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September 15, 1963 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-15

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Y, SEPTEMBER 15, 1963 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

COLLEGE EDUCATION:
Conant Proposes Subsidies

See Complexity, Activity
On Nation's Campuses

By G. K. HODENFIELD
Associated Press Education Writer
WASHINGTON - Jales B.
Conant, president emeritus of
Harvard and an influential com-
mentator on United States edu-
cation, proposes in a new book
that America's brightest high
school graduates be given a free
college education if they become
teachers in the public shools.
Conant said each state should
provide a program of all-expense
loans for high school graduates
who plan to become teachers and
who are in the top 30 per cent of
their graduating class.
The loans, Conant said, should
be cancelled after four or five
years of teaching in the public
schools of that state. He did not
specify terms of repayment for
those who went into another field
or left the state.
American Teachers
This was one of the 27 proposals
on the recruitment, preparation
and certification of teachers out-
lined by Conant in his latest book,
"T h e Education of American
Teachers."
The book follows a two-year
study that took Conant and his
staff to 77 campuses in 22 states.
Unlike his earlier reports on ed-
ucation, which were directed to
local school boards and parents,
this one is addressed to the 1,150
colleges and universities whic,
presently prepare teachers.
Education Fight
The average reader consequent-
ly may find it tough slogging
through the long and detailed dis-
cussions of state requirements for
teacher certification, and the nev-
er-ending war between academic

professors and the professors of1
education.
But Conant comes through loud
and clear in the concluding chap-'
ter which sums up his proposals,,
some of which seem certain to stir
debate among those bharged with
training the nation's f u t u r e
teachers.
Three Steps
He suggests, for example, that
the present complex and unwieldy
steps toward teacher certification
should be reduced to just three
requirements:
1) A baccalaureate degree from
"a legitimate college or university."
2) Evidence of participation in
a state-approved practice teaching
program.
3) A certificate from the college
or university attesting that the in-
stitution considers the recipient
adequately prepared to teach in a
designated field or grade level.
New Programs
This would permit the institu-
tions todevise their own programs
on teacher education, free from
state requirements of a specified
number of courses in such subjects
as methods of teaching, child psy-
chology, child growth and develop-
ment, history of education..
Conant does not' recommend
that these courses be abolished,
only thatseach institution be free
to chart its own path.
"The Education of American'
Teachers" may also be criticized
because Conant does not deal with
some of the major problems of
teacher education today. These
would include the special prepara-
tion needed by teachers in big city
slum, guidance counselors, curric-
ulum specialists, teachers of the
mentally retarded and physically

handicapped, and teachers in vo-
cational education.
Other Conant proposals include:
A large jump in salary when a
teacher moves out of probationary
status.
Salary increases based on for-
mal work toward an advanced de-
gree, not on casual courses taken
in summer school, or in off-duty
hours.
Leaves of absence with salary
for a full-time semester residence
at a university to enable teachers
to study toward a master's degree.
Small colleges if they cannot
afford to hire three or four pro-
fessors devoting their time to ele-'
mentary education, they should
cease attempting to prepare teach-
ers for the elementary schools.
During the probationary period,
local school boards should take
specific steps to provide new
teachers with every possible help,
including limited teaching respon-
sibility, "shifting to more exper-
ienced teachers those pupils who
create problems beyond the ability
of the novice to handle effective-
ly," and specialized instruction
concerning the community, the
neighborhood, and the students he
is likely to encounter..
Practice Teaching
Conant places heavy stress on
the practice teaching program for
future teachers. He proposes that
only the best teachers be appoint-
ed to supervise the teacher can-
didate, and that "clinical pro-
fessors" from the colleges and
universities be appointed to over-
see the program.
He also urges that state author-
ities develop regulations to insure
that a teacher will be assigned
only thoseiduties for which he is
specifically prepared, and that
when a teacher has been certified
by one state, his certificate should
be accepted as valid in any other
state.
Conant also urges that prepara-
tion for a teaching career begin
in high school. His proposed high
school program for a prospective
teacher includes four years of
English, four years of one foreign
language, at least three but pref-
er'ably four years of mathematics,
three years of natural science,
three years of history and social
studies, and two years of art and
music.

