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September 14, 1962 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1962-09-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY,

PAdr E

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 19$~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SE

M .

Tshombe Claims
UN Uses Airlift
Of U Thant's Plan for Unification
Diplonlats Fear Another Rejection
UNITED NATIONS OP) - Katanga President Moise Tshombe ac-
cused the United Nations yesterday of using Trojan Horse tactics
in modern style to move UN troops into his secessionist province.
The UN quickly denied this as it had yesterday denied Tshombe's
version of a clash between UN troops and Katangans.
Tshombe has repeatedly frustrated efforts of the UN to reunite
his rich province with the Congo central government setup and now

Republicans
Show Gainst
In Elections
By GLORIA BOWLES
Several upsets, and a conserva-
tive Republican voting trend,
marked primary election contests
held across the nation this week.
New Hampshire grabbed the
primary election headlines, as con-
servative Gov. Wesley Powell was
defeated in a bid for a third term.
in a contest that gave "Big John"
Pillsbury a 13,582 vote lead. Pow-
ell's hopes for a bid in the 1964
national GOP convention were
dashed, and Gov. Nelson A. Rocke-
feller perhaps encouraged by elec-
tion results for Powell, openly op-
poses any Rockefeller aspirations,
however undeclared, for the Re-
publican presidential nomination.
In another New Hampshire con-
test, the conservative widow of
Sen. Styles Bridges, Mrs.i Dolores
Bridges, tried to repeat the per-
formance of Sen. Helen Neuberger
who succeeded her husband in
Oregon two years ago, but failed
to win in /a close contest with
United States representative Per-
kins Bass! Mrs. Bridges may ask
for a recount.
Has Opponents
Bass will be running against
Democrat Thomas J. McIntyre for
the Senate seat. John W. King,
minority leader of the State House
of Representatives is the Demo-,
cratic nominee for the governor-
ship.
In other contests, State Senator
Carl E. Sanders upset the come-
back ambitions of former governor
Marvin Griffin in Georgia, as he
took- the Democratic nomination
for Governor. The Democratic
nomination in Georgia is tanta-
mount to election.
Political Newcomer
Sanders, in his first state-wide
campaign and a virtual political
unknown who was given little en-
couragement from veteran politi-
cal leaders and observers, cam-
paigned on the racial issue with
promises to stem the tide of in-
tegration.
Also in Georgia, Sen. Herman
Talmadge and Rep. Carl Vinson
were returned to Congress. They
had only token opposition.
In Arizona, conservative state
senator Evan Mecham defeated a
close associate and speechwriter
for Sen. Barry Goldwater, Stephan
Sheddag. Mecham will be pitted
against Democratic Sen. Carl Hay-
den in November.

has declared he has no faith in
a new unification plan in the light
of events - as cited by him - in1
the past two days.
The newest accusation was that
the UN airlifted 2,000 CongoleseI
troops to North Katanga for a
planned assault on three of his
strongholds. He said the troops
were carried .in planes disguised1
with Rhodesian colors and mark-
ings.
Some diplomats viewed Tshom-
be's accusations as a prelude to
formal rejection of UN Acting
Secretary-General U Thant's plan
to end the Katanga secession and
unify the Congo. But UN officials
stressed they had no such word as
yet from Tshombe himself..
A Thant spokesman said "We
categorically deny" the latest ac-f
cusation from Tshombe.
The spokesman had described
earlier charges as "a cynical effort
to gain propaganda advantage."
"Let the United Nations be hon-
est and declare war," Tshombe
asserted. "We shall defend our-
selves, but this will be the end of
the United Nations - forever."'
Tshombe's latest charges were
made at a news conference in
Elisabethville where he said he
heard from very good sources that
a mass attack was planned fory
Sept. 18 on Kabongo, Kongolo and
Mukato, near Albertville.
Taylor Flies
To Cambodiai
PHON PENH, Cambodia (M) -
Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor flew here
yesterday to discuss increasing
American military aid to this
neutralist kingdom in the midst
of Cambodia's fiery feud with pro-
western Thailand and South Viet
Nam.
Taylor, who came direct from
Saigon, sidestepped getting in-
volved in the dispute between the
neighboring South Asian nations.
Taylor said he would discuss in-
creasing United States military
aid to Cambodia during a 24-hour
stopover beforegoing to Thailand.
Taylor told newsmen at the air-
port that he had not yet had a
chance to study "local problems."

Advances
Charged
At Border
NEW DELHI (;P) - India and
Red China yesterday accused each
other of making new advances
across the tense border near the
mountainous Himalayan trail tak-
en by the Dalai Lama in his es-
cape from Tibet.
There were no reports of shoot-
ing, but Prime Minister Jawaharal
Nehru's government said a de-
tachment of ChineseCommunist
troops appears to have crossed
Tuesday into Northeast India, but
a spokesman claimed "we have
the situation in hand."
The Chinese incursion was re-
ported just east of the Buddhist
protectorate of Bhutan, which In-
dia has pledged to defend.
Unofficial Reports
The Nehru government tended
to play down the incident despite
unofficial reports that an Indian
outpost had been surrounded by a
Chinese force outnumbering it
10-1.
A New Delhi spokesman de-
scribed the invading force as a
"group." He said reports 300 Com-
munist troops took part were ex-
aggerated.
The outpost, manned by Assam
riflemen, was reported still in con-'
tact with the Indian Army's East-
ern Command Headquarters. The
government spokesman declined to
comment on the reports the out-
post was surrounded. He said only
that the Chinese were several hun-
dred yards away.
Indian "Aggression"
Peiping's New China News
Agency countered with a charge
Indian troops had set up a new
"aggressive strong point" in Tibet
near Che Dong and protested:
"This marks a new development
in nibbling of Chinese territory."
The Communists also accused
Indian planes of violating Chinese
air space over Tibet and conduct-
ing "reconnaissance and harass-
ments there."
The Chinese Communists have
strengthened their forces along the
disputed frontier since the Dalai
Lama made his escape three years
ago.
Morgan Says UN
Needs U.S. Loan
WASHINGTON (1-P)-The Unit-
ed Nations will have to pull its
troops out of the Congo in a few
weeks unless it receives a sub-
stantial loan at once, the House
was told yesterday. Rep. Thomas
E. Morgan, (D-Pa.), chairman of
the House Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee, urged the House to face
"this fundamental fact" in voting
on a bill to authorize a $100-mil-
lion loan to the UN by the ,United
States.

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