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October 01, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-10-01

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1,1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA 1.' K' a ,.tAaa a..

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Cabinet Officials Say
President Considering

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Russian
LIQUIDITY:
Nations Discu
Of Internation
WASHINGTON (M)-Finance minis
cussions yesterday on the possibility of1
national financial machinery.
The studies, to be conducted both'
Fund and a group of 10 industrialized n
lem of international liquidity-the tec
and
" ~coul
Willis Plans co
Uni
try'
e nat
TravelBifll m
a m
den
By The Associated Press Uni
WASHINGTON-Rep. Edwin E.she
Willis (D-La), chairman of the
House Committee on Un-American
Activities, plans to introduce a bill pos
mi
to give Congress specific powers to i
curb travel abroad by United an
mov
States citizens.b
This issue has come into promi- ber
nence because of student violations crew
of government travel bans to Cuba K
this summer. old
It is understood that Willis is upi
thinking of a measure that would $35
give the secretary of state author- T
ity to prevent anyone from going his
to any country if it is determined He
that his travel there would be the
against the national interest. vest

Wheat Export
ss Pr le-Meeting Set
This Week
ial Finance
ialFi aeeOn Problem
ters of 100 nations opened dis-
putting new gears in the inter- Fulbright, Ellender I
by the International Monetary Support President
ations, will deal with the prob-
hnical term for currency, gold WASHINGTON (P) -- Cabinet
* credit used in settling ac- officials told inquiring senators
nts between countries. yesterday President John F. Ken-
'he current problem, from the nedy is weighing the political as
ted States view, in this coun- well as the economic effects before
s persistent deficit is its inter- deciding whether to 'permit the
tonal balance of payments. In sale of wheat to Russia at subsi-
essage to the conference, Presi-
t John F. Kennedy said the dized export prices.
ted States is determined to Official government sources re-
e this problem "but not at port the Russians have been talk-
expense of others." ing about a deal for three million
We recognize that the reserve tons at $250 million. This infor-
tion of other countries is a mation was made available in ad-
ror image of our own," he said, vance of a night meeting at which
d that as the United States Secretary of State Dean Rusk, So-
es toward equilibrium, it will viet Foreign Minister Andrei A.
more difficult for others to in- Gromyko and British Foreign Sec-
se their reserves." retary Lord Home were invited
:ennedy renewed the 30-year- guests.
United States pledge to back Sen. J, William Fulbright (D-
the dollar at the fixed rate of Ark), chairman of the Senate For-
per ounce of gold. eign Relations Committee, and
he President got in a plug for Sen. Allen J. Ellender (D-La),
domestic tax reduction plan. head of the Senate Agriculture
asserted that reducing taxes is Committee, both threw their sup-
best way to improve the in- port behind presidential action.
tment outlook. They said that Kennedy has the
authority, in their opinion, to clear
the way for a quick deal.
Meeting This Week
CUSSION GROUP Ellender said it was his under-
standing there will be a top-scale
administration meeting this week,
probably today, to review all the
"political" and "economic factors,"
with a view to a decision this week,
at 7 30 orearly next week.
Fulbright said that if the ad-
)OM--UGLI ministration has to wait for ex-
tended debate in Congress- on a
I D SUMN ER, resolution voicing congressional
GL ISH sentiment in favor of such a trans-
action, "there wouldn't be any
deal."
The senators reported that See-
Freeman and Secretary of Com-
retary of Agriculture Orville L.
merce Luther H. Hodges favor an
order from Kennedy authorizing
the sale and that Undersecretary
of State George W. Ball, while
pointing to the "political" prob-
lems involved, appeared to favor
it also.
Bulgaria Interested
At the United Nations, Bulgarian
Foreign Minister Ivan Bashev re-
ported he told United States Sec-
retary of State Dean Rusk Bul-
garia is interested in purchasing
grain from the United States if the
terms are favorable.
Bashev added that he found
Rusk's reaction encouraging, but
that the discussion was only in
general terms and any talk of a
specific deal would be premature.

