100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THF, MlirulE: A N n A YT.v

s____________________________________________a ''rE , v Lll % nP LUN Ni ATU1UJAY, SIPTEM B)S

ER 21, 1963

I

'4
1I

nge Reunification Aproach
LORIA BOWLES
"agazine Edit= .Cappel noted the clear distinc- take a more realistic view private-
kigain Eitr io to be made between the atti- ly, and in policy making.
inification of t h e i r tude of the intellectual who stilly The teacher of education said
ion is still an issue in discusses reunification but in that Germans are now more in-
ermany, but the Ger- broad terms and relates it to terested in establishing "personal
ach to the problem has other world political events, and contacts" with relatives a n d
rer the last five years. the attitude of the population in friends behind the Iron Curtain
the indication of Dr. general, which seems to have for- that in a full-scale political re-
ppel, visiting lecturer gotten the problem. unification of the country.
edegogische Hochschule Realization Cappel underscored the shift in
autern, Germany, who German political leaders, Cap- emphasis when he said that "now
erday noon at Guild pel said, do not admit publicly the one sees posters at Christmas time
improbability of reunification, but all over Western Germany say-
ing: did you send your package to
N Athe Soviet-occupied zone'." But
"five years ago, before the Berlin
Wall, the posters demanded 'Open
am s Praises E T s the Door' and after the Wall,
Ilia s u aise L ~lUSthere were pictures of a little girl
in a white dress, candle in hand,
climbing over the Wall.
le-to-Peo 1e rw ram Concern for People

Students Perform at Hootenany

ii
RENT A TV THIS SEMESTER
Reserve Yours Now !
NEW 19" G.E. PORTABLES
only $1000,per month
THE LOWEST PRICE IN TOWN
Satisfaction guaranteed
Free installation

'

N EJAC

Free delivery and service
NO 8-6007

11

"This change in attitude indi-
cates that the average citizen of
Western Germany is more con-
cerned about the people of East
Germany than about the question
of reunification."
The intellectual, though com-
mitted to the ideal of reunifica-
tion, sees that theGermans "can't
do anything about it. Only the
USSR and the United States have
the power to reunite Germany.
We are resigned to this fact.
"Thus we can only hope for re-
unification and although we rec-
ognize that we cannot do any-
thing active, we can help our
brothers in the East through our
personal contacts." The usefulness
of demonstrations and memorial
ceremonies, for example, have re-
cently been debated extensively
by students and are widely re-
placed by these persons-to-person
gestures.
Ludwig Erhard
Cappel expects Ludwig Erhard,
slated to succeed Chancellor Kon-
rad Adenauer, will not take a sig-
nificantly different public ap-
proach to reunification. Cappel
forsees some difficulty for the
chancellor-to-be, whose stock has
gone down in the last two years.
Erhard, the economics minister,
is criticized by West Germans for
"not standing up" to Adenauer
when "der alte Mann' attempted
to rework tle German Republic's
constitution. Adenauer, faced with
the impending prospect of no
longer playing a role in German
political affairs, aimed at a
strengthening of the German pres-
idency, now largely a ceremonial
post. After refashioning the office,
Adenauer planned to succeed pres-
ident Theodor Heuss.
Refusal
Cappel said this was only one
instance of Erhard's refusal to
stand up to Adenauer, but he
hopes the minister "will improve
in his job."
Erhard's Christian Democratic
party, however, has few threats
either from the right or the left.
The CDU has a stable Catholic
vote as well as the support of
many Protestants, together far ex-
ceeding the Socialist (SPD) fol-
lowing. They have only to deal
with Erich Mende's Free Demo-
crats, also in a very good position.
This small liberal party enjoys
enormous influence; the Christian
Democrats for whom an alliance
with the Socialists is undesirable,
do not have a majority without the
Free Democrats.
The Free Democrats experienced
substantial electoral success in
1961, when many Germans ex-
pressed their discontent with Ade-
nauer, but were not willing to
vote Socialist.
The party has thus 'taken ad-
vantage of Adenauer's decrease in
popularity, stemming from his re-
fusal to step down. Does it follow
that the CDU will increase its
vote when Adenauer leaves? Cap-
pel does not think that future
CDU success depends on the per-
sonal popular appeal of Erhard,
but rather on continued develop-
ment of the German economy,
which makes for a prosperous and
happy Germany.
Attn., Lansing
"It's not often that a Univer-
sity building project saves the
Legislature money, but the new
Fluids Engineering Bldg. Unit
II has," Vice-President for
Business and Finance Wilbur
K. Pierpont quipped at the
Regents meeting yesterday.
Because of surprisingly low
bids the new total construction
costs, i n c 1 u d i n g furniture,
equipment, professional services
and site work is $175,000 less
than the legislative authoriza-
tion. The total cost is now $2.4
million.