By The Associated Press
. WASHINGTON-The almost 4.5£
million students return to college
this month will find sparkling new
buildings, baffling new technology,
and programs of instruction which
last year were only a gleam in
some dreamer's eye.f
From the smallest private col-e
leges to the sprawling state uni-
versities, higher education in the
United States is going in for great
change.
Under the enrollment crush, the
public institutions are changing,
more rapidly than the private. t
ALGCSU Survey
A survey by the Association of
Land Grant Colleges and State
Universities shows that building ist
booming everywhere.-
More than half the public in-t
stitutions surveyed are opening
new dormitories this fall to house
more than 20,000 students. Nearlyt
every campus will have at leastt
one new building. About half of
the new buildings are for, newt
science facilities.
The University of Wisconsin,
with 35,000 students, is 'spending;
$42 million to ;construct 18 build-
ings on three campuses. Wayne1
State University is building a com-_
pletely new medical campus. The
University of Colorado is adding a;
$16.8 million hospital and re-7
search wing.
Help Handicapped
More attention is being paid to
the preparation of teachers for.
the physically and mentally handi-
capped.
The University of Iowa will offer
j new undergraduate degree pro-
gram for students specializing in
teaching the mentally -retarded,
and the physically handicapped.
A new hospital, now under con-
struction, will provide students
laboratory experience.
The University of Wisconsin will
initiate a five-year program, lead-
ing to a master's degree, for teach-
ers of handicapped children. The
University of Washington will be-
gin work on its center for research
and training in retardation.
Small Town Teachers
The University of Arizona will
have a program for teachers from
small towns throughout the state.
They will be brought to the cam-
pus for a full year of training in
such specialized fields as remedial.

reading and teaching the retarded
and handicapped.
At Pennsylvania State Univer-
sity this fall, 29 hand-picked stu-
dents will begin a revolutionary
program to complete the require-
ments for a medical degree in-
five years instead of the traditional
eight. The students will attendt
school around the calendar.
The University revised its calen-
dar for future year-round # opera-
tions this fall, while three units
of the state university of New
York and Texas A. & M. prepare
to begin the three-semester system.
Electronic Aid
A growing number of institutions
are turning to electronic compu-
ters to help register students,
schedule their classes and keep
their records.
The University of Maine and
Texas Technological College are
opening their own educational
television stations. At the Univer-
sity of Idaho, 1500 students will
be taught mathematics by televi-
sion.
The University of North Caro-
lina has added 30 new courses,
ranging from a history of Russia
between 862 and 1861, to a seminar
,in comparative animal behavior.
The trend continues toward high
admission standards and quaiity
programs for the better students.
The University of Texas now
requires two years of a foreign
language for entering freshmen.
Arizona State University has raised
the academic requirements for
upper division students n two of
its colleges.
At the University of Washington
new requirements double the
amount of work formerly required
of a student outside his major
field. UCLA has doubled its special
programs for outstanding high
school students.
In the arts, the University of
Kansas has commissioned an opera
by Douglas Moore, the American
composer. Wayne State University
plans to establish a Shakespeare
repertory group, and is construct-
ing a new theater.
The University of California will
observe the 400th anniversary of
Shakespeare's birth with a full
year of plays and seminars, and
South Dakota State College this
year will inaugurate an annual
fine arts festival.

ti-

IN FORMATION ON
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
The Graduate School announces an open
meeting for undergraduate and graduate
students interested in graduate fellowships
for 1964-65.
Campus faculty representatives will explain
the major fellowship programs including:
University of Michigan Fellowships,
National Defense Education Act,
Rhodes, Marshall, Danforth,
National Science Foundation,
Woodrow Wilson, Fulbright-Hays,
and others
TUESDAY, SEPT. 17
3:30 P.M.
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE

CONTROVERSIAL BILL:
Action Pends on Housing Ordinance

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(Continued from Page 1)
real property and the rental of all
real property except one and two
family dwellings in which the own-
er maintains residence.
Or the council could schedule an
advisory of the public before final,
action is taken. However, few of
the councilmen or civil rights sup-
porters are in favor of a city-wide
advisory vote.
Finally, action on the ordinance
might be postponed for a later
meeting. However, in an informal
meeting yesterday morning it was
decided that final action of some
nature would be taken at the next
formal council meeting.
Sit-Ins, Pickets
For the past % fifteen weeks,
FICA-CORE has held demonstra-
tions consisting of sit-ins and pick-
ets for the purpose of getting a
stronger fair housing ordinance
passed.
In certain pickets, their numbers
have reached as high as 300 peo-
ple. Spokesmen for the FHA-CORE
group say the demonstrations will
continue whether or not the Hul-
cher ordinance is passed, and the
ranks of the demonstrators have
been steadily increasing.
The intention of the civil Tights
leaders is to protest until an or-
dinance very similar to the clergy-
men's ordinance is passed.
Punitive Measures
The "clergymen's ordinance"
calls for the immediate invoking
of punitive measures when a viola-
tion of fair housing provisions is
proven. It is also against the stiff
penalties imposed for falsely re-
porting a violation of the fair
housing laws.
The "clergymen's ordinance"
would also increase the powers of
the Human Relations Commission
in acting, on violations of fair
housing regulations.
Whatever happens, fair housing
is an advanced form of civil rights
legislation, as evidenced by the lack
of fair housing laws in other
American cities.

1 Family houses
2 Family houses
3-4 Apartments
5-9 Apartments
10 Or more apts.
Local area(3)
Campus area
Ann Arbor total

rent and
vacant (2)
1907 20%
1699 18%
1923 20%
2760 29%
1211 13%
4839 51%
4661 49%
950 100%

9

owner
occupied

9
1

DIRECT COVERAGE EFFECT OF THE
FAIR HOUSING PROPOSALS (4)

Huicher Committee
Proposal
a 0 a

0

DISTRIBUTION OF DWELLING UNITS IN ANN ARBOR (1)

total
units

Clergymen's
Proposal
r
a 00a

229 92% 11136
557 6% 2256
132 1% 2155
109 1% 2869
10 0% 1211
081 90% 13920
056 10% 5717
137 100% 19637

57%
11%
11%
15%
6%
71%
29%
100%

1 Family houses
2 Family houses
3-4 Apartments
5-9 Apartments
10 Or more apts.
Local area
Campus area
Ann Arbor total

15% (5)

26%
60%
100%
100%
48%
76%
62%

f

5% 7%
2.5% 20%
2.5% 54%
100% 100%
100% 100%
5% 20%'
11% 64%
6% 33%

100%
67%
100%
100%
100%
91%
97%

100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%

100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%

94% 100% 100%

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(EDITOR'S NOTE: These statis-
tics were compiled by Brereton W.
Bissell, '63.)
1) University facilities, including
married student apartments, frater-
nities, sororities, most rooming units'
and other living arrangements de-
fined by tne public census as "group
quarters" have been excluded from
this data.
2) Units classified as "vacant" by
the census have been combined with
"rented" units in this data. "Owner
occupied" includes only units that
were owner occupied but hot other
units that are located in the owner
occupied structure
3) The "campus area" is bound
by the Ann Arbor Rail Road, Ann
St., Division St., Huron River, Mich-
ols Dr.,. Oswego St., Cambridge Rd.,
Forest Ave. and Dewey St.
4) The Hulcher Committee Pro-
posal covers the sale and the rental
of units of the owner of five or
more dwelling units whether locat-
ed in scattered, contiguous or sin-
gle structures. The Clergyman's Pro-
posal covers the sale and rental of
all dwelling units except rental
units in two family houses which are
owner occupied. Other provisions and
exemptions, including rooming units,

5) These percentages indicate the
proportion of the dwelling units in
each category that would be cover-
ed by the proposal. The "rented and
vacant"/ column indicates the cov-
erage of the rental provisions. The
"owner occupied" column indicates
the coverage of the sale provisions
for owner occupied units only. The
"total units" column indicates the
combined coverage of the sale and
rental provisions.
The estimate of the maximum ef-
fect of the Hulcher Committee Pro-
posal was determined from the 1960
Census data, information from sev-
eral city departments and the Ann
Arbor Federal Savings and Loan As-
sociation. The basic estimating per-
centages for rental units were: units
rented and vacant in structures
owned unoccupied, one family-15
per cent, two family-35.8 per cent,
three apartments-62.5 per cent and
four apartments-95 per cent, and
units rented and vacant in struc-
tures owner occupied, one family-
none, two family-five per cent,
three apartments-7.5 per cent and
four apartments-10 per cent.
Since this data is based on the
1960 Census, the picture has not
changed greatly due to new build-
ing and city annexation.

of these proposals;
ered in this data.

are not consid-

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