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September 13, 1963 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-13

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' .'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, S E ER 18,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 15. 19e~

R ..r iI./ .Y.RAkiY1 +YVU

a

en tagon
FRED S. HOFFMAN

Whiz-Kids

Upset

Military

Ejection of Students
Sparks Riot at HUAC
(Continued from Page 1)

Associated Press Military Affairs Writer'
WASHINGTON lP)-Many mili-
tary professionals smart under
what they consider an excessive
influence of civilian "whiz-kid"o
officials at the Pentagon.
But these civilians, too, have met1
frustrations.
"The fact is, this is a one-man
show," said one informed author-
ity who rates himself neutral in
the rilitary-vs.-civilian feuding.
"It's run by Secretary of De-
1ense Robert S. McNamara - he
makes up his own mind and makes
the decisions."
New Idea
Like some military leaders,the
civilian operations analysts, theo-
reticians and experts are known to
have chafed because McNamara
would not go along with certain of
their ideas.
But while rebuffs suffered by
the services often come into the
open, the thwarting of some of the
pet proposals of the "whiz kids"a
generally is known only to the in-,
ner circle of defense leaders.
It is reliably reported, for exam-
ple, that some of the civilian
thinkers some time ago advanced
the idea of withdrawing all nu-
clear battlefield weapons from
Western Europe to reduce the haz-
ard of accidental atomic exchange.
No NATO
According to the knowledgeable'
sources, the Joint Chiefs of Staff
warned that such a move could
mean the end of the North Atlan-
tic Treaty Organization. The pro-
posal got no further.
The long festering military re-

sentments became a matter of
public record last week.
Adm. George W. Anderson, re-
tired chief of naval operations and
new ambassador to Portugal, told
a National Press Club audience he
was alarmed at what he said is a
trend to overcentralization of civ-
ilian authority at the Pentagon.
Blast Specialists
While obliquely critical of Mc-
Namara, Anderson also made it
plain he objects to the role played
by civilian specialists brought into
the Defense Department by Mc-
Namara from various research and
analysis organizations.
Many of these men, mostly un-
known to the general public, carry
doctorates and other academic
laurels. A number of them are rel-
atively young-hence the term
"whiz kids" is applied to them by
critics and admirers alike.
Speaking of this group, Ander-
son said: "I am disturbed because
now in the Department of Defense
the operations analysts, properly
concerned with 'cost effectiveness,'
seems to be working at the wrong
echelon-above the professional
military level rather than in an
advisory capacity."
To Heart
This goes to the heart of the ob-
jections of the uniformed officer
corps.
Many officers feel strongly there
is a place for the civilian "brain"
who analyzes the defense problems
scientifically and mathematically
--but they believe such analysts
should be servants, rather than
masters, of the seasoned military
professionals.

Their gripe is that the analysts
who have achieved stature under
McNamara dabble in military
strategy and weapons questions
which, the military professionals
contend, they lack the experience
and competence to handle.
Some Improvements
Military men give the civilian
specialists credit for some needed
improvements in management
methods-such as adoption of a
"program package" plan for pro-
jecting defense money, weapons,
manpower and other needs over a
five-year period rather than de-
termining these needs on a some-
what disjointed year-to-year basis
as in the past.
The services are not against
the idea of analysis-the Air Force,
Navy and Army all have such ex-
pert groups staffed largely with
civilians within their structures.
There is no doubt that McNa-
mara-a "facts and figures man"
gave the analysts greater prom-
inence than they ever had enjoyed
before in the defense setup.
No Slight
But associates of the secretary
insist he does not buy what the
analysts sell without weighing
their arguments against those of
the military, and that the military
positions do not get short shrift.
The art of operations analysts

has become more sophisticated
with the advent of improved com-
puters and other advanced tools.
One major criticism voiced by mil-
itary men is that all problems can-
not be reduced to mathematical
equations and computer treatment.
These uniformed sources - and
there are some key civilians who
share their views--contend the
operations analysts are so bemused
by what they think is rational and
logical that they do not give due
consideration to the possibility of
illogical action by the Russians.
These critics point to the Rus-
sian gambit last year aimed at
placing missiles in Cuba right un-
der the nose of the United States
as an action that was militarily il-
logical but which was attempted
nonetheless.
No Rules
What bothers him, this high of-
ficer said, is that such thinking
gives little allowance to the possi-
bility that the Russians might not
play the game according to the
way the analysts figure it.
Another criticism leveled at the
civilian analysts is that they take
slight account of human factors.
As one admiral put it: "These
people don't quite understand that
a problem faced by a skipper on
the bridge of a warship at sea off

an enemy coast is not susceptible:
to a solution by computer."
A recurrent theme in conversa-
tion with seasoned milit'ary pro-
fessionals is that some of the civil-
ians who get involved in strategy
are too young to have seen any
wartime service, and thus have no
realistic conception of waging war.
No Experience
The civilian specialists counter
this by saying the military profes-
sionals are no more experienced
than they in the nuclear war. They
note there has not yet been a war
in which atomic weapons were
used in any scale beyond the drop-
ping of two early model bombs on
Hiroshima and Nagasaki toward
the end of World War II.
Who are the "whiz kids?" Here
are thumbnail sketches of a few
of the most influential:

--Alain C. Enthoven, Rhodes
scholar; holder of an MIT eco-
nomics doctorate; product of Rand
Corp., a "think factory" where he
worked on strategic warfare stu-
ies; prime mover in fostering
"spare the cities" policy which en-
visions nuclear exchanges aimed
at military complexes and bases
rather than populations.
-Henry S. Rowen, MIT gradu-
ate, did graduate work at Oxford
and another product of Rand. Has
had great impact in formulating
limited and conventional war poli-
cies.
-Harold Brown, director of the
famed Lawrence Radiation Lab-
oratory before becoming powerful
director of defense research and
engineering. Views weigh heavily
in approval or disapproval of
weapons projects.

"Even when some members said
they would leave peacefully they
were dealt with in the same bru-
tal manner. Everyone's clothes
were ripped and some people were
injured."
The police then hustled the
youths into a nearby press room
and held them there for about
twenty minutes but no one was
arrested.
When order was restored after
nearly 10 minutes, the subcommit-
tee went on with its questioning
of Laub. The 25-year-old New
Yorker repeatedly invoked the
Fifth Amendment in refusing to
answer questions abouti arrange-
ments for the trip to Cuba.

He told the congressmen the
Cuban Communist revolution has
been marked by "brilliant success-
es. .
When committee counsel Alfred
Nittle asked Laub about his ar-
rest in New York two years ago
for refusing to take cover during a
civil defense test, Laub replied that
was in the American tradition of
civil disobedience.
Staring at the committee bench,
he added many other Americans
are using that tactic to fight "the
same kind of racists that are sit-
ting up here in front of me right
now."
Again Laub's young supporters
let loose a storm of applause.

;;',y

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