1
i

-Daily-Todd Pierce
MARKLEY HOOTENANNY-Folk music drifted out of the Mary Markley Snack Bar last night as a
large number of the University students were entertained by student performers. The musical fare
ranged from solo numbers to group singing, from American folk songs to folk songs from all around
the world. Among the numbers presented were "This Land Is Your Land" and "Careless Love."
EMU SELECTION:
Lists Presidency Qualification

(Continued from Page 1)

THE SAFE WAY to stay alert
without harmful stimulants

9

The faculty committee will in-
clude representatives of EMU's
non-academic service personnel in
addition to faculty representatives
because "they have some interest
in the selection of the president,"
Bartlett said.
While students will not directly
participate in the committee's
work, Bartlett added that he

thought it would be open to stu-
dent's suggestions.
The state board is awaiting clar-
ification of its legal status before
appointing a new EMU president,
he continued. Under the new con-
stitution, the current state board
will remain in office until Jan-
uary, 1965, but the same docu-
ment provides for independent
boards for its four universities by
Jan. 1, 1984. .
Legal Conflict
The attorney general is now
considering the conflict. Bartlett
declared that the state board will
abide with his ruling.
If new boards are appointed, the
state board will give the results

of its search for a president to the
new EMU board, he said.
The state board has conferred
with EMU administrators about
increasing communication, as rec-
ommended in the North Central
Association report on the univer-
sity, Bartlett noted.
Role in State
The board is also seeking to find
a better definition of EMU's role
in the state higher education sys-
tem, as recommended by NCA.
Bartlett said that he hoped Gov.
George, Romney's "blue ribbon"
Citizen's Committee for Higher
Education will help EMU find its
proper role through its report on
Michigan's education system.

NoDoz keeps you mentally
alert with the same safe re-
fresher found in coffee and
tea. Yet NoDoz is faster,
handier, more reliable. Abso-
lutely not habit-forming.

Next time monotony makes
you feel drowsy while driving,
working or studying, do as
millions do ..perk up with
safe, effective NoDoz tablets.
Another fine product ofGrove Laboratodeet

9

'

II

I

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

I

I

..

f

College, Roundup

LYNN M. BARTLETT
... EMU standards
Regents Accept
New Computer
For Dearborn
A $1.75 million Univac I Com-
puter System has been presented
to the Dearborn Campus by the
Remington Rand Corp.
The Regents officially accepted
the gift at their September meet-
ing yesterday. The computer will
have a salvage value of $100,000.
Vice-President for the Dearborn
Campus William E. Stirton ex-
plained that the computer will be
used in both teaching and re-
search, particularly in the engi-
neering and business administra-
tion divisions.
"We have a fine complement of
analog computers but this is our
first digital computer of any size.
This equipment will broaden lour
total educational program and will
enable us to further expand our
graduate program. It will supple-
ment the exposure to and utiliza-
tion of this type of equipment
that our co-op students find in
industry.",
Stirton added that "because our
students work with the latest com-
puter equipment in industry, it is
imperative that we offer classroom
experience on these cotputers."
TIe noted that one of the first
instructional uses of the computer
has already occured.

By NEAL FRIEDMAN
SYRACUSE - Two professors
and 25 students from Syracuse
University lrave been arrested this
week for sit-ins protesting segre-
gation here.
The demonstrations, sponsored
by CORE, are protesting the re-
locating of Negroes who are
forced to move by urban renewal
in Negro neighborhoods. This ac-
tion has the support of local chap-
plains, who have taken an adver-
tisement in a local paper stating
that "Negro citizens have a just
and legitimate grievance against
the Syracuse community."
* * .
CINCINNATI -- University
budgets must triple by 1970 if
they are to keep up with increased
demands, according to a survey of
Ohio campuses made by the Cin-
cinnati Post & Times-Star.
Competition \from business and
industry has forced colleges to
grant pay increases and shorter
classroom hours to professors in
mathematics and the sciences, the
report stated. The reduction in
teaching hours has made it neces-
sary for some colleges to hire
twice as many professors to teach
the same number of students.
BERKELEY - All fraternities
and sororities at the University of

California will definitely have to
sign a non-discrimination pledge
by Sept. 1, 1964, according to
Clark, Kerr, president of the Uni-
versity of California.
A few fraternities and most of
the sororities have not yet signed,
Kerr noted. If they do not sign,
"we will declare them as non-rec-
ognized and they will not be ap-
proved housing," he continued.
/ * * *
LEIDEN-The president of the
National Union of Students of
Morocco, Hamid Barrada, was ar-
rested Aug. 28 for protesting re-
pressive government tactics, the
Coordinating Secretariat of the
International Student Conference
reported.
He has not been heard from
since and COSEC has asked for
worldwide student protest of his
arrest.
Barrada was first arrested Aug.
12, but released. He was rearrest-
ed Aug. 28 after a Moroccan-Al-
gerian-Tunisian student confer-
ence. He had called the Moroccan
monarchy "the last remaining ob-
stacle to the unification of the
Maghreb."
The government said Barrada
was arrested for statements "of-
fensive and injurious against the
monarchy and the national insti-
tutions."

Cinhem a ui/d (4ejeht4
Tonight and Tomorrow at 7 and 9
THE ANTI-WAR MASTERPIECE
ALL QUIET' ON
THE WESTERN FRONT
Starring LEW AYRES
Directed by LEWIS MILESTONE
This is the dramatic- study of ao
young German soldier's reactions
to the utter calamity of war.
ARCHITECTURE AUDITOR I UM

FIFTY

CENTS

b.

U-

r1

tutions."
Er

"PHILIPPINE SOJOURN"
Professor Kenneth Pike, Ph.D., Speaker
SUNDAY AT SEVEN
university reformed church
Temporary Quarters: YM-YWCA
East William & 5th Avenue

I I

k
I

I

'

r

DIAL 2-6264
Shows at 1:00, 4:30 & 8:00 p.m.
UFMTHEYEAR
WINNER OF
ACADEW.
IAWARDS I
tI

MICHIGRAS
CENTRAL COMMITTEE
PETITIONING MEETING
for POSITIONS on
Publicity * Amusements * Refreshments* Booths
Parades." And Many Other Committees

:

I

Here's deodorant protection
YOU CAN TRUST
Old Spice Stick Deodorant... fastest, neatest way to all.
day, every day protection! It's the man's deodorant pre.

I

1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan