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September 11, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

DNE DAY, SEPTA ER Y1.19.63

TINE MICHIGAN DAI.Y WEDNSDA. SETE_ 1114

-A1AA)LAV AA, AJVJ

a

OMPATIBLE PARADOXES':
lalmos Analyzes. Counseling

Those who act as counselors,
including psychoanalysts, psycho-
therapists and social case workers,
tend to act on "some kind of
faith in man unexplainable by
scientific evidence" despite their
avowal of the value of tough-
mindedness and empiricism, he
said.
Prof. Halmos asserted that this
paradoxical attitude, "bilingual-
ism," reflects a 20th century ideol-
ogy which is positivistic on one
hand and idealistic on the other.
Second Paradox
A second paradox is the pride
which counselors take in claiming
that they are non-directive and
non-judgmental in their work.
However, the source of the pa-
tient's guidance cannot help but
be the counselor's own value judg-
ments, he said.
Since in modern psychotherapy
emphasis is placed on ego-rein-
forcing, "actually the sheer to-
getherness of the counselor and
patient is important."
Another paradox is that "the
issue of directiveness has become
a moral issue haying to do with
the integrity of the counselor." The
analyst must decide whether to
become involved in the patient's
treatment. One view is that the
counselor should not realize per-
sonal goals ad therefore should not
use his personality as part of the
treatment, Prof. Halmos noted.
Counter-Transference
At the same time there is the
suggestion that "counter-transef-
ence" is necessary and the analyst
is urged to become personally in-
volved in the solution of the pa-
tient's problems. One way in which
the counselor might become in-
volved would be to "administer
love or mothering" to a person
undergoing treatment, he said.
A fourth paradoxical aspect of

Unveil Facts
For Study
Of Activities
(Continued from Page 1)
discuss what they intend to do.
When their report is submitted
(probably in time for the October
Regents' meeting), it will be tabled
"and not acted upon until it has
been given the widest publicity,"
Mrs. Murphy remarked. This is to
give students an adequate chance
to commnet on the study.
Denies Statement
She also denied having made a
statement to the effect that the
Regents would urn down a Union-
League merger proposal if it had
two co-equal boards. for finances
and student activities.
Another issue of some student
concern lately has been the non-
existence of a regental bylaw for
the vice-presidency for student af-
fairs.
Mrs. Murphy noted that the del-
egation of authority has been.
through action by President
Hatcher-"which has the force of
aBbylaw."
Outmoded Bylaw
The President said last night
that regental action in 1954, when
the vice-presidency was establish-
ed, supersedes the outmoded OSA
bylaw now on the books. "I don't
think there is a need for a new
bylaw."
This issue arose two years ago
when the OSA was revamped, with
the deans of men and women abol-
ished. Student Government Coun-
cil and several other campus
groups then requested that a new
mandate be composed.
Lewis worked last year on such
a draft, but Mrs. Murphy said the
Regents did not receive any bylaw
proposals during the summer.

'GRAVE RESERVATIONS:
Research Study Examines
Pittsburgh Trimester Plan

#lel
£uppe Club
THIS WEEK'S SPECIAL:
CORNED BEEF ON RYE

PAUL HALMOS
... .contradictory principles
the counselor's faith is his readi-
ness to dedicate himself to his
work without evidence that he
achieves what he sets out to do.
Counseling is not a restitution, but
is rather a process which is usually
broken off in the middle. It is
impossible to "prove" a cure, Dr.
Halmos asserted.
Despite the lack of evidence that
his treatment is of any help, the
counselor feels a "compulsive ne-
cessity to help." He must work not
to leave anything undone, he con-
cluded.
Chess Club Holds
Opening Meeting
The year's first meeting of the
University Chess Club will occur
at 6:30 p.m. today on the third
floor, Michigan Union.

A research study at the Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh has indicated
that both students and faculty
members have adjusted easily to
the trimester system in effect
there.
The study; conducted over the
period of three years since the
trimester plan has been in opera-
tion, reports that students and
faculty still feel "certain grave
reservations" about year-round
education.
Responding to questionnaires,
the student body reported that
library and study facilities were
perfectly adequate in the summer
session and even "advantageous"
for those who wanted to complete
degree requirements earlier.
Unable To Go
Many students noted, however,
that they did not want or were
unable to attend the summer ses-
sions. Most frequently received
reasons cited a lack of fundscdis-
like of year-round education, need
for a vacation and the alleged in-
feriority of summer instruction.
Faculty members, although gen-
erally responsive to the possibili-
ties of trimester education, had
more severe objections.
They suggested, the report states,
that expanded financial aid plans
be made to encourage greater sum-
mer attendance.
Inequitable Salaries
They also felt that faculty sum-
mer salaries, still not equal to the
winter payments, should be in-
creased to "stimulate better edu-
cation" during the summer ses-
sions.
The report goes on to reveal that
faculty members took a more lax
view towards summer day-by-day
class attendance than they had
during the winted semesters.
Only 63 per cent as many fac-

ulty members checked attendance
daily as they had during the other
semesters, the report states.
As for possible changes within
the trimestet framework, the re-
port finds that students and fac-
ulty responded with a wide range
of suggestions.
Students asked for further
sources of financial aid, a better-
ment of summer instruction and
an increase in academic pressure
during the summer trimester.
Faculty members desired greater
financial and professional rewards
for relinquishing summer vaca-
tions and many called for the
making of summer attendance
compulsory.
'U' Receives
Science Aid
The University received three
National S c i e n c e Foundation
grants totaling $182,700 recently
for mathematics department re-
search projects.
Prof. Nicholas D. Kazarinoff
will supervise the largest project
which has been awarded $94,000.
He and Prof. Charles Dolph will
be working on boundary value
problems for partial differential
equations. Problems to be studied
arise from changing fields inside
an object when waves are diffract-
ed at the object's boundary.
Working with Prof. Kazarinoff
under the grant will be Profs.
Donald Darling and James Wen-
del on theory of probability, Prof.
Joseph Ullman on approximation
theory, Prof. George Minty on
functional analysis and Prof.
George Piranian on theory of
functions of a complex variable.
Prof. Kazarinoff's grant has
provisions for research assistant-
ships for eight graduate students.
Prof. Edward Halpern will di-
rect research into topology of
manifolds under a $58,300 grant.
His colleagues will be Profs. Mor-
ton Brown, Noel Hicks and Ronald
O'Neill.
Topology involves the study of
mathematical properties which are
invariant under deformations of
space. The grant has provisions for
seven research assistantships.
Prof. Lawrence Eggan will di-
rect the $30,400 third grant, a
two-year study of Diophantine
approximation and group theory.

Hillel members
Non-members

I

1429 H ill St.

ORCHESTRA AUDITIONS
GO-TO urges his fellow
/musicians to attend
Sunday, Sept. 15 Monday, Sept. 16,
MICHIGAN UNION-Room 3D
come prepared with instruments
S}O C)>g o< >o<" :'. C}

75c
$1.00

4

DIAL OAt262

a

T.E- 1
.. . III ..... Y

" ENDING TODAY.
BOB CUMMINGS
FRANKIE AVALON
"BEACH PARTY"

I

. STARTING THURSDAY n

DEGREE-GRANTING INSTITUTION:
Citizen's Group Studies College Possibility'

By WILLIAM BENOIT
A citizen's committee has pre-
pared a detailed report examining
the possibility of locating a two-
year, degree-granting community
college in Washtenaw County.
The committee found clear in-
terest in the proposel college from
a large number of Washtenaw
County residents. Forty-seven per
cent from a group of parents of
fifth-grade children said they
would probably send their children
to a community college if it offer-
ed a wide variety of academic and
occupational programs.
The committee voted to present
its 192-page report to the Wash-
tenaw County School Officers As-
sociation, which sponsored the sur-
vey.
Association To Meet
The association will meet in
about two weeks to determine how
the report will affect future action
of the group on the school prob-
lem, John P. Montoyne, president
of the county association, said.
If a drive to initiate action on
the proposed community college
occurs, it will originate in the as-
sociation, Montoyne noted.
The association took over spon-
sorship of the study after a Cham-
ber of Commerce survey of 20 large
business firms, completed in No-
vember, 1960, indicated interest in
the establishment of a community
college.
Prof. Young Directs
Director of the earlier Chan-
ber of Commerce study was Prof.
Raymond J. Young of the educa-
tion school, who worked with the
citizen's committee.
If constructed, the college would
seek accreditation from the state
of Michigan immediately, Prof.
Harold M. Dorr of the political
science department noted.
Prof. Dorr, a member of the
committee, said the cost of a
Washtenaw County community
college built to accommodate 2600-
2800 students would be "in the
area of $6 million."
One Mill Levy
The committee's report stated
that the community college could
be established, operated and main-
tained within a one-mill levy. Au-
thorization of one and a quarter
mills-would be adequate to provide
for growth which might reasonably
occur during the next 20 years.
The expanding economy of
Washtenaw County and its favor-
able effects on the assessed evalua-

tion of the rcounty would indicate
that the citizens of the area could
easily support such an institution,
the report noted.
The citizen's committee study
also points out that many high
school graduates are deprived of
higher education because of' the
financial barrier of attending
school away from home.
Question of Money
Surveys of Washtenaw Coun-
ty's graduating seniors from June,
1963 show that 15 per cent of all
seniors not planning on college
indicated that their plans would
change if more money were avail-
able.
Of the youths not planning col-
lege, only five per cent said they
would be interested in post-gradu-
ate word at the local high school,

Nurses training, pre-profession-+
al and liberal arts education, elec-
tric and electronics technology,
laboratory technology, drafting
and design, mechanical technology
and commercial art were the fields;
in which there was sufficient in-
terest to merit programs, the study
indicated.
County Graduates Unskilled +
Washtenaw County employers1
feel that graduates of county high
schools are not ready for work at
jobs above the unskilled and semi-
skilled, the study maintained.
Employers report the greatest
lack of qualified personnel in elec-
tronics and electricity, with sig-
nificant demands in drafting, tool
and die technology and health
specialties. There will also be open-
ings for well-trained office per-
sonnel with specialties, the study
said. V
One section of the report deal-
ing with the composition of the la-
bor force in the county noted that
there is an unusually high per-
centage of persons in professional,
semi-professional, technical and
managerial types of occupations,
and that semi-professional jobs
are concentrated in health, sci-
ence and engineering research re-
search and government service.
Growth Expected
A thirty-two per cent growth is
expected by 1967 in a number of
technical and semi-professional
jobs, while a decline in employ-
ment of the unskilled is antici-
pated.
This serves to emphasize the
need for an institution in this area
that is capable of providing ad-
vanced training because job open-
ings in future years will be mostly
in the fields of skilled, technical
labor, the report continued.
The legal committee, a subsidi-
ary of the citizen's committee, rec-

ommended in the report that a;
community college district be cre-
ated within the county boundaries,
with the exception of a small por-
tion of the northeast corner which
is in the northwest Wayne County
community college district.
Difficult To Obtain Funds
Committee member Joseph C.
Cahill pointed out that the ob-,
taining of funds for construction
of the community college may
prove to be difficult, as many mill-
age issues have been defeated in
the area recently. He also cited
s c h o o l indebtedness "w h i c h
amounted to more than $33 million
in 1962."

A SIDNEY PINK Production. PANACOLOR " Presented By WARNER BROS. W

SEPTEMBER 19th
"LAWRENCE OF ARABIA"

I

Series

Opens

With Bernstein'
Leonard Bernstein and the New
York Philharmonic Orchestra will
open this; year's Choral Union Se-
ries withH aconcert at 8:30 p.m.
today at Hill Aud.
Featured will be "Academic Fes-
tival Overture" and "Symphony
No. 4 in E Minor" by Brahms and
William Schumann's "Symphony
No. 3."

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SGC
COMMITTEE ON UN IVERSITY 'AFFAI RS
4 ~(FACULTY SUBCOMMITTEES)Y
F F ORGAN IZATIONAL MEETI NG
MON DAY, SEPT. 23
SGC Chambers
}t:. 7:30 P.M. 3rd floor, SABk
.".... . . .......:3".:.....3.. r.<;,::r.::-Y:":::;: .... . . ..yv.... . ...
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SAILING CLUB
OPEN MEETING
Thurs.1, Sept. 12
7:45 P.M.
League Ballroom

RAYMOND J. YOUNG
. . . directs study

I

while 63 per cent of the seniors
and 42 per cent of the graduates
said they would be interested in
some type of advanced business,
technical or trade training if it
were aVailable in the county.
DIAL 5-6290
HELD OVER
This Week-End

FIRST

A

L

co

CER

ONLY
SHOWS
DAILY
at 1:30-4:40-8:00 P.M.

I

I

Boll Weevil
Jazz Concert
and
Beer Blast
Al over 21 invited
I.D. Required

Allen
and
Grier

Steve
Addis
and Bill
trofut

The
Gaslight
Singers

:.1

I

I

JOHN

General
tickets on

Hill Auditorium

I

i

-- ____f%__- UL45 A

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