personality conflict" for
his slowdown.
Rough Taskmaster
Hickey, always known as a
rough taskmaster, tried easing thef

49ers into condition last year
with a no-contact series of early
workouts but a raft of injuries re-
sulted and helped ruin his pre-
season declaration that the 1962
team was his best-ever at San
Francisco.
"It's been a long, frustrating
season," Hickey said after the
1962 closer. "We've got some boys
who are coming on and who are
going to be fine ball players.
Pro
Football

NFL
WESTERN DIVISION
W L T Pet. Pts.

ImM SPORl LIGHT
By Dick Reynolds,
The Old Pro.
The old pro of I-M football is on the prowl again.
For the uninitiated, this title belongs to one Jack Mogk-I-M
quarterback extraordinaire. Back for his seventh year of I-M play,
the balding signal caller looks like he may have another winning ball
club.
After directing Sigma Alpha Epsilon to three football titles in
five years in the social fraternity division, Mogk last year switched
to the graduate leaguel With a mixture of former SAE's and Phi
Delt's he piloted his Draft Dodgers (team) to a 6-0 record and the
grad title.
The affable Law School student has left many an I-M gridder
grasping at thin air with his magician-like moves in the backfield. His
accuracy and range in passing are almost unbelievable.
Realizing his outstanding ability, the I-M Department elected
him to the all-star team three times.
Returning to the Draft Dodgers squad with Mogk this year are
blocking back Fred Roeser, defensive halfback Steve Wittenberg and
center Paul Groffsky.
A prize newcomer to the squad is one of Mogk's top protege's,
Dick Honig. Honig, Michigan's former varsity shortstop and new as-
sistant baseball coach, tutored under Mogk for two years at SAE. The
new addition should give the defending titlist a good 1-2 passing
combination.'
While the Draft Dodgers get the nod as the team to beat in
this year's graduate division race, always tough Nu Sigma Nu and
Phi Delta-Phi may give Mogk's crew a real run for the crown.
The Nu Sigs, still smarting from the 30-0 pasting they took from
the Draft Dodgers in last year's championship game, have quarter-
back Mike Ratterman, another ex-Mogk understudy, along with
speedy ends Les Tillitt and Scotty Boggs.
A 12-0 loser to Draft Dodgers last season, the Phi Delta Phi
has its 1962 team returning almost intact. Quarterback Henry Cashen
will direct the Phid attack with ends Howard (Buc) O'Leary and
Mike Barron andblocking back Dino (Rhino) Rinella lending valuable
support.

Chicago
Minnesota
Green Bay
Detroit
Baltimore
San Francisco
Los Angeles

3
2
2
1
I
0
0

0
x
2
3
3'

0
0
0
0
a
a
0

1.000
.667
.667
.333
.333
.000
.000

75
76
65
54
68
58
22

EASTERN DIVISION
W L T Pet. Pts.'
Cleveland 3 0 0 1.000 98
Pittsburgh 2 0 1 1.000 75
New York 2 1 0 .667 74
St. Louis 2 1 0 .667 72
Washington 2 1 0 .667 72
Philadelphia 0 2 1 .000 59
Dallas 0 3 0 .000 48
SUNDAY'S RESULTS'
Chicago 37, Detroit 21
Green Bay 31, Baltimore 20
Washington 21, Dallas 17
Cleveland 20, Los Angeles 6
New York 37, Philadelphia 14
Pittsburgh 23, St. Louis 10
Minnesota 45, San Francisco 14
AFL
EASTERN DIVISION
W L T Pct. Pts.
New York 2 1 0 .667 48
Boston 2 2 0 .500 81
Houston 2 2 0 ..500 81
Buffalo 0 3 1 .000 74
WESTERN DIVISION
W L T Pet. Pts.
San Diego 3 0 0 1.000 55
Oakland 2 2 0 .500 80
Kansas City 1 1 1 .500 96
Denver 1 2 0 .333 35
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Denver 14, Boston 10
San Diego 24, Kansas City 10
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
New York 10, Oakland 7
Houston 31, Buffalo 20