Russell Leads
Move Against
Rights Unit
By The Associated Press
The nation's racial crisis con-
tinued to smolder yesterday with
events occurring in scattered parts
of the nation.
In Washington, a flood of bit-
ter denunciation of the Civil
Rights Commission by Southern
members opened Senate debate on
a move to give the agency a new
one-year lease on life.
The Southerners were led by
Sen. Richard B. Russell (D-Ga),
who said "let it die. This agency
has shown a prejudice that dis-
qualifies it."
The commission itself, in its
last legal day of existence, provid-
ed the Southerners with new am-
Imunition by making public a
j whole group of new civil rights
recommendations for Congress
and the President, including some
tough penalties.
Among them, the commission
urged that states which refuse to
grant Negro voting rights be pen-
alized by slashing their member-
ship in the House of Representa-
tives.
. The Senate is debating strategy
of keeping the commission in busi-
ness by tieing the proposal for a
one-year extension onto a com-
pletely unrelated bill-thus keep-
ing it from getting lost in commit-
tee.
The Senate had planned a vote
last night but decided to put it off
until today. Approval of the meas-
ure would send it to the House,
where leaders privately said they
see little hope of overcoming par-
liamentary hurdles to get action
there before next week.
The commission told President
John F. Kennedy that for the
first time there is genuine hope
that the nation can solve its racial
problems.
However, the commission warn-
ed against complacency in this
area. "There is still danger that
the growing battle to end discrimi-
See COMMISSION, Page 8

Say U.S.
Restricts
Newsmen
WASHINGTON (R)-A congres-
sional subcommittee accused the
State Department yesterday of
restricting American newsmen in
Viet Nam and hiding the facts
there from the American people.
The accusation came in a report
on a controversial and still classi-
fied cable sent from the State De-
partment to the United States em-
bassy in Saigon in early 1962.
The report was filed by the
House subcommittee on informa-
tion.
The subcommittee said the cable
was intended to restrict newsmen
in Viet Nam. It was drafted by
Carl T. Rowan, a former news-
man, then assistant secretary of
state and now ambassador to Fin-
land.
In Helsinki, Rowan declined
comment. He told a reporter that
the records were in Washington
and "that's enough."
State Department press officer
Richard I. Phillips declined com-
ment. Other department officials,
however, said the department was
doing all it could to facilitate the
flow of news from Viet Nam.
The cable has been rescinded
but the subcommittee said no new
press policy has been sent in its
place.
Court Halts
GOP Move
By The Associated Press
DETROIT--Another in the long
series of attempts to reduce Rich-
ard Durant's control over the Re-
publican organization in the 14th
Congressional District has been
halted by a surprise order from
the courts.
Earl R. Tinesman, one of the
three members of the committee,
charged this was a "plot to elimi-
nate the growing rank and file
enthusiasm for Barry Goldwater
for president." Both Republican
State Chairman Arthur G. Elliott
Jr. and Republican County Chair-
man Peter B. Spivak denied the
charges as unfounded.

UPDATE CHURCH:

11

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SGC READING AND DIS
KAFK
TON IGHT
MULTIPURPOSE RC
SPEAKER: MR. DAV
DEPT. OF EN(

World News Roundup

. .

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy named a cabinet level
task force yesterday to seek reme-
dies for what he called an ominous
rate of rejection of young Ameri-
cans called up for draft board
examinations.
* **
UNITED NATIONS - Nigerian
Foreign Minister Jaja Wachuku
said yesterday the powerful 32-na-
tion African group plans to apply
the strongest possible pressure
against South Africa and Portu-
gal but will stop short of demands
to expel them from the United
Nations.
UNITED NATIONS - Yugoslav
Ambassador Miso Pavicevic said
yesterday Yugoslavia will pay part
of its arrears on the United Na-
tions Congo operations cost. Fol-
lowing a conference with UN Sec-
retary-General U Thant, Pavicevic
said Yugoslavia will pay its arrears
for the period Nov. 1, 1961 to June
30, 1963. He said the figures in-
volved and the details of the pay..
ment will be settled next month.

NEW YORK-Light trading on
the New York Stock Exchange
yesterday was characterized by
weakness in blue chip stocks. The
Dow Jones average showed 30 in-
dustrials down 5.19, 20 railroads
down .12, 15 utilities down .48, and
65 stocks down 1.27.

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SUPPORT

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The U. of M.

Friends of

SNCC
BUCKET DRIVE
TODAY and TOMORROW
$ for freedom

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1O90 to

Fall
BERMUDAS
690 to 9
TWEEDS, FLANNEL,
CORDUROY, COTTON SUEDE.

Corduroy
CULOTTES
590
Reg. 9.95
JUNIOR SIZES

FLANNELS, TWEEDS, CORDUROY,
PLAI DS.

JUMPERS

1290

I,

W-doot-dofthI

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I

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Coeds are toting books
in fold away travel kits
It's the latest fad for school! Handy zip.
pered case carries your books, clothing
for gym class and make-up; doubles as
an overnight case. When empty, folds
flat. Size: 1734"x 13'x 5'". In plaid
canvas, 4.00 ortaatr t

MICHIGRAS
Central Committee
PETITIONING
Through Friday, Oct. 4

SKIRTS
90 to90
TWEEDS, PLAIDS, CORDUROY
in regular and shortee lengths

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