OP
31
62
40
70
82
89
80
OP
44
31
73
54
68
86
96
OP
62
59
82
107
OP
33
60
58
89

SPORT SHORTS:
U.S. Davis Cuppers Trounce Britain,
By The Associated Press
BOURNEMOUT England -set the previous low of 14 in 1950 run in relief of Don Drysdale in Alston was nursing
Chuck.EMcKinley and Frank but played in 155 contests, the regular season finals but pass- late innings, he oft
Croehi starred Saturday, lead- Aparicio also just missed set- ed him up because Koufax was Tracewski, a smoo
ing the United States over the ting a league record for fielding feeling sub par. second or short.
Bih spercentage, winding up with .981. The Dodgers still were awaiting Houk surprised n
British Davis Cup team, 5-0, to. * * * final word on the physical condi- announcements befc
capture the interzone semi-finals NEW YORK-Ralph Houk pick- tion of Ken McMullen, their rook- out. Downing, a 22-
here. ed Whitey Ford and Al Downing ie third baseman who suffered a was sensational aft
The overwhelming; victory enab- to pitch the first two World Series pulled hamstring muscle Thurs- called from the R
led the Americans to advance to games and gave Jim Bouton, his day. Alston was optimistic about club in June. He
the interzone finals, to be held third starter, a workout yesterday his chances of playing. a 13-5 record, a 2.
in November, against India in while the Los Angeles Dodgers In case McMullen can not make average and 171 stil
Bombay. were flying in for tomorrow's it, the Dodgers will shift Junior innings.
McKinley and Froehling clinch- opener at Yankee Stadium. Gilliam to third base and use Dick The young man
ed the British match with re- Sandy Koufax, the Dodgers' Tracewski, a .226-hitting reserve N.J., completed 10
sounding wins. McKinley topped strikeout ace, who will face Ford infielder, at second. McMullen, four of them shutou
Billy Knight, the British hard- in a most-important battle of left- optioned to Spokane in May, was a forgone conclus
court champion, 8-6, 6-2, 6-3, handers in the opener, was both- recalled in late June and wound up would pitch the seco
while Froehling humbled Mike ered by a slight cold. Manager with a .236 average that included Bouton, a 21-game
Sangster 6-1, 4-6, 6-0, 6-4. Walter Alston had planned to give five homers and 28 runs batted in. Drysdale in the thin
The winner of the United his 25-game winner a short trial During the regular season when Angeles Saturday.
States-India match will face Aus-
tralia, defending Davis Cup
charrp, late in December.
" "
BALTIMORE - The Baltimore
Orioles set two major league club
fielding records during the 1963
season and shortstop Luis Apar-
icio established one American
League mark, according to unoffi-
cial statistics.
The Orioles made 99 errors in
162 gamnes for a fielding percent-
age of .9838. The previous record
of 100 errors and a .9831 percent-
age were set by the Cincinnati
Reds during a 154-game schedule
in 1958.
Aparicio, obtained last winter in
a trade with the Chicago White
Sox, made 13 errors at shortstop
while playing in 144 games. Phil
Rizzuto of the New York Yankees
ON.CAMPUS SALEI DA
§ keep trime
8:45 to 5:10
NICKEL ARCADE ON DIAG AND AT CORNER OF NORTH U. & STATE STREi
URCADE. BARBERSS
NICKELS ARCADE J
See student reps fo r season coupons

Major Leagoue
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
(Final Standings)

II

(By the Author of "Rally Round he Flag, Boyd" and,
"Barefoot Boy With Cheek.")

I

W L Pet.
New York 104 57 .646
Chicago °94 68' .580
Minnesota 91 70 .565
Baltimore 86 76 .531
Detroit 79 83 .488
Cleveland 79 83 .488
Boston 76 853.472
Kansas City 73 89 .451
Los Angeles 70 91 .435
Washington 56 106 .346!
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 7, Baltimore 3
Washington 9, Chicago 2
Cleveland 2, Kansas City 1
Los Angeles at Boston (rain)
Minnesota at New York (rain)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
(Final Standings)

GB
101
13
18%/
2512
28
31/
34
481,E

WORDS: THEIR CAUSE AND CURE
Today let us take up the subject of etymology (or entomology,
as it is sometimes called) which is the study of word origins
(or insects, as they are sometimes called).
Where are word origins (insects) to be found? Well sir, some-
times words are proper names which have passed into the
language. Take, for instance, the words used in electricity:
ampere was named after its discoverer, the Frenchman Andre
Marie Ampere (1775-1836); similarly, ohm was named after
the German G.S. Ohm (1781-1854), watt after the Scot James
Watt (1736-1819), and bulb after the American Fred C. Bulb
(1843-1912).
There is, incidentally, quite a poignant little story about
Mr. Bulb. Until Bulb's invention, all illumination was pro-
vided by gas, which was named after its inventor Milton T. Gas

W L Pet. GB
Los Angeles 99 63 .611 -
St. Louis 93 69 .574 6
San Francisco 88 74 .546 11
Philadelphia 87 75 .537 12
Cincinnati 86 76 .531 13
Milwaukee 84 78 .529 15
Chicago 82 80 .506 17
Pittsburgh' 743 88 .457 25
Houston 66 96 ; .407 33
New York 51 111 .315 48
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 3, Cincinnati 2
Milwaukee 2, Chicago 0
Houston 13, New York 4.
Philadelphia 3, Los Angeles 1
San Francisco 4, Pittsburgh 2

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who, strange to tell, had been Bulb's roommate at Cal Tech!
In fact, strange to tell, the third man sharing the room with
Bulb and Gas was also one whose name burns bright in the
annals of illumination-Walter Candle!
The three roommates were inseparable companions in col-
lege. After graduation all three did research in the problems
of artificial light, which at this time did not exist. All America
used to go to bed with the chickens, and many fine citizens were,
alas, severely injured falling off the roost.
Well sir, the three comrades-Bulb, Gas, and Candle-
promised to be friends forever when they left school, but
success, alas, spoiled all that. First Candle invented the can-
dle, got rich, and forgot his old friends. Then Gas invented gas,
got rich, bankrupted Candle, and forgot his old friends. Then
Bulb invented the bulb, got rich, bankrupted Gas, and forgot
his old friends.
Candle and Gas, bitter and impoverished at the ages respec-
tively of 75 and 71, went to sea as respectively the world's
oldest and second oldest cabin boy. Bullb,rich and grand, also
went to sea, but he went in style-as a first-class passenger on
luxury liners.
Well sir, strange to tell, all three were aboard the ill-fated
Lusitania when she was sunk in the North Atlantic. And
strange to tell, when they were swimming for their lives after
the shipwreck, all three clambered aboard the same dinghy l
Well sir, chastened and made wiser by their brush with peril,
they fell into each other's arms and wept and exchanged for-
giveness and became fast friends all over again.
For three years they drifted in the dinghy, shaking hands
and singing the Cal Tech rouser all the while. Then, at long
last, they spied a passing liner and were taken aboard.
They remained fast friends for the rest of their days, which,
I regret to report, were not many, because the liner which picked
them up was the Titanic.
What a pity that Marlboros were not invented during the
lifetimes of Bulb, Gas, and Candle. Had there been Marlboros,
these three friends never would have grown apart because they

11

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